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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I lost my haynes manual so of course I still tried to replace my front rotors on a 1987 900. I am only able to assume that the two 19 mm bolts on the back of the spindle will release the caliper and bracket that holds the pads and also prevents the rotor from coming off. I have looked eveywhere on this site and the only problem anyone has it seems is with the two rotor retaining torx screws. Of course I had to drill one of them out. Murphys law if you only have two bolts/screws/nuts one of them will end up stripped or rounded. So, how do I get the rotors off? I did get the lower bolt out and it appears it had been lock tited but the upper one rounded after using both hands a breaker bar my feet my wifes feet. It is now rounded. will I have to drill that out and what are the downsides to doing so if any. Please help
 

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with the rota - is it a front or rear handbrake car? - I think they changed some time in 87' so I guess your car could be either? When I last removed the disks from my car I did use the 19mm bolts to remove the callipers before removing the disks. My guess is the rota your trying to remove is stuck on the hub and a bit more force might shift it - provided of course you have clearance from the calliper.

With the ball joints the best advice is to drench them in WD40 over the course of a couple of days leading up to the job - this might be retrospective now as it sounds like your already well involved so probably best to get out the angle grinder and just shave the nuts of the bolts - any bolts you have not damaged should be drenched with WD40 several times before attempting to shift them - try not to damage the control-arm as you will have a whole-load more stuck bolts to undo if you need to replace that.

p.s. I know the WD40 thing sounds a little bit obvious but it really does work... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok so I have front e-brake and can't get enough clearance between the caliper and braket to remove the rotor. Can't get the rotor over the lugs. Now it appears the caliper, e-brake and the "braket" are all interconnected. The bracket which holds the outside brake pad and subsequently blocks the rotor then wraps around the back of the caliper where it is connected to a larger piston that slides into the back of the caliper that pushes out the smaller caliper piston so no matter how far I pull the backet out (it can only go so far anyway due to the bracket hitting the rubber seal on the larger piston) the caliper piston extends also. Now the two bolts that seem to attach the caliper are on the inside of the hub assembly just below where the brake line attaches to the caliper. They are 19mm. Now I haven't used pb blaster but I did WD40. There is no "nut" they deadend in the hub assembly and the one I did get out appeared to have been locktited. The one I couldn't get out is rounded and I don't have room to attach anything other then a socket so grinding would be next to impossible. First is there any easier way to get the rotor off and if not how do I go about drilling out the seized bolt
 

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So if I have it right, your problem really is a stuck caliper bolt that has been rounded off? I doubt you could ever remove the rotor without getting the caliper off the wheel...

The caliper bolts can be a REAL pain to remove, as they get the full brunt of any slush or salt or chemicals on the road. Plus, without a full lift, it can be awkward to get in there and get leverage.

A variety of methods exist to free a stuck bolt. Here are a few I've used:



  • Sometimes tightening a bolt slightly will get it to break loose.
  • Invest in a good quality 1/2" drive breaker bar that's at least a couple of feet long. Make sure to use a high quality adapter if you're using with 3/8" drive sockets.
  • Hammering on a slightly smaller hex socket (SAE instead of metric?) can sometimes work on a rounded bolt.
  • Alternating heat (butane torch) and cold (water) to get the bolt to expand and contract enough times to break the rust seal
  • Tapping or hammering on the bolt head to get the seal to break.
  • A combination of all of the above
Of course, using PB Blaster liberally will be a good idea as well. I think it does a better job than WD40. I would definitely avoid getting it on the rubber brake lines, though.

Finally, when it comes time to reassemble everything, make sure to put some anti-sieze on those caliper bolts so the next time some poor slob has to work on them, there's a decent chance they will come off in less than half a day!

good luck.
 

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Sears carries special "bolt-out" nuts. I see that the sets carry a nut to fit 19mm. I suggest going to sears with the bolt you have taken out and ask if you can see if it will fit. You might have a 50/50 chance.

Here's a link to the "bolt-out" set. $49.99

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00952162000&subcat=Bolt-Out%2C+Taps+%26+Dies

Here's another $29.99

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00952166000&subcat=Bolt-Out%2C+Taps+%26+Dies

I own 2 of these sets and they work great! The trick is getting it to bite in, then it's all muscle.

I've even used these on bolts with heads that broke off. It can be completely round.
 

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And, if you still can't get a turn on the bolt (due to the rounded head) you could weld a suitable nut onto the top of the bolt and use that to turn it. You'll need to have done all the other stuff to break the seal and such first though.
 
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