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Discussion Starter #21
So what you're saying is neither of your 9000's were bought new and you don't work on them...while at the same time you belittle and admonish others who actually do work on their pre-owned 9000's and have documented, hands on experience.

I don't want to make it sound like you're a totally useless git. There are moments when you do offer up some information that is of use to the board. But this is clearly not one of those times, and this is your pattern more often than not...you don't bother to read a post; you just knee-jerk your way into it in an aggressive confrontational manner that serves no one but yourself so that you can go home at the end of the day and show your dog how you stuck it to those SaabCentral people. You probably read your posts back to yourself out loud.

Like I said, you can be a useful contributor - as you have been on occasion - but you just won't let yourself because you can't avoid slipping down the rabbit hole of your own self-aggrandizing egotistical view of yourself
 

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I work on my 9000, both of them.

As for the other irrelevant character assassination attempts, couldn't care less so best you save your breath.
 

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Yesss Saabs can be a PITA at times.
Gawd knows.. I bought my first one New in '84.
And have owned one ever since.
Current '97 I've had for 15 years bought at 40,000 miles/ 70,000 kms has only rarely given me minor trouble.
It's Gasp! proven to be quite reliable.
When one buys some beaten /worn out 'Expensive when New' car for Beer Tokens.
Surprise at it's inevitable repairs/reliability issues is a Bit Unseemly.
 

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Yesss Saabs can be a PITA at times.
Gawd knows.. I bought my first one New in '84.
And have owned one ever since.
Current '97 I've had for 15 years bought at 40,000 miles/ 70,000 kms has only rarely given me minor trouble.
It's Gasp! proven to be quite reliable.
When one buys some beaten /worn out 'Expensive when New' car for Beer Tokens.
Surprise at it's inevitable repairs/reliability issues is a Bit Unseemly.
Again--I'll point out--THERE IS NO useful reliability comparison to a 40,000 mile car and a 250,000 mile car. At high mileage you simply have to INSPECT and renew as you have time... ie: The clutch disc is either worn past useful or it ain't, same as the brushes in the alternator and the starter--if worn replace--IF you don't inspect you'll know they're worn out AFTER they fail to operate as intended...

If I didn't ENJOY the feel and utility of the 9K, I wouldn't have bought one to clean up, maintain, restore/renew...
 

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This is incorrect. High mileage cars can be as reliable as low mileage cars, more reliable in many cases since disuse is not beneficial to car service life. Very, very little preventive maintenance is required for well maintained modern cars.

For example, you cannot usefully inspect a clutch disc for wear. Standard practice is to renew the disc at the first sign of slippage and not before.

Even brakes only require very infrequent checking if you have any familiarity with the expected service life, which you would if you drive the car regularly.

Engine oil has industry recommended service intervals which if followed will lead to virtually indefinite engine life for these cars. Brake fluids should be changed every two to three years. Standard glycol coolants should be flushed every two years and longer life coolants as their makers might specify. Transmission oils do not have regular service intervals for these cars. Batteries can be easily checked using the dashboard display if you know what to look for. Five to seven years is good service life for a quality properly sized battery. Many reliability issues are simply worn out batteries. Wiper blades should be renewed every two years unless the car is parked indoors for most of the time, then three to four years is not uncommon for good blades. Starters, alternators, AC compressors and steering racks generally last the life of the car and need replacement only when obviously failing. Starters generally fail suddenly and cannot be usefully inspected before failure. Ditto alternators. Steering racks typically leak just before failure. Tie rod ends, like ball joints, show wear long before they have to be replaced.

Shocks and springs are basically lifetime components on these cars. Suspension bushings last the life of the car as do wheel bearings and ball joints, frequently. Certainly one would not replace bushings, bearings or ball joints unless signs of wear were present. Engine mounts are consumables but at very long replacement intervals.

If you maintain a car as specified by the manufacturer, which most North Americans do not, then they remain as reliable as when new after any warranty repairs have been completed. I have owned three cars maintained in this fashion and still have two of them, either of which I would have no hesitation in driving as far as I wished.

Of course all of the foregoing only applies if you really know how to drive, which most North Americans do not.
 

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Taillight assemblies are trash.

Drown everything in dielectric grease and you might stand a chance.
Corrosion is not an issue. The issue is loose sockets which of course no amount of dielectric grease is going to fix.

The complaints detailed in this thread are based on the idea that the plastic bits are not durable. If you own a 9000 from new or buy one properly serviced throughout its life you would know this is not correct. There is nothing wrong with the design or manufacture of these parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Corrosion is not an issue. The issue is loose sockets which of course no amount of dielectric grease is going to fix.

The complaints detailed in this thread are based on the idea that the plastic bits are not durable. If you own a 9000 from new or buy one properly serviced throughout its life you would know this is not correct. There is nothing wrong with the design or manufacture of these parts.
Here we go again. Superaero please refrain from posting in others' threads...certainly I would respectfully demand that you keep your bs out of my threads. This thread is NOT ABOUT the plastic bits not being durable. If you actually read and understood - from a dirt in your fingernails work on your car point of view - you would have gleaned that this thread is about the adhesion of the metal bulb socket to the plastic base...which is clearly a flawed design.

And as you have already noted...you have not owned any 9000 from new. So quit playing this elitist game of yours. And again, keep your garbage out of my threads.
 

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Corrosion is not an issue. The issue is loose sockets which of course no amount of dielectric grease is going to fix.

The complaints detailed in this thread are based on the idea that the plastic bits are not durable. If you own a 9000 from new or buy one properly serviced throughout its life you would know this is not correct. There is nothing wrong with the design or manufacture of these parts.
Corrosion was an issue on my car, and no water had even gotten in. The contact to wire junctions had gone flaky over time. The entire setup is weak and wired up like a kid's 100 in 1 electronics kit.

The socket retention is also trash and not set up to withstand the forces inherent in extracting the assembly from behind the carpet.

It's a booby trap nearly as bad as the fuel line check valves.
 

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Water can get into the taillight bulb holder. The most common way is from the open hatch. If you do get water in their the bulb failure indicator can false signal.

I repeat, do not use dielectric grease to fix your loose bulb holders.

If you get enough water contamination for long enough even the best bulb holders wil corrode enough to cause circuit problems.

The SAAB design and construction of these components is excellent and any failures can be attributed to hamfisted servicing or failure to keep water out. Poor quality bulbs are a major problem. Using European made bulbs with nickel plating works best. Replace in matching pairs, always.
 

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If you get enough water contamination for long enough even the best bulb holders wil corrode enough to cause circuit problems.
Except for gasketed sockets used on virtually every other car.
 

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SNIP...

The SAAB design and construction of these components is excellent and any failures can be attributed to hamfisted servicing or failure to keep water out. Poor quality bulbs are a major problem. Using European made bulbs with nickel plating works best. Replace in matching pairs, always.
" Ironically, parts quality declined noticeably under GM ownership despite the presumably significant QA leverage GM could exert. Instead we see the effects of GM exerting downward pressure on supplier prices. The results of that business method were bankruptcy for SAAB and for GM. "
Superaero

Excerpt from post # 2 of this very thread...

Superaero--you really need to practice being a low-quality lawyer somewhere else...

These posts do not contribute to better maintenance...
 

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" Ironically, parts quality declined noticeably under GM ownership despite the presumably significant QA leverage GM could exert. Instead we see the effects of GM exerting downward pressure on supplier prices. The results of that business method were bankruptcy for SAAB and for GM. "
Superaero

Excerpt from post # 2 of this very thread...

Superaero--you really need to practice being a low-quality lawyer somewhere else...

These posts do not contribute to better maintenance...
No, I don't think so. My legal skills are not up for discussion although I will point out that you would be well advised to hire me should you need representation. My win record is pretty impressive.

Your quote does not refer to the rear lamp assemblies which date back to a SAAB design of 1985 when the 9000 was first released. SAAB failed under GM ownership because they refused to lower the quality to match GM's requirements.

I have owned SAABs continuously for 40 years. I have direct personal experience of value to everyone who reads this board. I have R&R a complete SAAB drivetrain, replaced shocks, brakes, exhaust, electrical and so on, off and on for forty years of SAAB ownership.

The attendees on this board are changing and not for the better. The Alfa board I attend retains its solid enthusiast base which is sadly no longer the case for this board. The true SAAB enthusiast is not well served by this forum now. Mind you SAAB is now dead and Alfa remains in business.
 
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