SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently put a relay going to my cooling fan so it would come on everytime i turn the car on. This seemed to work fine for the past week. Today I was driving around town and the damn car started to overheat again. This time it was BAD.... I pulled over let it cool down, poured water on the radiator. after about 30 minutes, I took the cap off the coolant tank and it was completly dry. i refilled it and drove for about 2-3 miles and it got HOT again. Long story short, i went through an entire bottle (4 liters) of anti-freeze on a 15 mile trip and it took me 2.5 hours to go 15 miles with the stopping and cooling the engine before i could drive. The coolant tank get completly dry after it over heats and i do not see any coolant under the car when i'm stopped. Is it evaporating?? my hoses are hot so i'm assuming the thermosatic switch is opening. Just tired of this overheating problem.. Please Help if you can!!


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have a new thermostat swtich to change, but with the clicking im hearing i'm assuming it's opening and closing. Could the overheating be caused by a bad thermostatic valve? the part that has 2 wires going into hooked up to the top of the radiator? If so any suggestions how to check if it is bad?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I have a new thermostat swtich to change, but with the clicking im hearing i'm assuming it's opening and closing. Could the overheating be caused by a bad thermostatic valve? the part that has 2 wires going into hooked up to the top of the radiator? If so any suggestions how to check if it is bad?
The clicking ou are hearing is NOT the switch opening and closing. Dont worry about that right now. You need to find the source of your coolant loss. If its not leaking out, then it's going inside the engine. Not good if that's where it's going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The clicking ou are hearing is NOT the switch opening and closing. Dont worry about that right now. You need to find the source of your coolant loss. If its not leaking out, then it's going inside the engine. Not good if that's where it's going.

well thats not good.. wouldn't the car be driving rough or acting up if I were driving around with coolant leaking into it? any ways of checking myself without having to take it in to a shop?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Not necessarily. Worst case, you have a failed head gasket. That could cause the car to produce white smoke from the exhaust if the coolant is leaking into the combustion chambers. I don't know your skill level, but you may need a pro's advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not necessarily. Worst case, you have a failed head gasket. That could cause the car to produce white smoke from the exhaust if the coolant is leaking into the combustion chambers. I don't know your skill level, but you may need a pro's advice.
Im not getting white smoke. Just alot of steam when I pull the car over and open the hood.

I have worked prevoisly on a 97 Supra. My skill level is average, Still learning the European cars. I just want some better help using this forum instead of following a repair book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Where is the steam coming from? Is your radiator in good shape? The fact that you are losing coolant at a rapid pace is definitely where you need to start. As for water pumps...usually the seal goes bad and they will weep coolant. As long as the belt is still on the pulley and it's turning, you can rule that out. When I had a mystery coolant leak on a GM product several years ago, I tracked it down by pressure testing the cooling system. Maybe that's a route you could take.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,986 Posts
The clicking part you asked about is your AIC (automatic idle control) and as already stated will have nothing to do with your overheating/coolant loss issue.

When the car is cool.
Pull each of the spark plugs and check their color. (google a color chart if you don't know what to look for) Check your oil dipstick for milkyness--this indicates coolant getting into the oil... then
Fill the resevoir with water--start the car and warm it up. After warmed up you should feel the upper radiator hoses getting hot--this will indicate a movement of coolant by the water pump. Pull the cooling fan fuses so you can safely feel the radiator. If you feel any noticably cool spots on it than it has blockages and that is part of your problem. While the car is warming up place your had over the exhaust. If the exhaust feels really moist this could be where your coolants going.

To confirm a head gasket failure (or worse, cracked head) find a shop that will perform an "exhaust sniffer test". This will check your coolant for the presence of exhaust fumes indicating a head gasket/head failure.

That should get you started
hth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Where is the steam coming from? Is your radiator in good shape? The fact that you are losing coolant at a rapid pace is definitely where you need to start. As for water pumps...usually the seal goes bad and they will weep coolant. As long as the belt is still on the pulley and it's turning, you can rule that out. When I had a mystery coolant leak on a GM product several years ago, I tracked it down by pressure testing the cooling system. Maybe that's a route you could take.

The pressure test on the resevoir tank was done last week when I added the relay for the cooling fan. there were no leaks and pressure was good. The steam is coming from the coolant tank. the coolant seems to be boiling in the tank and steaming out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
That's weird. Are you sure you are bleeding all the air out of the system. If its air bound, it will boil over real quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The clicking part you asked about is your AIC (automatic idle control) and as already stated will have nothing to do with your overheating/coolant loss issue.

When the car is cool.
Pull each of the spark plugs and check their color. (google a color chart if you don't know what to look for) Check your oil dipstick for milkyness--this indicates coolant getting into the oil... then
Fill the resevoir with water--start the car and warm it up. After warmed up you should feel the upper radiator hoses getting hot--this will indicate a movement of coolant by the water pump. Pull the cooling fan fuses so you can safely feel the radiator. If you feel any noticably cool spots on it than it has blockages and that is part of your problem. While the car is warming up place your had over the exhaust. If the exhaust feels really moist this could be where your coolants going.

To confirm a head gasket failure (or worse, cracked head) find a shop that will perform an "exhaust sniffer test". This will check your coolant for the presence of exhaust fumes indicating a head gasket/head failure.

That should get you started
hth

Exactly what I needed to know.. Thanks! ;ol;;ol;
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's weird. Are you sure you are bleeding all the air out of the system. If its air bound, it will boil over real quick.

I don't take the cap off, I can see steam coming from under the cap and the resevoir is to hot touch. I take the cap off after 10 minutes to find the coolant tank empty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,986 Posts
I don't take the cap off, I can see steam coming from under the cap and the resevoir is to hot touch. I take the cap off after 10 minutes to find the coolant tank empty.
After running that hot (and dry) steam pockets will form in the coolant passageways that could block properly refilling the system. Wait till it's cooled off for an hour or more and then fill it back up. Squeezing the upper radiator hose will/should cause visable movement inside the plastic resevoir.

There's also a bleed nipple near the thermostat housing--you can open that while filling till you observe fluid come out, then close it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I was referring to the bleeder screw that needs to be opened to 'burp' the air out. You won't get good circulation if air remains in the system. If that seems ok, I would definitely follow Banman's advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
I would start by replacing the cap on the reservoir. If its the original radiator it may not be very efficient anymore. I was having the same problem 5 years ago on my 92 2.1l and didn't want to deal with it at the time thinking a blown headgasket was causing the coolant to boil out the reservoir tank cap..8 months ago I decided to fix it only to find no evidence of coolant in the cylinders or the crankcase. So I changed my water pump, radiator, all the hoses, and the reservoir cap and put the car back on the road. It's been running at the halfway mark since then, where it used to run 3/4 to 7/8 of the way to hot. Sorry for rambling, hope it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,197 Posts
When I first got my vert it ran hotter than I liked to see. Changing the thermostat and thermostatic switch helped quite a bit but putting a new coolant tank cap helped even more.

It's important to understand that the tank is not an expansion tank like American and Japanese cars have. It's a pressurized tank and if the cap is bad it's just like having a bad cap on an old-school radiator. You can take the cap apart, btw and clean the little valvey things, but for $15 or so you should get a new one and keep the cleaned one in your toolbox for an e-situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
When I first got my vert it ran hotter than I liked to see. Changing the thermostat and thermostatic switch helped quite a bit but putting a new coolant tank cap helped even more.

It's important to understand that the tank is not an expansion tank like American and Japanese cars have. It's a pressurized tank and if the cap is bad it's just like having a bad cap on an old-school radiator. You can take the cap apart, btw and clean the little valvey things, but for $15 or so you should get a new one and keep the cleaned one in your toolbox for an e-situation.
Good point! There is a huge difference between the tank on our Saabs and the expansion tank on most cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,923 Posts
I don't take the cap off, I can see steam coming from under the cap and the resevoir is to hot touch. I take the cap off after 10 minutes to find the coolant tank empty.
If you can see steam coming from under the res. cap it is a good indication that the coolant is escaping past the cap valves. It happens and empties your reservoir. Clean the cap valves, they come apart or get a new cap. This doesn't mean it's the only leak you have, but escaping past the cap shouldn't happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Sounds like a good investment for my planned cross-country trip in Aug...I think the expansion cap tank might still be the original one...what's a good source for one, eEuroparts, or someplace like that?
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top