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I decided to try my hand at an oil change and gearbox fluid change on my 86 manual. It's been sitting a few weeks while I drove my 91 automatic. The gearbox part went perfectly. I was feeling proud.

Then I moved on to the oil. I decided to change it because it looked like a thick foamy sludge on the dipstick. It was almost black when I wiped the stick with a rag. So, I get the plug out and fairly decent looking oil came flowing out. It was not clean but it looked no where near as bad as what I pulled out with the dipstick.

Then I noticed that only about 1 quart drained out (my probably poor estimate). But it certainly was not 3 or 4 quarts. Then I changed the oil filter. The oil in the filter was thick and very dark. Not as bad as the dipstick oil, but much worse than what came out the drain plug.

So I plugged it up and poured 2 quarts back into the engine. I then checked the oil level and it was easily 1 quart to high (maybe more). Not thinking at all, I ran the car for about 5 minutes. I checked the level and it had not changed.

Still not thinking, I drove the car about 20 miles to a few stores and back home. It runs and sounds great.

Please help me. What does this mean? Is something clogged inside? Is it the oil pump? Should I not drive the car? Is this something I can fix (I know all of you will say yes)?

Thoughts? :cry:
 

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I'm not an expert on this, but from my limited experience it sounds like you already anserwed your question. It sounds to me like you have an engine oil sludge problem. Foamy black thick oil is no good. When was the last time the oil was changed? Has the car been sitting for awhile? How's the temperture guage looking? I would refrain from driving if you can until someone can tell you for certian. If you have to drive I would say to watch the temp and avoid harsh driving. Here's some good reference that might help you. http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't hit me, I used SeaFoam.

I've been reading a few threads and now I think I went wrong with using SeaFoam about a month ago. I've bearly driven 60 miles since then, and I planned on getting an oil change when I got to 100 miles.

The last oil change was 7 months ago. The engine has been ticking all year, so I've been looking for a solution. The car has been sitting for about a month while I drove the '91 (she's probably pissed off, women!).

The engine oil bible was GREAT. Everyone should read it. But I'm still not sure what to do.

The temp gage is fine. No overheating.

I'll listen to suggestions. But I'm thinking of getting to the dealer to get all of the oil out with the least damage from flushing.
 

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wow

whats weird is that your gearbox fluid wasnt empty, but the engine oil was
normally its the other way around

seems like a good cure the the sludge would be seafoam, run it (drive it) for a while (i dont know how long), then change the oil, then change it every several hundred miles after that, pouring some seafoam in a few days before each change

DISCLAIMER: this is just a best guess, ask someone who knows more about the issue
 

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The UP side...If you have a bunch of sludge in the engine, Seafoam will indeed break it up if used often enough.

The DOWN side...If you leave it in TOO long, it will DEFINiTELY clog up your oil pump strainer (if it's not already) and cause oil starvation.

Put it in, use a light foot on the throttle for a day or so then change the oil. Wait a couple of days before you do it again.

This is the Voice of Experience. Leaving Seafoam in a dirty Ford 5.0 too long cost me crank bearings and an oil pump.

No oil light?
 

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ooooooooo, this is bad.

If you have an oil sludge problem then you must drop the gearbox to clean out the sump. The Gearbox case is the sump:eek:

The Saab 9-5 has a self destructing engine because of severe sludge issues; however, the B202 in the 900 is nearly void of sludge issues. THis is the first time I have EVER heard of it.

Sea Foam causes more issues then it solves, let this be a lesson to all. I have read so much on sea foam, stop putting this stuff in guys!:(

Even if a B202 sounds like a bag of nails, just change the oil and let it be, they nearly NEVER blow up and I have yet to see a b202 burn oil, unless the turbo is bad. SUre they can get noisy, but they are so well built!

Would anybody know if this would work?: PS DO NOT DO THIS!

Try filling up the engine with 2 litres of gasoline, let it sit for a week, drain it and then fill it with oil?
 

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I think, the best solution is to buy plenty of oil filters and one or two barrels of oil and drive the car for a two, three days, mybe for a week with light throttle, but for a longer distance, without too much rapid speed change, then change oil with filter, check, how much oil comes out and what state it has, fill engine with fresh one and do it again and again. No aditives, just fresh oil. After seven or ten oil changes it should be OK.

or You can take engine out, dismantle it and clean all internal parts, mount it back and hope, that everything is as it was before. Compare, what is cheaper...
 

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Woywitka is right, the only proper solution is to get the sump off and clean the engine out properly.

Filling with petrol and draining, forget it. You may well dislodge some muck but not drain it out thus ending up worse off than when you started.

Any flush product like sea foam would be intended to remove minor deposits - not what is being talked about here.

If you can't do it get a mechanic to, it may cost in the short term but if you try to bodge the job it'll end up costing you an engine.
 

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woywitka said:
Sea Foam causes more issues then it solves, let this be a lesson to all. I have read so much on sea foam, stop putting this stuff in guys!:(
I'd never heard of this SeaFoam stuff before coming here - it's not something we get this side of the pond, I don't think. So I had a little look at their website.

Blimey, the way they pitch this stuff, it sounds like it'd probably bring on world peace and a solution to all famine, pestilence and plague!

Put it in your fuel, and it cleans everything and solves every fuel system malady.
Put it in your oil, and it cleans everything and solves every lubrication malady.

If you put it on your breakfast cereals, does it restore you to perfect health, too?

Mebbe I'm a natural cynic - it wouldn't be the first time that accusation's been levelled at me - but it strikes me that anything being sold with that much zeal and that many claims is probably finest extra-virgin cold-pressed snake oil...

Would anybody know if this would work?: PS DO NOT DO THIS!

Try filling up the engine with 2 litres of gasoline, let it sit for a week, drain it and then fill it with oil?
It'd probably soften the sludge on the bottom of the sump, but you'd be screwed if you even *thought* of starting the car with it in - and the risk would be of lumps too big to fit out the drain hole being loosened which'd then block the strainer.

I think I'd be tempted to try it on an expendable engine, though I'd make sure I refilled with cheap oil, drained it, then again, started it, drained it before putting decent oil in and properly running it.
 

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woywitka said:
the B202 in the 900 is nearly void of sludge issues. THis is the first time I have EVER heard of it.
I was told by one knowledgeable Saab mechanic that the use of "flushing oil" before an oil change was a good thing to keep an engine clean. However, using it on an old engine where it hasn't been used before runs the risk of filling the sump with sludge as all the accumulated stuff gets washed down at once. I guess this is what happened here...
 

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First thing I'd try (being a simple fella) would be to pull the drain plug - when the oil stops flowing stick a screwdriver up the hole and try to dislodge whatever is blocking the flow. ;) I might even take some solvent and shoot it INTO the sump to see if I could wash any remaining spooge off the floor of it.

What I would NOT do is to run solvent through the bearings or fill the sump with gas - first because I'm not a fan of re-doing crank bearings and secondly because I'm not a big fan of uncontrolled garage fires.
 

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SteveTheFolkie said:
First thing I'd try (being a simple fella) would be to pull the drain plug - when the oil stops flowing stick a screwdriver up the hole and try to dislodge whatever is blocking the flow. ;) I might even take some solvent and shoot it INTO the sump to see if I could wash any remaining spooge off the floor of it.

What I would NOT do is to run solvent through the bearings or fill the sump with gas - first because I'm not a fan of re-doing crank bearings and secondly because I'm not a big fan of uncontrolled garage fires.
If you took the dipstick tube off you could almost see into the sump with a torch or could poke something in to give the bottom a good scrape and see what was there.
Perhaps put some solvent in through that hole and wash it through out of the drain.
 

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SteveTheFolkie said:
First thing I'd try (being a simple fella) would be to pull the drain plug - when the oil stops flowing stick a screwdriver up the hole and try to dislodge whatever is blocking the flow. ;) I might even take some solvent and shoot it INTO the sump to see if I could wash any remaining spooge off the floor of it.

What I would NOT do is to run solvent through the bearings or fill the sump with gas - first because I'm not a fan of re-doing crank bearings and secondly because I'm not a big fan of uncontrolled garage fires.
what is wrong with a good olde fashioned garage fire?

I think filling the thing with gasoline would work to "soak" the engine. Petroleum is from Crude oil, just like 10w-30.

I would be worried about solvents in the engine that are not petroleum based, they "could" ruin the bearing by promoting rust. Gasoline will protect the engine from rust....would it not?

I would NOT start the engine with gasoline as a lubricant.....:eek:

I WOULD drain out the gasoline after a week then refill it with oil, run the car around the block and change the oil again.
 

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The problem with gasoline in a confined area like a garage is its volatility. Way too many fumes would escape the sump. Those fumes only need a tiny spark to create an explosion.

If you want to pour a solvent into the sump, I would opt for kerosene or diesel fuel. Pour some down the dip stick tube and let it sit for a bit, then drain out.

After that treatment, I would cycle some "rinse oil" thru the motor before I did a full refill and buttoned it up. Replace the filter after the rinse cycle, too!

Good luck.
 

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Gabby said:
The problem with gasoline in a confined area like a garage is its volatility. Way too many fumes would escape the sump. Those fumes only need a tiny spark to create an explosion.

If you want to pour a solvent into the sump, I would opt for kerosene or diesel fuel. Pour some down the dip stick tube and let it sit for a bit, then drain out.

After that treatment, I would cycle some "rinse oil" thru the motor before I did a full refill and buttoned it up. Replace the filter after the rinse cycle, too!

Good luck.
Diesel is a good Idea, ATF woudl work too. Many people have pured a little ATF in thier oil before a change for a rinse and had no troubles.

The b202 is really strong, it would be interesting too see what effect this would have on the life of the engine. Either way, putting some detergent in the oil to get clubs out is better than starving the engine of oil in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Still horrified but determined

I spent at least 4 hours yesterday reading your posts and whatever I could find in the other threads and the threads of other sites. Most of the answers were scary. Again, this is a 1986 900s Manual.

So here is what I will try based on my reading :cry:

1. Buy some diesel.

2. Buy lots of oil and oil filters

3. Drain out what ever comes out.

4. Poke around up in there to try to dislodge anything.

5. Use a turkey baster to squirt some diesel up through the drain hole. Replace plug.

6. Pour in diesel and let her sit for a few days. I have no garage, so no fires.

7. Do the repetitive flush, fill, flush.

8. Pray.



Question: With this model, can I drop the gearbox or oil pan to get at the oil pump strainer. I don’t think so from my reading, but I want to be sure because someone suggested it. I think the whole engine has to come out for that.
 

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Gabby said:
The problem with gasoline in a confined area like a garage is its volatility. Way too many fumes would escape the sump. Those fumes only need a tiny spark to create an explosion.

If you want to pour a solvent into the sump, I would opt for kerosene or diesel fuel. Pour some down the dip stick tube and let it sit for a bit, then drain out.

After that treatment, I would cycle some "rinse oil" thru the motor before I did a full refill and buttoned it up. Replace the filter after the rinse cycle, too!

Good luck.
I've heard to mix some kind of kero(or diesel)/oil ****tail (maybe 1 part to 3) and run the engine a couple minutes. I'm not sure I'd do that though.
 

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Wekesa said:
Question: With this model, can I drop the gearbox or oil pan to get at the oil pump strainer. I don’t think so from my reading, but I want to be sure because someone suggested it. I think the whole engine has to come out for that.


No.

In most cases it is less trouble to pull the engine out with the gearbox and seperate the two :(.

We are not going to gurantee that putting Diesel in the egnine would really work and it is possible that it could really screw something up. The important thing is that many people have put ATF in thier cars before an oil change and had no issue.

I would think that with no turbo you would most likely be fine. Just do lots of oil changes after with really cheap 10w-30.

Try a coat hanger too to scrape some stuff out.
 

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Tomarse said:
If you took the dipstick tube off you could almost see into the sump with a torch or could poke something in to give the bottom a good scrape and see what was there.
Perhaps put some solvent in through that hole and wash it through out of the drain.
And by a "torch" they mean a flashlight. We definitely do NOT recommend inserting any sort of flame into your dipstick or drain plug hole. ;)
 

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Yipcanjo said:
And by a "torch" they mean a flashlight. We definitely do NOT recommend inserting any sort of flame into your dipstick or drain plug hole. ;)
Haha, that was my first thought as well! I was all, "I suppose it would help you see... but isn't that kinda asking for trouble?"

Torch =
, NOT


Bonnet =
, NOT


Hooray for Google Image Search!
 
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