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Discussion Starter #1
I have recently come to the realization that my pcv system is starting to go out and that is why I am having oil seepage from the valve cover. I ordered a bunch of parts and I am waiting on them in the mail but as I have been waiting I have just been checking up on the hoses to make sure everything is doin okay. When I popped the valve cover hose off today I noticed instead of the normal black oil residue sitting inside, it is now white and milky. I was worried somehow my head gasket was going out or something so I started checking my oil, but the oil looks perfectly fine from the dipstick. I’m waiting to do my oil change when I do the pcv system too cause im dropping the oil pan to make sure the oil pickup not filled with sludge, so I guess I’ll really know then. Main thing is does anybody know how it could be turning white or anything?

Secondly I am also looking to see if anybody knows what part this is and where to buy it, it is absolutely filled with the white oil and is starting to rust.

279421


If anybody has any info it’s much appreciated!

I am sorry if I get some things wrong I am new to Saab’s! 😁
 

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You haven't stated the car's model year, but that pipe is originally part number 9183849, superseded by 30567027. The far end of it joins a pipe down to the catch can/oil trap, and it allows the air intake "cobra" pipe to suck vapour into the intake and burn it. 2004 onward cars had a plastic pipe with a flow restrictor at the mid point where that bracket is, and a different fitting to the cobra so they're not interchangeable. For a spare, try a scrap yard/pick-and-pull.

Sounds as if you have a larger problem though, the white milky slime is evidence of water in the oil. My experience luckily doesn't extend to dealing with that and I'm sure others will advise.
 

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Where are you located?

Cars in colder climates develop the creamy oil and moisture reside unless they are driven for at least a half hour on the highway in order to get things hot enough to cause the moisture to evaporate.

If you are in a colder climate and you drive a relatively a short distance and find the cream it isn't a big issue at all.

NOTE: When you are replacing the PCV hoses replace one at a time, do not remove them and then start to replace, you will lose your mind trying to figure out where they all go.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you to both of you who have replied!

The car is a 2000 with over 220,000 miles and has been in Alaska for 20 years. So if what you are saying about the white creamy oil is correct (which I hope you are) then that would explain quite a bit. I will update again when I tear everything down!

Thank you for all the advice and information, it’s much appreciated!!!
 

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The car is a 2000 with over 220,000 miles and has been in Alaska for 20 years.
How long have you had the car?

Do you know if the PCV system has been updated?

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have had the car for a bout 7 months now and from my knowledge the pcv system has not been updated.
 

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If the PCV hasn't been updated that is job 1, job 2 is to drop the oil pan (called a sump around here) and clean out the oil pan and the oil pickup screen.



Due to a suspect PCV system and a longer recommended oil change schedule per the original owners manual these engines are subject to a sludge problem.

Do you know any of the car's maintenance history?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have the entire update kit for the pcv system on the way, but because I’m in Alaska that adds a bit of extra time on shipping. I also was having problems with the throttle body going into limp home mode so I ordered a new one. For the sump I did get a new gasket and high temp gasket maker to double check the pick up and make sure there is no sludge but I don’t want to drop the oil pan until I have everything else here, I’d like to just do everything at once.

As for the maintenance records, sadly there weren’t many and no sign of the pcv system being updated. When I bought the car I remember doin a oil change immediately and the oil was quite black. Ever since then I’ve been doin oil changes every 3,000 miles just to keep up to date on it and make sure there is no sludge build up.
 

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It sounds like you have a good plan to save the car, there isn't a gasket on the oil pan, use anaerobic sealant.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Do I lay the sealant on the seam of the oil pan or on the outside, and if I lay it on the seam do I need to flush the oil or anything to make sure it doesn’t get in and clog anything? What’s the process?
 

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Apply a thin coat to the pan before re-install, any sealant that gets in the pan will stay liquid and dissolve in the oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Alright, thank you, I appreciate all the advice and the links to the other discussions!
 

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My pleasure, is the car an AERO or a base model?

Is it a manual or automatic transmission?

If it is a manual AERO there is a good chance there are two hidden bolts on the sump/pan at the transmission end, you have to cut two access holes in the pan to find them.
 

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correct sealing is loctite 518.
replace the 3 o rings, 2 in interconnection tube, 1 in oil snorkel.
check main and conrod bearings or while the oil pan is off, simply replace them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
So I have been driving around all day and it does seem that it has solved the white milky oil problem.

The car does have heated seats.

Thanks for the advice about the bearings!
 
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