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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #21
We need photos of the blue interior!
About that. The interior is actually not blue.
Looked blue-ish yesterday but it was also overcast and dark so i assumed the leather was some faded blue, looked like it anyways.
Turns it's just some nasty shade of gray.
Dark blue leather doesn't sound that bad, if color matched with the car i think it would fit well.
Also i can't swap the console from my NG900 because it ripped when the airbag deployed.
Another thing i found out is that the car has been repainted but in the cheapest way possible, like one of those $300 paint jobs you see on YT. The paint is flaking in places.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #22
IMG_20200216_142207.jpg IMG_20200216_142404.jpg
The wood in the 9-3 looks orange and the grain is boring, not sure what wood it is but the deep red cherry in my ng900 looks much better.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #23
IMG_20200216_111143.jpg IMG_20200216_165412.jpg
Spare wheel well got quite rusty since there was water pooling with no way out.
I popped the drain plugs out, brushed the rust away and sprayed on some zinc spray.
Might weld some new metal in when weather gets better.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #24
IMG_20200216_155715.jpg IMG_20200216_160555.jpg
Big rust hole. Not a problem since my NG900 was nearly rust free so i can cut this bit out and weld a new piece in.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #27
IMG_20200216_142231.jpg
And this is why i can't use the dash from my NG900.
IMG_20200216_142303.jpg IMG_20200216_142028.jpg
I think the darker interior from my NG900 would fit this car better.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #28
Anyways, there are still three main things i want to address:
  1. The trunk still reeks of cat piss no matter how much i clean. So i'll swap the carpeting over from my NG900.
  2. Rear right speaker reads 4 ohms, everything else is open circuit. I'll swap all 4 speakers in from, you guessed it, my NG900.
  3. Before any of the above can be done i need to address the stuck rear right seat latch. Only the left latch works so i can't fold the rear seats.
Also the local wreckers should still have a dark blue 4-door OG9-3, i'll pay them a visit next week to see what the interior in that one looks like.
 

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Saab called that weird grey color "graphite". It is an odd shade, but at least it's better than than the mousy light grey they used on the 9-5 for a while. Still, I much prefer the NG900's black interior parts.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #31
Guys, i thought LPT's didn't have an intercooler at all, but the engine situation in this 9-3 is exactly the same as in my NG900.

IMG_20200216_164055.jpg
 

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I think hardware wise they are identical to the 185HP 9-3. I seem to recall that the NG900 LPT lacked a BPCv, but I think with the 9-3 they included that. So, just the ECU difference.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
I think hardware wise they are identical to the 185HP 9-3. I seem to recall that the NG900 LPT lacked a BPCv, but I think with the 9-3 they included that. So, just the ECU difference.
Cool, so i can load the hot map and it will work no problem.
But before i go loading the hot map i'll have to check the condition of the turbo.
And if the turbo is bad i can just swap in a reconditioned T25 i had laying around for the last three years :)
 

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Yeah, with the '99, it's all just the T25 turbo. With a T7, they'd change that to the TD04, but you're all set to go. Make sure the hot map is the B204R and you are done.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #35
Also should i get w30 oil or play i safe with w40 oil in case the engine is worn more than i expected?
Wouldn't want to pour some w30 to later find out it gives me a low oil pressure light.
Thinking about it, the chain tensioner should tell me exactly how worn the engine is, right?
When i changed my NG900 oil from w30 to w40 i noticed the turbo spooled much later, would be nice to have some thinner oil to spool the turbo sooner.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #36
Ps: I think the thread has gone a little off topic with all the interior panel discussion and rust repair. Maybe i should start a new thread?
 

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No thread worries, there aren't overbearing moderators here. You might get more notice from people who haven't been in your thread if you start new ones on a particular subject.

TL;DR: I'd run a 5W-40 that meets the A3/B3 standard. Some people differently. Longer below, I wrote you a book on oil:

Both viscosity numbers are important with oil. i.e. 10W-40, 5W-40, etc. The first number is how thick the oil is when cold. The "W" stands for "Winter". The second number is how thick it is when at operating temp (100 c). Don't confuse the "W" specification with "weight". One very important thing to know is that the two scales do NOT relate directly. If you were to measure the raw viscosity of a 5W oil when cold, it would be thicker than the 40 weight is hot!

That brings us to the first important point with oil: Test by the SAE should that around 85% of engine wear occurs at startup because your oil isn't flowing yet. You want your oil to get moving quickly. So, in general, a thinner oil is much better for your engine when cold. In fact, you will actually hear your cold engine spin faster at startup, especially in winter climates, which is better just to start at 0 degrees F. An oil that meets the 0W standard if probably best. Unfortunately that usually comes with other compromises, so read on.

On the hot side, thicker is better within reason, especially with turbo. A "40 weight" oil is still fairly thin hot. Drain yours when hot sometime and see. So, even a 50 weight would be good for our turbochargers and engines. But, once again, getting to 50 weight usually involves other compromises.

One more thing to know about oil weight ratings: They are a bar to clear, or get under. Like the high jump bar or the limbo bar. But, they come in ranges. So, an oil that's 5W-40 was thin enough cold to get under the 5W bar. How far under? The rating doesn't say, but not low enough to get under the 0W bar. You don't know any more from the package. You can read the "PDS" (Product Data Sheet) for most oils and see the actual raw viscosity ratings and compare. The same is true on top: a 5W-40 oil cleared the 40 weight bar when hot. But all that means is that it's between 40 weight and 50 weight.

Here's a real life example on weight: Mobil1 has a 0W-40. Great for mileage and cold start with the 0 weight. In order to get the cold side down to a 0W, they had to bring the top side down towards the bottom of the 40 weight range. So M1 0W-40 is a very thin 40 weight. On the other side, Shell Rottella T6 is a 5W-40 and they wanted good hot protection (it started as a diesel oil for large trucks). So, it just makes it under the 5W bar... but it's way over the 40 weight bar when hot.

The last thing to consider in weight is "tradition". Why did they always tell us in the old days to run 10W-30 or 10W-40 to protect our engines? Because they couldn't make a good 5W rated oil that hit at least 30 weight. We have to discard old notions about oil. In the USA, oil change intervals were always 3000 miles... yet cars sold in Europe were 10,000. The 3,000, which many owners still adhere to, are tied to old dino oils. I think 10,000 is extreme and is tied to marketing (advertising lower ownership costs or lower cost for dealer "free maint" programs on new purchases). The real number is somewhere in between as shown by user Oil Change Interval (OCI) testing in real life.

The last key characteristic of oils to know about is shear. Shear refers to an oil's viscosity essentially splitting or shearing when hot and stressed. The oil becomes lower viscosity. Once an oil shears, it doesn't unshear, ever. All oil shears, and it's really key because if your 40 weight becomes a 20 weight in 1000 miles, it's not protecting your engine. So there's a test to specify how resistent an oil is to shear called "HTHS" (High Temp High Shear). An A3/B3 rating tells you that an oil meets the shear strength test (Diesel standand CJ6 or higher is the same spec). (Also note that A4 is not better than A3, in fact it's worse).

Auto manufacturers like thin oils because they lead to higher MPG. Lower weight, less resistance, higher MPG. You'll get higher MPG with a 0W-20 than a 15W-50. But, your engine might not be protected. Still, they will tend to recommend the lowest weight that will protect the engine acceptably for the average driver. They don't want engines failing because they have to pay warranty claims and they also want a good reputation. OTOH, long warranties are only now becoming more common (100K, etc) so they compromise/balance claims and reputation vs. sales of higher MPG cars.

Special note for turbo owners: A lot of early turbo failures were from the bearings "coking" up. Synthetic oils, along with water cooling, helped tremendously with that. Saab was one of the first companies to push part or full synthetics. Also, turbos tend to need higher weights for protection... so while Honda rolls with 0W-20 and gets great MPG, Saab was at 0W-40.

Saab recommended 5W-30 for the NG900, then 5W-30 part synthetic when those came out, then 0W/5W-30 synthetic, then Mobil 1 0W-40 full synthetic ( I think including the brand on the last one was both availability and joint marketing $$).

ALL THAT SAID, what should our Saab Turbos use? We want an oil that protects our $$$ turbos. I like a 5W-40. I tried a 0W-40 in my car and it had all the good characteristics mentioned above with a 0W, but it used more oil. No doubt it had turbo oil seal or oil ring cylinder issues. I don't know which. But, with a 5W-40 it went away. Also, I saw a number of failures with M1 0W-40 when cars were pushed hard (dyno tests, long hot runs). That part is all subjective, but we know M1 0W-40 is on the thin side of 40 weight from the specs, so it's logical. You can also swap and use the thinner 0W-40 in winter and 5W-40 in summer for cold/hot start, but note that the hot side doesn't really change for your engine by season... your oil will be at least 100 degrees C in any season.


That doesn't mean M1 0W-40 is wrong for your engine or driving stye... just choose your compromise for MPG, start-up, protection. Some folks love it. In the USA, I suggest Shell Rotella T6 5W-40. It's on the thicker side, has great HTHS specs, and I compromise towards "protection". In Europe, Castrol has a good 5W-40 that meets A3/B3 and that's what I'd suggest.
 

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'96 SAAB NG900 SE (R.I.P.), '99 SAAB 9-3
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Discussion Starter #38
Should i switch over the rear lights from my NG900?
Which ones do you guys think look better?
IMG_20200221_135641.jpg IMG_20200221_135631.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
IMG_20200221_135858.jpg
The zinc spray seems to be struggling with the rust, but it's okay since all of this will be cut out.
What surprised me was the sponge in a bag that you can see through the hole, sound deadening i assume?
After i weld the panel i'll have to spray behind but i'm not sure if there's any access, i guess i'll find out.

Ps: i've found it's easier to post a picture from my phone and edit in the text later on my PC, so if you find a pic with no text it means that i'm editing the text in.
 
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