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Okay so I'm about to travel back home, and I have a list of things I need done on my 01 9-5 V6 SE.

One of the things I"m going to do it buy a air compressor and I wanted to buy the paint canister to change the grey into a black.

What I wanted to know is there a certain type of paint I need to use, and how should I apply it? Also I want to apply Compound to make it glossy but also don't know how to apply it. I've been searching but can't seem to find any useful info.

Any help would be greatly appriciated guys...

P.S. My 9-5 has all grey except for the front passenger door and fender... which is GREEN! haha it's the main reason I want to paint it all black.
 

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Its a BIG job to paint a car properly. if you want it to look decent, expect to be putting in around 50-75 hours of work.

Among the air compressor, you need access to a completely dust free space, an HVLP paint gun, a couple quarts of auto-paint, the hardener, sealer, reducer, and clear coat. Not to mention the correct spraying technique- using a spray gun is no walk in the park.

You have to take the car down to bare metal, which usually means media blasting. You can also do it with a DA sander, but thats a lot of work. Some people opt for chemical strippers as well.

there was a tutorial on a home DIY paint job that a guy did to his VW cabriolet, it was thorough. I think he did about the best job you could do spraying in your own garage, i'd search on google and read through his tutorial.
 

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wrap it. It easier and less expensive.
i hope you dont mean DIY:eek: :cheesy:. I would opt for a wrap as well, albeit professionally done.

If you have the time though, a DIY home paint job CAN be done right and look good for under 1000 bucks your first time, mainly because of the cost of an air compressor.
 

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It can be done diy, but then again, I do that sort of thing for a living so its easy for me to say. A diy wrap job with no exerience will likely come out better than a diy paint job with no experience and with far less time involved.
 

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It can be done diy, but then again, I do that sort of thing for a living so its easy for me to say. A diy wrap job with no exerience will likely come out better than a diy paint job with no experience and with far less time involved.
really? i'd think wrapping would be a ***** because of the bubbles and trying to lay it down properly/evenly. Then again, you're really only out the money for the wrap if you mess up- so it isn't too big a risk anyway.

You know, if i could get the wrap i might try my hand at doing it myself someday :cool:
 

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My opinion? If you don't know how to use paint (or even how to apply compound?), you shouldn't be painting an entire car in your first attempt.

I did body & paint work for almost 10 years. It's not bad when you know what you're doing. It can be hell if you don't.
 
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Wouldn't it be much cheaper, easier and better to get a cheapo Maaco paint job? It's not going to be perfect and I am not familiar with your painting skills but that would be my choice.
 

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Wouldn't it be much cheaper, easier and better to get a cheapo Maaco paint job? It's not going to be perfect and I am not familiar with your painting skills but that would be my choice.
Maaco paint jobs are generally of poor quality, although they have different "package" options. They usually look decent for the first few years, until the paint starts cracking, bubbling, and peeling.

The reason their paint doesn't last is because its a poor quality single stage, and they dont paint the door jambs, engine bay, etc. I've seen a few that look nice, but none of the lower quality jobs last very long.

I'm with you though, its probably going to be better than something you can do yourself, especially if its your first time.
 

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Its a BIG job to paint a car properly. if you want it to look decent, expect to be putting in around 50-75 hours of work.

Among the air compressor, you need access to a completely dust free space, an HVLP paint gun, a couple quarts of auto-paint, the hardener, sealer, reducer, and clear coat. Not to mention the correct spraying technique- using a spray gun is no walk in the park.


You have to take the car down to bare metal, which usually means media blasting. You can also do it with a DA sander, but thats a lot of work. Some people opt for chemical strippers as well.

there was a tutorial on a home DIY paint job that a guy did to his VW cabriolet, it was thorough. I think he did about the best job you could do spraying in your own garage, i'd search on google and read through his tutorial.
hi, you will only need about 2 litres paint ( 2 pack , no one uses acrylic anymore,,,)

doesnt have to be completely dust free , as you will be rubbing back the paint before you buff it anyways.,

take the car back to bare metal, no . !!
my brotehr does this for a living , professionally at bruce lellman crash repairs , in renmark , and they ONLY EVER take a panel(s) back to metal only if necessary.

waste of time with chemical stripper , they now soda blast it , with bicarb soda !! or some similair type stuff.
mark k
 

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^^ why would you NOT take the car to bare metal? that doesn't make any sense to me. The more layers you're painting over the worse the potential outcome is for the finished product.
 

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^^ why would you NOT take the car to bare metal? that doesn't make any sense to me. The more layers you're painting over the worse the potential outcome is for the finished product.
Because if you know what you're doing (proper sanding, filling, priming & block-sanding), there is absolutely no need to remove everything down to the metal.

Yes, an improperly sanded or repaired section can look like utter crap. You see it all the time, especially on black or other dark-colored cars.
Doing body-work is not just something you "decide" to learn. Lots of people do it for a living, but it doesn't mean that its easy.

The factory primer is some of the best material used to protect metal. By removing it, you are doing yourself a disservice. Just my $.02.
 

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Because if you know what you're doing (proper sanding, filling, priming & block-sanding), there is absolutely no need to remove everything down to the metal.

Yes, an improperly sanded or repaired section can look like utter crap. You see it all the time, especially on black or other dark-colored cars.
Doing body-work is not just something you "decide" to learn. Lots of people do it for a living, but it doesn't mean that its easy.

The factory primer is some of the best material used to protect metal. By removing it, you are doing yourself a disservice. Just my $.02.
i think most DIYers DO make the mistake of improperly prepped sections though, hence the neccessity for taking it down to metal. There are few DIY paint jobs that can be deemed "pro" in that regard, but i've seen quite a few that don't look bad at all.

I wouldn't really consider painting a car anyway unless it was a cheap, very old car that NEEDED it. Sounds like the OP's car does, though- but it also looks like a wrap might be the way to go for him.
 

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^^ why would you NOT take the car to bare metal? that doesn't make any sense to me. The more layers you're painting over the worse the potential outcome is for the finished product.

mmm ok, i should have also said , that if there are like heaps of layers of paint , well yes then strip it back,,, but NORMALLY you dont....

mark
 

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I had a dent in the front drivers door. Thought I could do it myself:nono;. Took the layers back, filled and sanded, got it presentable, with primer, till I put top coat on. Looked ok till got up close, still see where the filler was. Sanded back to bare metal. Primered and Top coated, now looks as though someones gone over it with a ripple.
In sum up, New door time.
 

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I had a dent in the front drivers door. Thought I could do it myself:nono;. Took the layers back, filled and sanded, got it presentable, with primer, till I put top coat on. Looked ok till got up close, still see where the filler was. Sanded back to bare metal. Primered and Top coated, now looks as though someones gone over it with a ripple.
In sum up, New door time.
hi, after you put your filler in , start rubbing with a coarse paper , e.g 80 grit ...as it cuts cleaner , straighter and flatter than paper that is too fine.'
did you make sure your filler/bog feathered out properly into the surrounding metal or paint ? ( would be nice to finnish off with 180 grit or finer )

make sure its all rubbed with a half sheet block ( half A4 size....)
feel the repair with a clean thin rag under your hand. sometimes you can notice irregularities in the repair better than just your hand.

try not to rely on the primer doing the work that the bog should be doing.
try and get it feeling as perfect as you can get it in bog or filler.

i dont know if your using a aerosol or spray gun. but put on plenty of primer and allow each coat to flash of for a good few minutes.

after undercoat is dried , spray a very fine mist ( you should just see it !) of black paint / primer over your primered repair.

using the block , with 600 grit , block the repair until the black guide coat you misted on has been rubbed away. if ANY black remains , this will indicate low areas or ripples.
always keep the block flat when rubbing , and dont dig the corners of the block in the repair.
dont try to rub these black low areas out , they will need more filler or primer.

if you rub thru and filler is showing , dont worry about it , keep rubbing till the black guide coat is gone . then make sure you put a little primer over the filler thats showing and give a light scuff with 600 or 800 grit before you paint.

you can finish off with 800 grit , by hand , no block before you paint but dont use too much pressure or dig in with your fingers.

mark
 
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