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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little over a year ago, I was changing my own engine oil on 9-3 V6 engine. I made the _foolish_ mistake of attempting to use an oil drain plug, purchased from a SAAB dealer's parts department upon their specific recommendation, that was clearly not the same dimensions as what was in place and had successfully used in the past. I stripped a good part of the threads where the plug threads into, but was able to successfully put in the original oil drain plug.

Since then, I have had one semi-local non-dealer change the oil, followed by two different SAAB dealers. The last time I had the oil changed at the dealer, they noticed and brought to my attention the partly-stripped oil drain. I was somewhat prepared for this and provided some thread sealant.

The service advisor recommended replacing the oil sump pan, but I am concerned this could be quite difficult to find, and pretty expensive as well, and I have no idea what the part # would be.

At present, I see no oil dripping from the plug, though over the past several months I have had to make small oil adds (1/4 quart Mobil1 0W-40) every one or two months. This could be associated with normal engine wear (well into 6-figure mileage)

Should I feel comfortable attempting to change my own engine oil again, and simply reusing the existing drain plug with thead sealant? Or should I continue with dealer dependence until I can eventually replace the sump pan?
 

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Well, the oil pan has gone up a little since I last looked at it:


Part Number
12620916
Description OIL PAN
Saab Suggested List $789.00
Quantity package?
Part Code (D = discontinued)
Superseded use this new number >click link
Core Charge $ 0.00


... Ron​
 

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I found the oil pan for $591.25 at saabparts.net. It does have a retail price of $789.

Bummer that the threads are stripped out. :cry::cry::cry::cry:


I hope that helps.
 

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Holy cow is that alot for a piece of metal! Hope you can work something out.
Perhaps you could cross shop the Caddy SRX but be careful as oil pans can vary between models due to frame fitments, etc.

BTW, how many miles do you have on the V6?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ferms, '97 Ron: thanks for the info. I have to take responsibility for my mistake. I would have been better off simply continuing to reuse the drain plug, and ignored the probably well-meaning but misinformed advice from the parts department (it brings to mind Nassim Taleb's warnings about "empty suits").

Cosmic: I am not inclined to take a chance with a SRX's part. >120000 miles, so absolutely no more recall coverage, reimbursements, freebies, etc. :cry:

I think in the short term, I may try _carefully_ reusing the plug that is in place right now, together with the thread sealant, as I believe there is enough good thread left. It may behoove me to remove all the old, dried sealant before applying new sealant. I am concerned that my dealer will shaft me as hard as they can if I let them take too much initiative in caring for my vehicle.

Ferms: does the WIS have anything on oil sump pan replacement?
 

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I bet the sump replacement is a big deal - probably you have to remove the subframe which means a new alignment so even if you DIY you're out a thousand bucks and days of effort.

One option is to go with a slighly bigger plug and buy a tap and die set to cut some new threads. This might be tricky, since you don't want to leave any cut metal bits in the pan but you could probably find a way to make that work (grease on the tap and maybe flush a quart or two of cheap oil through). Oh, and these tools are very hard, but also very brittle and easy to break, so you might wind up with a tap stuck in the hole instead!

But I think your current solution is the best. If it doesn't leak, it's serving it's purpose just fine, and such a big repair might cause other annoying problems. I wonder a little about the thread lock, since things will be coated with oil maybe it won't stick so well? Another way to go might be to apply some oil proof silicone (in the permatex section at autozone) to the outside. That would keep the thing from vibrating loose. Just a thought, obviously what you're doing now is working, so maybe the oily thread idea is a needless worry on my part.
 

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I don't think replacing the pan on the 2.8T is that big of a deal. I'll have to check the WIS tonight and see. I'll try to post when I find out. The only thing in the way, iirc, is the oil cooler. BUT I could be totally wrong.

I think the pan is made from aluminium. That may explain the price.
 

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I think there are oversize drain plugs available in the aftermarket. You over-drill the old threads and re-tap, then use the oversize plug. Or, a HeliCoil might be a possibility. It seems a shame to replace the whole pan.
 

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You have to take the engine out of the car to replace the oil pan on that engine as the timing cover needs to be removed.

Yep, that would be a nightmare job. :eek:

These work really well: [/QUOTE] Yup that is what WIS say...correct" way. Just a thought, I have no idea.
 

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You have to remove the timing cover. There is no front cover gasket on that engine - it is a "Tri-Bond Assembly Adhesive. The lower part of the oil pan is structurally part of the part of the front cover when all is bolted together so removing the pan would compromise the bead of sealant. One could try to seal the bottom of the cover, but a leak is guaranteed.

The oil pan gasket is made with the same adhesive. You have to remove the cover first and then the oil pan. Assembly is reverse - pan first then the front cover.

Lots of work.
 
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