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I am thinking of installing a handsfree kit in my 04 convertible and looking at places to put it. Many use the Saab phone mount. I was tkning about removing the cup holder on the console behind the gear shift knob and putting it in there. Anyone else try this? Please post pics of your Tel 1 installs to give me some ideas. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Install options...

I am curious to see what some of the Tel 1 installs look like. Anyone care to post their pics of the project. I am thinking about installing it and would like to see some options or finished products.
 

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I am going to take advantage of a bluetooth Tel1 install. The simplist form and I can take the phone to an from the car, it can be anywhere and it will still work with the built-in Tel1 system.

Although I don't use the phone often in car, the times that I do make it worth my while to invest in it.

My first DIY install is the AUX cable. If I can do that, then I think I can manage the bluetooth install as well.

Paul
 

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brunp said:
I am going to take advantage of a bluetooth Tel1 install. The simplist form and I can take the phone to an from the car, it can be anywhere and it will still work with the built-in Tel1 system.

Although I don't use the phone often in car, the times that I do make it worth my while to invest in it.

My first DIY install is the AUX cable. If I can do that, then I think I can manage the bluetooth install as well.

Paul
Phone install is easier than the aux-in in my experience. For the phone you do not need to have the Tech II updated by the often reluctant dealers.

I installed the SONY HCB300 bluetooth kit using the autoleads cables supplied by siocommunications. (www.siocommunications.com). I have had to replace the control unit once as the first failed without warning. I think it was one of a bad batch. Fits neatly on the panel with the butterfly cup holder (where the onstar buttons go).
 

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I'm a little confused on what you're using the bluetooth for? Is there any way to use my bluetooth-enabled phone with the car's speaker and microphones similar to the way I use the really expensive car phone which is built into my radio???
 

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YES. you can get the car to work like an expensive OEM kit.

When I sit in the car (or my wife with her phone for that matter) and turn the car on, it recognises the phone and then switches it to headset mode (automatically).

Now any calls made or received on the phone are routed through the stereo which auto mutes and rings the phone. "Telephone" appears in the SID screen.

You do not get phone book access with my kit, however kits such as the Parrott and the Nokia 610 have additional screens that display the caller, SMS messages and your phonebook automatically.

It is very neat and a cheap way to get much of the OEM functionality (i.e. make and receive calls in comfort and safety).
 

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Vector-Tom said:
Adam - does this combination of leads allow the mic built into the car to be used?

I have a Nokia phone, I guess the Nokia car kits will plug into the Autoleads loom (http://www.siocomm.....109B) too?

Can you use the buttons on the steering to answer and end calls?


It's all rather exiciting if you can. :cheesy:
If you buy the autoleads required to install the car kit in the Saab (assuming you the car is prewired from the factory) then yes - you could use the in built microphones if you choose. (I have heard that it is very poor quality).

The phone button on the steering wheel does NOT work (answering or ending calls), however the volume controls do.

If the car is not pre-wired from the factory it is all still possible, but instead of being a 25 minute job, it is quite a bit longer. Not impossible by any means though.
 

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Etadyne (www.etadyne.com) now has a kit that makes it fairly straightforward to hook up a car kit (bluetooth or otherwise) to the EHU. This approach uses the stereo as the phone's speaker, but still requires the use of the car kit's microphone. Steering wheel buttons for volume control work, but the other buttons (initiate, hang-up) do not. Normally the car kit will have some kind of panel for initiating and ending calls.


I originally did my hookup using the instructions elsewhere in the forum (just search for TEL 1 and EHU), but this kit makes it straightforward.

2003 models also require the installation of a 1:1 isolation transformer to prevent damage to the EHU. I installed one on my 2004 because I'm a little paranoid - and it was inexpensive. The isolation transformer was only a few bucks at Radio Shack.
 

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Handsfree Phone Install

BCarrara said:
I am thinking of installing a handsfree kit in my 04 convertible and looking at places to put it. Many use the Saab phone mount. I was tkning about removing the cup holder on the console behind the gear shift knob and putting it in there. Anyone else try this? Please post pics of your Tel 1 installs to give me some ideas. Thanks.
I have used a Parrot 3100 bluetooth kit with my Sony-Ericsson T630 phone. The kit is wired to the EHU pins 9-10-11 for center speaker and mute (with a radio Shack 1:1 transformer to suppress noise. This is not required on 2004+ 9-3 models). I used a homemade cable for this, but am switching to the Etadyne cable for a more secure connection. The Parrot display/controller is mounted over the (unused) OnStar buttons which makes it easily visible while driving.

I have owned four bluetooth handsfree kits, and the the Parrot 3100 is absolutely outstanding - if you use a Nokia or SE phone that is compatible with all its features (phone book sync, voice dialing, caller ID, etc.). With few exceptions, you can do nearly everything with the phone in your pocket or briefcase.

The phone itself is mounted on a Saab 9-3 Sport Sedan Phone Cradle (part #12787239, second pic) with an Akron CM30 Gripmatic Phone Cradle (http://www.expansys-usa.com - third pic). This looks good and works well, but despite this arrangement, I find that because the Parrot kit is so good, I leave the phone in my pocket on all but long trips.

You can also see my installation of an Audiovox Sirius radio tuner (hard-wired FM modulator) mounted on the CD changer. This location works very well and since I also have an iPod installed (in the console "garage") via aux, I don't use the CD changer very often, but can remove the Audiovox if needed (velcro).

I hope this information is helpful.
 

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kents said:
2003 models also require the installation of a 1:1 isolation transformer to prevent damage to the EHU. I installed one on my 2004 because I'm a little paranoid - and it was inexpensive. The isolation transformer was only a few bucks at Radio Shack.
Do you have a part number for this thing? Is it the same as the Ground Loop Isolator (which is basically just 2 transformers, 1 for each channel)?
 

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Viscouse said:
Do you have a part number for this thing? Is it the same as the Ground Loop Isolator (which is basically just 2 transformers, 1 for each channel)?
It's a different part. The RS part number for the 1:1 isolation transformer is 273-1374 ($3.99 in the US), and is different than the ground loop isolator.

FYI, I used a ground loop isolator (RS part number 270-054, $16.99 in the US) between my XM Commander and aux-in to eliminate any potential loop issues.
 

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Thanks kents!

One note though. I think the purpose of the isolation transformer is not to limit noise, but rather to limit the signal going into the ECU. If the signal was too strong, it would overload the ECU.

May I ask 1 more question: the transformer looks like it has 4 leads. I'm assuming this just inline to the speaker lead. Which leads did you use?

I'd like to put this in my car too. One of these days. :cheesy:
 

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kents said:
Etadyne (www.etadyne.com) now has a kit that makes it fairly straightforward to hook up a car kit (bluetooth or otherwise) to the EHU. This approach uses the stereo as the phone's speaker, but still requires the use of the car kit's microphone. Steering wheel buttons for volume control work, but the other buttons (initiate, hang-up) do not. Normally the car kit will have some kind of panel for initiating and ending calls.


I originally did my hookup using the instructions elsewhere in the forum (just search for TEL 1 and EHU), but this kit makes it straightforward.

2003 models also require the installation of a 1:1 isolation transformer to prevent damage to the EHU. I installed one on my 2004 because I'm a little paranoid - and it was inexpensive. The isolation transformer was only a few bucks at Radio Shack.
So if I get this cable, and buy the nokia handsfree device, is there any directions on how to hook this cable to the handsfree device?
 

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If you search around in the FAQ I think that there is an early post that covers the first instance of someone doing a DIY telephone install - effectively TEL1.

There is a load of good info in this post, but it is not the one I was thinking of.

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21460

You will get plenty of help on here and teh Etadyne website is usually quite helpful. If you follow their guide for the Aux-In install, the telephone plugs in to the same place on the EHU. Power should be available from the back of the lighter / 12V power socket on the dash.

Good luck. The Nokia kit will have reasonable instructions too I guess.
 

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Viscouse said:
Thanks kents!

One note though. I think the purpose of the isolation transformer is not to limit noise, but rather to limit the signal going into the ECU. If the signal was too strong, it would overload the ECU.

May I ask 1 more question: the transformer looks like it has 4 leads. I'm assuming this just inline to the speaker lead. Which leads did you use?
The purpose of an isolation transformer is to eliminate direct electrical connection between a pair of components. The transformer doesn't limit the signal, but prevents other things like ground loops, non-modulating voltage across the leads, etc. I suppose that the transformer could fail (like a fuse) if presented with a large enough spike (sparing, hopefully, the EHU), but that's not the primary purpose. An isolation transformer will eliminate some kinds of noise associated with direct connection, but it won't clean up a noisy signal.

I suspect that there may have been voltage on the MY 2003 EHU inputs, and that the voltage difference encountered when hooking up a car kit led to EHU failures (really guessing here - probably badly - maybe ctrlz can chime in).

As for wiring, there are two pairs of leads on the 1:1 isolation transformer - one pair for the primary side of the transformer, and another pair for the secondary side of the transformer. Because this is a 1:1 transformer, the number of windings on each side (primary & secondary) is the same - you could hook up either pair to the source (car kit) and the other pair to the EHU.

But because I'm anal when it comes to wiring, I hooked up the primary pair to the car kit, and the secondary pair to the EHU.
 
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