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Discussion Starter #1
Well the time has come to take the step into radiator replacement. My question is a aluminum or Copper/Brass the way to go?

Both are
made in Denmark by Nissen. The Copper/Brass is $154. w/shipping and the alu. is $129. w/shipping. Which is better?
 

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I believe that technically copper (or a copper alloy, such as brass) has better heat conductivity (more efficient). But the aluminum one is going to be a lot lighter and really not that much different in real use.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Matthew Wrote:
Aluminium radiators are more efficient. I'd buy the ally rad.
"Ally Radiators" is that a brand name? Where can I get them?

eEruoParts also sells Nissen.
 

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92-Vert said:
Matthew Wrote:


"Ally Radiators" is that a brand name? Where can I get them?

eEruoParts also sells Nissen.
I believe Ally is a term of endearment for aluminum.

Either that or Matthew has named each and every part on his car.
 

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Yes copper conducts heat better than aluminium. However, aluminium is stronger than copper and the construction of ally ;) radiators takes advantage of that, with a greater finned area exposed to ambient airflow.

The result is that the aluminium radiator is more efficient, even though at first glance that woule appear to be nonsense given that it's an inferior heat conductor.

That reason is also why the aluminium radiator is cheaper than the copper unit.

Nissen is a good brand of radiator.

Naming parts on cars!! :eek: Whatever next? ;) :cheesy:

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The one time I mispell something and don't catch it!

Jezzadee said:
Surely you mean aluminium? ;)
Pffft! Yah, that very light silvery chemichal compound aka Al, atomic number of 13, an atomic weight of 26.981538, naturally solid at 298K. Usually refined with the Bayer method, because although it's abundant it is not found free in nature.:cheesy:

Matthew said:
Naming parts on cars!! :eek: Whatever next? ;) :cheesy:
Well, I've the "green thingy" that I jiggle when the car refuses to start, the "lumpy-thingy" that sometimes comes loose and needs to be set in place for the car to idle properly, and so on... I imagine it's only a small step to actually giving them names.:D

Seriously, though, how often should Bob, er..., the radiator be replaced?
 

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Difficult to give an exact answer to that.

If the cooling system's neglected then the radiator will clog up with rubbish sooner. However, if it's serviced annually with quality antifreeze and distilled water, then it'll last a lot longer.

On a well maintained car, I doubt there's any reason to replace the radiator before it's five or six years old. It is important to regularly check its condition, inspecting for cool spots on the core when the engine's upto temperature.

A neglected cooling system can ruin an engine - if the thermostat fails, a hose bursts, water pump seizes etc then the engine will overheat. You might get lucky, but at worst the headgasket blows or the engine seizes solid (with consequent drivetrain lockup).

A car's cooling system is often neglected until something goes wrong, yet careful maintenance is cheap and easy.

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the info on the radiator replacement. I've dissided to go with the "Ally Rad" or "Cool Colleen" as She will be known from this point on. Yah I like that.
 

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my old 84v had the original leak free radiator(21 years), my current saab has the original radiator (works pritty well):cheesy:
 

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Matthew said:
If the cooling system's neglected then the radiator will clog up with rubbish sooner. However, if it's serviced annually with quality antifreeze and distilled water, then it'll last a lot longer.
Well, I can't vouch for the other eight owners, but I have flushed the system every year, tho I don't use distilled water:eek:
Matthew said:
On a well maintained car, I doubt there's any reason to replace the radiator before it's five or six years old. It is important to regularly check its condition, inspecting for cool spots on the core when the engine's upto temperature.
I have no way of knowing how old he radiator is, though I suppose It's older than five or six years already. I will check for cool spots tomorrow. I'm guessing all I have to do is run the engine until up to temp, then shut down and touch the radiator for differences in temperature...

Thanks for the tips and pointers.
 

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If the rad is original on any Classic 900, I'd replace it (and all hoses) as preventive maintenance.

I got 15 years out of the rad in my '88, and 12 from the one in the '90.

These rads rust out at the bottom first, so you need to remove the fans to get a good look at the condition of the core.
 

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I replaced all the hoses in the system after I had the head gasket fixed, as they were getting soft and swollen. Actually, the large one on the left side of the engine (as one sits in the car) developed a nasty gash and forced the issue.

I had assumed that barring problems the radiator would last and last... They don't seem to be horribly expensive. How involved of a job is this?
 

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woywitka said:
my old 84v had the original leak free radiator(21 years), my current saab has the original radiator (works pritty well):cheesy:
A 21 year old radiator will be knackered, whether it's actually leaking or not. They clog up with limescale, and no amount of flushing will clear that.

As I said before, there's just no point risking the survival or your car's engine on a relatively inexpensive and easily available part. You'll not be so smug when the engine boils over, blows the headgasket and seizes solid :lol:

As for radiator replacement, I've never done it on a 900, but I certainly will when I get another car. I replaced the radiator on a Volkwagen Passat, and that took six hours. The 900 looks loads easier, as there's less to remove in order to get the rad out. If you have the Bentley manual to hand, I'd say radiator replacement on a 900 is a job that anyone who's good with tools could do.

It's worth mentioning that tap water can contain large amounts of calcium and limescale. That clogs up the radiator, and is a major contributory factor in headgasket failure. Distilled water is cheap (less than £2.50/5 litres) and does not cause limescale buildup.

As for antifreeze, I use Comma X-Stream Green as it's based on the same formulation as genuine Saab and the now legendary Mercedes stuff.

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I will add a Bob replacement the the (growing) list of things to do this summer.

This morning I emptied the system and refilled using reverse osmosis/deionized water and coolant... never thought of lime buildup.

And no, I'm not trying to top off the distilled water procedure :D , I just happen to keep reef tanks and have forty gallons of RO/d water available at all times, and it's easier than going out and buying distilled H2O.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
For distilled I use the water I catch from the dehumidifier that I use to keep my basement dry in the summer. I also use the same water for my battery. My plants like it to. I always run it thru a fine mesh filter first.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
GearHead wrote;

um,if tap water contains lime and calcium,what about garden hose water? Yesterday 12:33 PM
Don't they both come from the same well or water source? Even if they don't it wouldn't be distilled.
 

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GearHead said:
um,if tap water contains lime and calcium,what about garden hose water?
Depending on where you draw it from, it may or may not be harder water. If you use well water for your garden, and draw from above the cartesian layer of water, chances are your water will be hard (meaning more calcium and lime will be dissolved or in suspension in the water.)

BTW, I collect rainwater for my garden and assumed it to be contaminated, as in not pure, but soft. I tested it with an aquarium hardness test and it's harder than tap water. I'm unsure if it's a result of the barrel I collect in, or some other causes, since the barrel was used to make wine in its former life, and I belive my father in law cleansed it with lime in between seasons.
 
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