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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tools needed, axle stands, T45 torx bit, 18mm socket, allen keys, copper grease, wire brush, high temp paint and brush.

Jack car up, remove wheel and place axle stand underneath the vehicle. At this point your calipers/discs will look like this, rusty scored and generally nasty.


Lever off the retaining spring from the holes on the brake caliper, undo the T45 bolt on the rear of the brake assembly, prise off the dust caps from the inner ends of the caliper bolts, unscrew the caliper bolts and lift away
the caliper (suspend it by a cable tie from the suspension to prevent damage to the flexible brake hose). Remove the inner and outer pads from the caliper. Using the allen keys remove the one securing screw on the face of the old disc and remove disc. Wire brush the mounting surface of the hub ready to accept the new disc (this prevents brake run out).


Comparison of old and new discs prior to fitting.

Thoroughly clean the new disc to remove the transit fluid used by the manfacturers to stop them rusting. Put some copper grease on the mounting hub prior to re-fitting the new disc.
Using the wire brush, remove all the rust from the caliper and use an engine degreaser to ensure thay are nice and clean. Push the piston back into the caliper before refitting onto the caliper carrier. Give the caliper a lick of high temp paint in a colour of your choice and allow 15 mins to dry.


Caliper painted prior to bolting it back on the carrier.

Smear copper grease on the rear of the new brake pads, and fit the inner pad to the caliper ensuring the clip is correctly located in the caliper piston. Fit the outer pad to the caliper mounting bracket (the acoustic wear indicator must face downwards). Slide the caliper and inner pad into position over the outer pad, and locate in its mounting bracket. Insert the caliper bolts and tighten to 86 ft/lb torque, then replace the dust caps. Refit the retaining spring to the caliper ensuring the ends are located correctly in the caliper holes. Pump the brake pedal a few times to restore full brake pressure and you're done, stand back and admire the job you've done. (or Chris has done in my case)


The finished article..looks good, stops great..Brembo high carbon discs with EBC Redstuff pads. Thanks again to Chris for his spanner work, pictures taken by me.
 

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Wow that looks awsome. I also have brembo high carbon disks waiting to be installed. I'm impressed with the fine work, I hope mine turns out like that. I also am getting EBC green stuff pads. Keep me posted on how they peform. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Some numpty walked out infront of me this afternoon, i can confirm the Redstuff/Brembo combo works well. Now if you'll excuse me i have to wash my pants!! :eek: :cheesy:
 

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what does it mean when you say cleaning the hub surface will prevent run out?

and what did you clean the rotor with before install?
 

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The hub surface that is incontact with the inside of the disc needs to be smooth and flat, if not any uneven ness can cause "run out", where the disc isnt sitting flat, a wire brush does the job fine ;)

The discs where cleaned with a decent engine / parts degreaser ;)
 

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Brake Juddering

"Brake juddering is a fairly common complaint on all cars, whether standard or high performance. In most cases, the brake discs will have warped and a replacement set is the obvious cure for the problem. However, the cause of the problem can often be found elsewhere and the replacement discs will soon warp as well. It is not only essential to fit new brake discs, but to also rectify the cause of the problem in the first place, otherwise the juddering is likely to return.

From our own experience, we have found that the following causes are likely to result in a warped brake disc:
Seized calipers - either a seized caliper piston or a seized caliper sliding pin will result in uneven forces being applied to each side of the brake disc. Suspension bushes - tired TCA or anti-roll bar bushes.

Poor quality pads - these can overheat quickly, particularly if the brakes are used often and hard. The excessive heat from the pads can cause the discs to overheat, resulting in the discs warping.

Hubs - although rare, it is possible for the hubs to warp. Bolting a disc to a warped hub will always result in brake vibration. The same will also happen if any rust from the hub face is not removed before fitting the disc. After fitting a disc, we always recommend checking for disc run-out using a dial gauge. If the run-out is out of tolerance, then the disc should be re-fitted in an alternative position (i.e. turned through 90o) until run-out is within tolerance"



So run out is where the disc centre isnt complely flat against the hub, maybe due to rust etc and as a consequence it "runs out" of true, at the outside edge of the disc this will be exagerated and will be felt as a vibration or judder through the pedal as the brakes are applied ;)
 

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very nice explanation. I wonder if that happened when I let the indie mechanic put my brakes on... brand new and already seems a bit vibrating at speed.

should have done it myself and saved $$$ and done it right.:roll:
 

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Haha, me and a friend did the brakes this morning, we did a brembo/ebc green stuff combo, really easy job to do yourself, turned out to be fun. You can save a lot by doing it yourself thats for sure!
 

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missed one step that i would add.

open up the Brake fluid resevoir, will make putting the pad easier when compressing the caliper. also C-Clamps can be useful for compressing the calipers.
 

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Question,

Is there a different procedure for replacing the rear brakes, or is it generally the same procedure?
Great article by the way!

Thanks,
Matt
 

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hi there,

Just a word of caution, these are 1500ish kg cars with up to 300ish hp, brakes are pretty important. i'm all for having a go at things, but great care should be taken with brakes. If you have to ask how to fit them, first ask yourself if you should be fitting them.
 

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brakes

through my many years I have done brake jobs on Triumphs, Renaults, Fiats, Toyotas, Mitsubishi 3000, Vw, Subaru and I am sure others which I have forgotten. I always check shop manuals and/or today I reference internet forums for persons who have done the work. The procedure I was questioning is becoming more and more popular today, and I was curious if Saab also used this method. Thanx for your concern.........but this was just a simple question to avoid any possible damage to the caliper.
 
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PPP said:
hi there,

Just a word of caution, these are 1500ish kg cars with up to 300ish hp, brakes are pretty important. i'm all for having a go at things, but great care should be taken with brakes. If you have to ask how to fit them, first ask yourself if you should be fitting them.

Hi PPP, welcome to the forum.

You make a valid point about fitting brakes, fortunately most members that try this repair have some car diy experience.

Where abouts in Suffolk are you?

Not many 300bhp 9-5's around in the UK :D
 

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hi there,

sorry ekibobrut1 was not talking about you in particular just generally, not everybody will be as experianced as you.

Finn - Ipswich/suffolk

bye
 

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So, what do you people think about these brakes?

Here

They seem like a pretty good deal for brakes and pads. I don't know though, do these types of brakes run through quickly?

Also, anyone notice any real differences with the viggen brakes compared to the stock 9-5 ones?
 

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I had that set up on mine they worked ok.

The viggen disc is slotted and looks cool but you will get a better improvemnt from a decent pad rather than the disc in my opinion.
 

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So what do you reccomend? I need the whole set up up front redone.
 
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