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1988 9k Turbo

while poking around the engine bay trying to resolve the endless amount of grease and fluids I came across my crankcase breather hose ....in two pieces.

alongside the block where the hose rests on a U shaped clip and splits into a Y the hose was split. I went ahead and removed it and the turbo inlet hose due to a considerably amount of oil leakage all around that area (see photos).

does anyone have a similar experience where the diagnosed what was leaking the oil? I cleaned the inlet hose and noticed two area that were deteriorating - do these look like possible culprits?

I ordered a do88 silicone replacement for the crankcase breather hose however I had to cut the old hose off of the metal line that lives inside - does anyone have tips on reinstalling those metal hose into the new breather hose?

lastly, there was various clips throughout this system - is there any reason to keep these over a standard hose clamp?

happy motoring!

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I can't think of any other source right there except the oil line going to the top of the turbo housing.
 

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Iv
I can't think of any other source right there except the oil line going to the top of the turbo housing.
I’ve considered since the breather hose is expected to be a week+ shipping time pulling the turbo and cleaning that general area up further. Both oil and coolant is due for a flush as well.

is there anything anyone recommends investigating/maintaining while the turbo inlet hose is out?
 

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In general I always look for excess oil on either side of the turbine due to seal failure. Also look for exhaust build-up due to gasket leaking anywhere before or at the turbo. That's loss of power.
 

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In addition to the above. This is not likely to be he cause, but, check to see if oil is leaking out of the distributor. It does on my C900. There is a seal in there that needs to be replaced on mine.
You can see the oil on the "shield" under the distributor on my car.

I don't see any shield on yours in the first photo.
 

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In addition to the above. This is not likely to be he cause, but, check to see if oil is leaking out of the distributor. It does on my C900. There is a seal in there that needs to be replaced on mine.
You can see the oil on the "shield" under the distributor on my car.

I don't see any shield on yours in the first photo.
I will keep that in mind, there is oil around the base of the distributor as shown in photos however it’s hard to tell the source right now due to the amount of oil that is in the bay.
 

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Standard SSteel gear drive Plumbing clamps work well (home depot?) Nothing outstanding or even desirable in those original types.
Also: In the not so distant past. Removing that sometimes problematic twin tubed PCV pipe contraption with a simple pcv hose and Catchcan for the blowby oil..was an oft used 'alternate' repair.
Did require stopping the water tube connection ends though. And finding a spot to fit an oil catching jug.
Although, if unconcerned, a straight exhaust tube is an even easier solution.
 

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Standard SSteel gear drive Plumbing clamps work well (home depot?) Nothing outstanding or even desirable in those original types.
Also: In the not so distant past. Removing that sometimes problematic twin tubed PCV pipe contraption with a simple pcv hose and Catchcan for the blowby oil..was an oft used 'alternate' repair.
Did require stopping the water tube connection ends though. And finding a spot to fit an oil catching jug.
Although, if unconcerned, a straight exhaust tube is an even easier solution.
that sounds interesting. Would you simply plug the intake manifold port that typically connects to this setup and run the pcv line directly from the PCV nipple to a blowby can?
I have removed my windshield washer canister and can use that empty space for said blow by can.

I ask because I am hesitant about fitting the metal line that lives inside the OEM PCV breather hose into the new hose I have ordered.
 

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According to lore, the reason why that pipe runs through the PCV breather is to "warm up" the blowby and make it easier for the turbo to consume (and help with condensation). If you're in a warm climate, I wouldn't worry about the tube being outside of the breather. If it gets very cold, it may not be a bad idea. That being said newer 9000's did not run this tube through the breather hose in any climate, so it may not be necessary...
 

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According to lore, the reason why that pipe runs through the PCV breather is to "warm up" the blowby and make it easier for the turbo to consume (and help with condensation). If you're in a warm climate, I wouldn't worry about the tube being outside of the breather. If it gets very cold, it may not be a bad idea. That being said newer 9000's did not run this tube through the breather hose in any climate, so it may not be necessary...
I have read this as well through various forms and living in Phoenix means I have no use for a coolant hose in the PCV line.

game plan as of right now is going to be to plug the upper coolant line in the throttle body, use the silicone do88 hose I ordered and later plumb in a oil catch can.

for right now there is other ways I could spend “catch can money” like a valve cover gasket and typical maintenance (IE Spark plug and wires, rotor cap, etc). I have absolutely no service records so my intention is to replace all maintenance items to have a good starting point.
 

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According to lore, the reason why that pipe runs through the PCV breather is to "warm up" the blowby and make it easier for the turbo to consume (and help with condensation). If you're in a warm climate, I wouldn't worry about the tube being outside of the breather. If it gets very cold, it may not be a bad idea. That being said newer 9000's did not run this tube through the breather hose in any climate, so it may not be necessary...
On this same note I’ll add/confirm - the coolant passes through the intake manifold solely for this PCV line correct? Meaning I would also remove the lower coolant hose that leads to the intake manifold and cap it at the coolant pipe? Would you recommend something as simply as a vacuum line cap or due to coolant pressure it needs to be something with a hose clamp to block off those passages?
 

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I haven't looked at the route the cooling system takes in ages, if I were you I would complete the cooling loop, just outside of the PCV hose.
 

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The engine has a fully enclosed crankcase ventilation system consisting of a nipple beside the camshaft cover. The crankcase gasses are evacuated through the hose dividing nipple in the camshaft cover, through a small-bore hose to the throttle body or the intake manifold (depending on the year and the model) and a large-bore hose to the intake hose upstream of the turbocharger where the gasses are mixed with the intake air and combusted in the engine. The crankcase gasses are always evacuated through the small-bore hose except when there is overpressure in the intake manifold when the check valve in the small-bore hose shuts off the flow. The gasses are then evacuated through the large-bore hose to the intake manifold on the turbo and then to the engine. The hoses and their connections are sized to give satisfactory evacuation of the crankcase gasses from the engine under all operating conditions.

To avoid icing, the system is water heated.
 
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