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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2000 9-3 with about 160k miles. My power steering starts whining every week and i have to keep adding fluid (which is expensive!). Are there any known flaws that frequently leak? I haven't been able to spot one.
Thanks.
 

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There is a steel line that runs under the radiator and is very bad to rust through. Especially in areas where a lot of salt is used on the roads.
This is the case on the 94-98 model years and I think that it is the same on the early 9-3's.
 

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I feel your pain! When mine went, I was able to buy the replacement part but I couldn't get the end under the battery disconnected. I returned the part, and cut out the bad section, disconnected the lines at the ps pump and the steering rack, welded on adapter ends and used a premade pressure tested stainless flex hose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I feel your pain! When mine went, I was able to buy the replacement part but I couldn't get the end under the battery disconnected. I returned the part, and cut out the bad section, disconnected the lines at the ps pump and the steering rack, welded on adapter ends and used a premade pressure tested stainless flex hose.
oh god. Im really screwed. It wouldnt be awful if the fluid wasnt 20 bucks a bottle.
 

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...It wouldnt be awful if the fluid wasnt 20 bucks a bottle.
I don't normally recommend this to other people, but... I replaced the imported steering fluid with a generic semi-syn hydraulic fluid, when I repaired mine.

http://www.saabproject.com/NG900SET/PS_lines/pslines.html

There is nothing Saab-specific to the power steering system. Saab has been buying those parts from companies like the former Saginaw Industries in Michigan for decades. It is good practice to replace ALL the fluid until the fluid is clear, or at least if you are not doing that, find out which fluids can be mixed.

And, btw, that one bit near the battery gives everyone trouble, but you can do it with the right tools, flare nut wrenches, and some PB-Blaster to dissolve the rust.

That hard line under the radiator is a cooling line, so although you can replace it with something generic, it is there for a reason, and usually it is just too much trouble to make a custom replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't normally recommend this to other people, but... I replaced the imported steering fluid with a generic semi-syn hydraulic fluid, when I repaired mine.

http://www.saabproject.com/NG900SET/PS_lines/pslines.html

There is nothing Saab-specific to the power steering system. Saab has been buying those parts from companies like the former Saginaw Industries in Michigan for decades. It is good practice to replace ALL the fluid until the fluid is clear, or at least if you are not doing that, find out which fluids can be mixed.

And, btw, that one bit near the battery gives everyone trouble, but you can do it with the right tools, flare nut wrenches, and some PB-Blaster to dissolve the rust.

That hard line under the radiator is a cooling line, so although you can replace it with something generic, it is there for a reason, and usually it is just too much trouble to make a custom replacement.
It is definitely part B right under the radiator on the driver's side at the crimp joint. Id like to do this without taking off the bumper. Is it going to be possible?
 

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...without taking off the bumper. Is it going to be possible?
I don't think so. Taking the bumper off is not difficult, compared to everything else.

I have been thinking that you could just cut off the old pipe, make a custom one, and mount it higher up, but that requires a lot of measuring, some welding, and some trial and error. Unless you have done something like this before, it will be easier just to replace it with the stock part.
 

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ok they do..any idea on how to change the dreaded.....
pump to rack inlet hose.
It can be done - I just did it. Per the Haynes manual, you need to remove the radiator, which requires removing bumper, etc. I found that, once I'd removed the oil cooler, oil lines, intercooler, and intercooler tubes there was just enough wiggle room to do it. (I happened to have the A/C compressor off, too, but I don't think that made a lot of difference.)

The PS pump end goes in first without too much drama, but you do have to sort of corkscrew it up into position. The other end requires a bit of force to get it into place, but I was able to get it in without bending it at all.

You will need to soak the battery end fittings with PB Blaster, preferably over a period of several days. The tube nut at that joint is almost guaranteed to be pretty firmly seized to the tube. My car was from the Northeast, so I had perfect-storm conditions: a rusted-through line and a very funky tube nut. The good news is that it came off without screwing up anything else. That PB Blaster is great stuff!

Actually, removing the oil cooler was the hardest part of the job. The screws holding it to the radiator turned out to have their heads almost rusted off. I had to use the Dremel tool to grind little flats on what was left of the heads so I could grab them with Vise Grips. (Hint - you can use some of the splash shield screws to replace the oil cooler screws if you need some - they're the same part.)

Good luck!
Bob in Nashville
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
where did you get that haynes manual? ive found them impossible to find. id prefer to NOT have to remove the radiator.
 

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I did this job last summer, you will definitely need to remove the bumper, and the intercooler. Removing the bumper is pretty easy, while removing the intercooler depends on where the clamp screws are located. Its not the most fun repair I've ever done, but I was able to complete the disassembly in one evening after work, and the reassembly the next evening after work.

Soak the driver's side line connection with PB blaster ahead of time if you're worried about it - mine looked like it was going to give me trouble and was initially very tight, but then broke free with no hassle or rounding.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did this job last summer, you will definitely need to remove the bumper, and the intercooler. Removing the bumper is pretty easy, while removing the intercooler depends on where the clamp screws are located. Its not the most fun repair I've ever done, but I was able to complete the disassembly in one evening after work, and the reassembly the next evening after work.

Soak the driver's side line connection with PB blaster ahead of time if you're worried about it - mine looked like it was going to give me trouble and was initially very tight, but then broke free with no hassle or rounding.

Good luck!
do to the shape of the hose going in multiple directions. is it an absolute ******* getting it in?
 

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due to the shape of the hose going in multiple directions. is it an absolute ******* getting it in?
Let me correct part of my earlier post. I also had the radiator out, which gave more room to work (but I don't think removing it is essential). After the oil cooler is unscrewed from the radiator, you can also unscrew the condenser. Then, once the radiator hoses and fan wiring are removed, the radiator itself will come out. I didn't remove the intercooler, because it won't come off without removing the bumper. I took out its mounting bolts and removed the intercooler hoses, then I was able to move it around and get it far enough out of the way to get the job done.

As I said in my earlier posting, once the oil cooler lines, oil cooler, and intercooler tubes are removed, it's not terrible. There's a fairly large opening created where the oil lines and foam block around them pass by the radiator. You'll need the front end of the car jacked up pretty high, and the line will more or less feed itself in if you corkscrew it in the right direction.

Again, good luck.

BTW, partsforsaabs.com sells the Haynes manual for the 9-3.

Bob in Nashville
 
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