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New NGK plugs broken after 3 days

2582 Views 18 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  dre
Guys - 3 out of 4 NEW NGK plugs broke 3 days after install and using a backup DIC. There is a resulting 1312 / 1334 error code.

This ever happen even with a 'questionable' DIC ? The DIC is from my old car and was working when last used.

http://1drv.ms/1JfKyUo
http://1drv.ms/1JfKzHX

Plugs are for a 2005 9-5 aero: (napa, autozone, etc)

NGK GP Platinum/Spark Plug
Part Number: 7088
Alternate Part Number: BCPR6EGP
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Unless they were broken before you installed them (I'm guessing you wouldn't install cracked or broken plugs) then my guess is installation error.

There is nothing that can physically break the plugs once installed if done properly.

I have seen plugs fail where the ceramic meets the steel but the ceramic cracking like the ones pictured must have had some lateral forces applied at some point.

Did you use a spark plug socket with a rubber lining?
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Your DIC had nothing to do with this. Looks like physical damage, either before or during installation. I find it hard to suspect your install since the plugs are so easy to do, but I'm sure you would have seen cracking on at least one plug if the damage occurred before you bought them. Contact NGK, maybe they had a bad batch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Well, I've installed plugs many times before. Since this seems like a installation error, I'm still wondering how I managed to break 3 ?!?

I'll try the warranty on the plugs. I doubt the parts store will believe me.

thanks for the opinions/suggestions.
 

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I really doubt you broke them. Since you have done plugs before you know how easy they are on the 9-5. As long as the wrench you tightened them with was level with the engine when turning. The plugs you show have a non heat related fracture. The electrodes and the nose look fine for a new plug. Contact NGK customer support, they will tell you what went wrong.
 

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I'm not saying the socket you used is the problem but the construction of your socket compared to the one I have been using for the past thirty years is somewhat suspect.

The arrows I have inserted in your picture point to areas that have no bolt/plug contact area and can easily lead to leaning the wrench over when you are either torquing down or removing a bolt or spark plug.

Why any manufacturer would opt to remove so much surface area within the bolt/nut/plug chamber confounds me?

Is it that much cheaper to produce?

Okay I'm going to say it....that is a garbage socket!
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm not saying the socket you used is the problem but the construction of your socket compared to the one I have been using for the past thirty years is somewhat suspect.

The arrows I have inserted in your picture point to areas that have no bolt/plug contact area and can easily lead to leaning the wrench over when you are either torquing down or removing a bolt or spark plug.

Why any manufacturer would opt to remove so much surface area within the bolt/nut/plug chamber confounds me?

Is it that much cheaper to produce?

Okay I'm going to say it....that is a garbage socket!
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OK guys, giving this another shot. I bought 8 new plugs and a new DIC. If I somehow break 7 plugs I'll give my beloved '05 aero wagon to a more deserving soul. She deserves better.

I'll also compare my Costco "made in Taiwan" socket to Sears / NAPA. If it does suck, it'll be a good starter set for my younger brother. We're looking for a cheap 9-3 / 9-5 in South Florida.

thanks all !
 

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I'm not saying the socket you used is the problem but the construction of your socket compared to the one I have been using for the past thirty years is somewhat suspect.

The arrows I have inserted in your picture point to areas that have no bolt/plug contact area and can easily lead to leaning the wrench over when you are either torquing down or removing a bolt or spark plug.

Why any manufacturer would opt to remove so much surface area within the bolt/nut/plug chamber confounds me?

Is it that much cheaper to produce?

Okay I'm going to say it....that is a garbage socket!
.
I've seen those sockets before, and the manufacturer said it was so that they don't put pressure on the points, which is supposed to eliminate the chance of rounding off the fastener. They're designed to only put pressure on the flats.
 

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OK guys, giving this another shot. I bought 8 new plugs and a new DIC. If I somehow break 7 plugs I'll give my beloved '05 aero wagon to a more deserving soul. She deserves better.

I'll also compare my Costco "made in Taiwan" socket to Sears / NAPA. If it does suck, it'll be a good starter set for my younger brother. We're looking for a cheap 9-3 / 9-5 in South Florida.

thanks all ![/QUOTE

Dude dont buy that junk its a waste of money.
If you want to start working on your car the right way without frustration,
Buy Snapon Tools Period. Check fleabay or CL for used

1st thing metric wrench set
2nd 3/8 drive ratchet and chrome deep sockets
 

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That may be an explanation of sorts however I prefer a socket that mates properly and minimizes the chance that a lateral or misaligned force can occur....especially on spark plugs.
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Agreed. It seems clear what happened here ; plus most folks don't torque sparkplugs. 15 ft lbs. Where there is a compression gasket on the plug ( not all have that ) should torque then loosen the re torque. No one that I know or , when using spark plugs with a threaded top connection , remove the top connector, crimp the threads and re attach. BITD that top connector would unwind with vibration

Log style CPS or coil on plug bolted connectors certainly have Improved that issue. NGK have solid top connectors they are not threaded afaik.

If spark plugs are properly installed, dry threads, torqued, then I beleive that removing them will not be an issue ever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I reinstalled the plugs and one of the socket extensions is the only thing 'loose' I can see thats questionable. The socket fits snug (minimal to no movement) over the plug and theres no contact with the ceramic shell. Theres a rubber sleeve inside the socket.

However, one of my extensions has some movement with the socket and guessing this could contribute to the damaged plugs. Still, hand tightening without a lot of torque applied shouldn't result in breaking 3 plugs.


Thanks again all for the input.
 
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