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Discussion Starter #1
I recently picked up a Viggen convertible and noticed that the prior owner had done something quite strange to the door trims and the back bumper strips. There appears to be some kind of cheap black paint that was partially absorbed into the trim areas which was also dripped onto the clear coat in some areas. Anyone have a suggestion as how to clean it off both the car paint and the trims? It looks horrific.
 

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Try a clay bar or some rubbing compound. They must not have liked the textured gray paint that those parts are painted with from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Try a clay bar or some rubbing compound. They must not have liked the textured gray paint that those parts are painted with from the factory.
I have tried the clay bar on the car's paint. The paint has been on there a long time and baked into the clear coat. I will try some rubbing compound! The door trims are not painted, they are a dense kind of plastic that revives best with Back-to-Black usually.
 

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WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIT! DON'T USE RUBBING COMPOUND!

It will damage and remove the clear coat. Put a photo on some photo site like photobucket.com and just post the URL if you can't get a photo up here. There are safer things to try first.
 

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There are clear coat-safe rubbing compounds out there. I've used 3M Perfect-It to get out quite a few nasty marks on my car. Before someone points this out to me, my car wasn't clear-coated from the factory, but some of what I've had repainted is.
 

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There are clear coat-safe rubbing compounds out there. I've used 3M Perfect-It to get out quite a few nasty marks on my car. Before someone points this out to me, my car wasn't clear-coated from the factory, but some of what I've had repainted is.
There are some that are safe, but most people are buying the old school ones or have that old tin of RC in their garage. You need to be careful.

There are also polishing compounds that are much less agressive, which would be the second step I'd take after some solvent based steps. RC would be the last choice.

FYI - the solid colors were always single stage (no clearcoat). I prefer that since you can really remove small scratches. However, it does mean that you have to polish yearly to keep the oxidation down and keep up with your wax/surface coating too. It's old school but it's better IMHO if you actually care for your car. For the average Joe who doesn't know how to care for paint and doesn't care to, clear coat has some advantages.

The Metallic/Pearl colors are all clearcoat. The Laser Red was a solid color that came out as a clearcoat in 2001 and single stage red went out of fashion. The black and white and the occassional solid blue have stayed as single stage.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Here is the link to the pics of the damage. A couple are not that great but you can see what I am talking about. I talked to an expert car restorer today who who said there are rubbing compounds out there that will help but you are correct that it cannot be the old school stuff. He has to see the car before he will recommend what he think will work. I am going to try regular rubbing compound on the door trim itself - not the paint and see if it does anything. As you will see - the paint has been partially absorbed into the plastic.

http://rides.webshots.com/album/582124174pyMPeR
 

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If you are anal then remove those pieces and replace. When removed you can clean up the over spray or whatever it is with a clay bar and some elow grease. When those pieces are off you can try applying some form of rubber/plastic enhancer that brings black back. If this does not work then you can paint them with trim paint or even plasti dip them. Lots of options but do not use rubbing compound on your paint.
 

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I could be wrong but it looks like a product called forever black. It is a automotive dye thats used to stain faded black trim.

If I am correct I have used it on my saab for years and even the trim on my ford escape also. The dye didn't take well on the escape and looked like that and there was even a few drips on the paint. I used lacquer thinner on the trim and paint and it removed everything safely.
 

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You can use Forever Black, but remember that the Viggen's trim was never black to begin with. It's supposed to be a dark grey that matches the bumper tops.
 

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^ What he said

The trim was a dark gray color. It tended to fade, and some people got wax in it, just like they do with flat black, and made it look like crap. Looks like someone tried to use some top-coating product on it an made it much worse.

You can start with some thinner but I don't think you'll end up with anything you like the look of. There's a product for auto-body paint prep you can get that removes stray stuff. You could try auto enamel reducer. You could try wood alcohol, laquer thinner, acetone, and xylene - but the danger increases as you go. Definitely test the acetone & xylene somewhere hidden first to make sure it does not dissolve the plastic before using.

I don't think they are going to look good no matter what you do though - you will end up painting the trim.

You could use the same sequence on the body panels. You could also use a light polish and work your way down in grade. until you get whatever it is off. If you find a local auto body supply store (not an autoparts store) they should have a series of grades you can purchase... or you can try an on-line supplier that carries 3M products.

I prefer the solvent choice because it's easier on the surface when you're working a small area, but test that too in a less visible, but clear coated area. If you're anal about it, test all solvents and check with a serious magnifier - and the micro level, you can see solvents like laquer thinner actually change the surface of clear coat, although it looks "OK" to the naked eye.

EDIT: If you want to DIY paint your trim back to the stock color, word on the street is that Duplicolor Gun Metal Gray is almost a perfect match. YMMV.
 

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I did not know the viggen trim was a dark grey, can't say I ever saw a viggen in person before.

What I was trying to get at was the way it looks like the prior owner used forever black and was applied improper. On my ford escape, the trim was a grey color and( never would i do it again) applied forever black an it was steaky like in the OP pictures. Forever black comes in a bottle with a sponge applicator on the tip of it. If you aren't careful you will get the dye on your paint. If you look closely at the trim you will see the black dye on the paint.

On my escape I used lacquer thinner and it got all of the product off. It was alottttttt of work to get it off but it came off and looked better than when i bought the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Update - I used rubbing compound with a scrubby pad on the trim only and it came right off. The paint expert said to use 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner #08984. We tried it on a less obvious drip on the side and it worked just fine on most spots and the more dense spots used a clay bar. It did take off the wax, but not the clear coat at all. Whatever was used sat on top of the plastic & clear coat which was the saver in this case. My Viggen trim/bumper looks like it should! ;ol;
 
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