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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to change the dip stick moulding for one with a side outlet nipple and connect it with a "T" piece to the pipe returning from the oil trap and going eventually into the intake side of the turbo and wondered what you more knowledgeable folks thought since I'm leaving the oil trap as is. Please advise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What are you aiming to accomplish?
I suppose to improve blow-bye evacuation. The car has 63k on the clock and the rubber piping is hard/solid and I'd say in good shape but I admit I cannot see what's inside. Since the #6 revision did not stay for very long I conclude it wasn't much help to the sludge problem and as far as I can tell the increase to the little hole in the outlet from the oil catch vessel seems to be about it. I concluded that the evacuation from the dip stick vessel might be of some help, hence my proposed top only change. What do you think? I bought new original style tubing as well just not the tube with the check valve in it.
 

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I would just install PCV #6 and nothing further. That setup has proven reliable for countless OG9-3s and early 9-5s. Keep your eye on the rubber parts and replace them when needed. My experience is that they last 10 years or so, as do most rubber parts, and then must be refreshed.
 

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2005 Saab 9-5 Aero Sedan '98 corolla until my 9-5's engine is finished:'~((
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I agree w above. People have installed catch cans and things only to find it was an unnecessary waste of time - no blow by and no issues with update #6
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree w above. People have installed catch cans and things only to find it was an unnecessary waste of time - no blow by and no issues with update #6
I suspect there will still be blow by but the job is to get it to the turbo input. I feel the lack of flow/partial blockage in the pipe and to the little hole in the catch can is what causes the problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I suspect there will still be blow by but the job is to get it to the turbo input. I feel the lack of flow/partial blockage in the pipe and to the little hole in the catch can is what causes the problems.
Yes thinking of normal engine blow by, pipe age and sump sludge from what might be shed from soft old PCV piping. I find it difficult to imagine that much positive turbo pressure really needing the additional check valves in the #6 system. My aim is not to take off the sump too soon for cleaning and prevent the leaking oil from the known points dripping on to my garage floor - with the help of the synthetic oil for high mileage engines. That's the plan - I'm getting on and it's not so easy getting under these days.
 

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I'm getting on and it's not so easy getting under these days.
With all due respect, you are totally overthinking this.

Sixty three thousand miles on your car is hardly broken in in Saab years, unless there were far less than the recommended oil changes per the manual (which we all know was flawed but not fatal for a sixty three thousand mile motor) then you are wise to drop the pan (it's not a terrible job), if you are "up there" in years pay a shop to do it for a hundred bucks, they are out there, it's a totally simple job on a hoist.

How far along is "getting on"? :giggle:
 

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63k is nothing, in any sense of modern car engines. I don't even start to consider age on an H motor until 200k is within view. PCV #6 is well proven, and you need to remember on boosted cars PCV is not a simple matter. I would not second guess the manufacturer without some serious engineering background.
 

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I would just install PCV #6 and nothing further. That setup has proven reliable for countless OG9-3s and early 9-5s. Keep your eye on the rubber parts and replace them when needed. My experience is that they last 10 years or so, as do most rubber parts, and then must be refreshed.
Unless they're pps brand hoses! Slapped a new set in a yr ago & they're already feeling mushy. But i guess thats to be expected
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
63k is nothing, in any sense of modern car engines. I don't even start to consider age on an H motor until 200k is within view. PCV #6 is well proven, and you need to remember on boosted cars PCV is not a simple matter. I would not second guess the manufacturer without some serious engineering background.
Well I had another clue, and it was spots on a piece of card under the car after driving about 50 miles and keeping my foot off the accelerator to maintain a zero boost situation or the boost control was dumping the pressure created by the turbo. It was then I realized the reason for the check valves in the #6 PCV hoses since the pressure must have been going back to the crankcase and + ve pressure = oil leaks.
I think I'll get the full #6 kit, that's my thinking.
 

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another vote here for replacing the whole PCV system with the v-6 version (eg the last PCV update kit for the 1999-2003 engine models)
the v-6 kit is cheap, has all hoses (with a new valve) , the new oil trap, and the oil filler replacement funnel with the breather nipple. it is also easy to fit (compared to the later 2004-2009 engines where the new oil trap has to be plugged into the back of the engine).

low mileage engines (1999-2003) are not immune to the sludge problems, it mainly depends on the driving style. low speed city traffic with lots of start stops, poor engine oil used, and problematic pcv design are the main culprits. so dont mess with taking your own hobbyist improvised modifications, use the saab engineers trained brainpower and problem solving design to implement your (overdue) PCV v6 update.
this (now web archived) webpage gives good information on the PCV system and the various modifications implemented

ps: while you wait for your new kit to arrive, do the PCV glove test to get a general idea if your current pcv system is correctly functioning with slight -ve pressure at idle, or has positive pressure (glove inflation). this will
 
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