SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got an '06 9-5 Sport without Navigation. One of my rear deck speakers is blown, and I'd like to replace it with a direct fit - which I belive are 6x9's.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

I've searched on here, but I don't know the differences in the sizes and years to base a purchase on the previous posts I've read. Also, I don't know if the 9-3 and 9-5 have the same OHM and size speakers in the deck. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,662 Posts
paper cones aren't all that bad, but the paper surrounds are junk.

If all that is wrong with your speakers is the surrounds torn then I'd put new surrounds on them.

you can buy them lots of places, I got mine here:

http://www.speakerworks.com/6_by_9_inch_speaker_repair_kit_p/swk69a.htm

If you smoked the voice coil this won't help you, but the vast majority of speaker failures are surround rips/tears
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for both suggestions. I thought about repairing the speaker, but buying a used one is much less work and only $30 more.

However, I do like the idea of upgrading them while I'm back there.
I see that most upgrade them with 2 and 3 way speakers, so they are no longer just subs. How does this work out with the sound clarity and balance?

If I don't go with the stock speaker, I've seen a recommendation on here for both of these. Maybe an upgrade is the way to go, since I might keep the 9-5 a while.

- Infinity Kappa 6929i 2 way



- Infinity Reference 9632cf 2 way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,662 Posts
if you put a 2-way or 3-way speaker in the back, the extra stuff is just added weight. There is a crossover in the amp that filters out all but the bass that goes to those speakers.

When my son fried the VC's in his rear deck speakers I bought a used set of pioneer 6x9 speakers on line that had blown tweeters in them and just took the tweeters off. They're 4-ohm loads and not the 2-ohm loads that the amp expects so they're not quite as loud but other than that they fit and work fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
if you put a 2-way or 3-way speaker in the back, the extra stuff is just added weight. There is a crossover in the amp that filters out all but the bass that goes to those speakers.

When my son fried the VC's in his rear deck speakers I bought a used set of pioneer 6x9 speakers on line that had blown tweeters in them and just took the tweeters off. They're 4-ohm loads and not the 2-ohm loads that the amp expects so they're not quite as loud but other than that they fit and work fine
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
paper cones aren't all that bad, but the paper surrounds are junk.

If all that is wrong with your speakers is the surrounds torn then I'd put new surrounds on them.

you can buy them lots of places, I got mine here:

http://www.speakerworks.com/6_by_9_inch_speaker_repair_kit_p/swk69a.htm

If you smoked the voice coil this won't help you, but the vast majority of speaker failures are surround rips/tears
Was it hard to do the swap? I look at mine today, and I noticed the outer edge of where the paper surround sits is very narrow, seems like it would be difficult to glue anything to there. I take it the speaker works just fine with the foam surround as opposed to the paper one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
Was it hard to do the swap? I look at mine today, and I noticed the outer edge of where the paper surround sits is very narrow, seems like it would be difficult to glue anything to there. I take it the speaker works just fine with the foam surround as opposed to the paper one?
Here's a video I did about replacing the speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
Was it hard to do the swap? I look at mine today, and I noticed the outer edge of where the paper surround sits is very narrow, seems like it would be difficult to glue anything to there. I take it the speaker works just fine with the foam surround as opposed to the paper one?
I replaced the speaker entirely with a higher quality sounding speaker. It's not hard to do the foam surround swap, but I figured after all these years the paper would be getting pretty brittle, so I opted to just upgrade instead and haven't looked back since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Was it hard to do the swap? I look at mine today, and I noticed the outer edge of where the paper surround sits is very narrow, seems like it would be difficult to glue anything to there. I take it the speaker works just fine with the foam surround as opposed to the paper one?
I ended up replacing the surround about a month back. Total costs to me was less than 5 bucks. Three bucks for the surround itself, and 2 bucks for a small tube of aleene's tacky glue from walmart. It was actually really easy to do. There is a plastic retainer that sits above the old surround that you have to gently pry off and clean. This reveals a generous amount of space to glue in the new surround. Old surround was made out of paper and was extremely tattered. I cut it off as close to the cone as I could, and then used the scalpel to scrape off the old surround from the cone. Then I glued and set the new surround into the correct spot, and placed a book on top to keep pressure. Its been working fine ever since.

I'd say it was an easy job. If I ever end up doing the other speaker I will take some pictures for you guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hey Summerheat,

Looking for some guidance on replacing this surround before I do it. First will you link me to the surround you used? Now for the job, the plastic retainer that you pried off, did you replace it after installing the new surround? I'm guessing you did since you mentioned cleaning it up. Also wondering the order you did the gluing. Like did you first glue the surround to the cone then let that set then glue it to the outer edge that the plastic retainer was attached to? Then if you replaced the retainer did you glue that back down on top of the new surround? Or what did the process look like for you? Sorry I have never done this before and just wondering how you went about it since you were able to do it successfully.

Finally, did you resilicone the speaker back down when reinstalling it? I'm wondering if this is necessary to do in order to prevent it from vibrating?
Thanks
I ended up replacing the surround about a month back. Total costs to me was less than 5 bucks. Three bucks for the surround itself, and 2 bucks for a small tube of aleene's tacky glue from walmart. It was actually really easy to do. There is a plastic retainer that sits above the old surround that you have to gently pry off and clean. This reveals a generous amount of space to glue in the new surround. Old surround was made out of paper and was extremely tattered. I cut it off as close to the cone as I could, and then used the scalpel to scrape off the old surround from the cone. Then I glued and set the new surround into the correct spot, and placed a book on top to keep pressure. Its been working fine ever since.

I'd say it was an easy job. If I ever end up doing the other speaker I will take some pictures for you guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Hey Summerheat,

Looking for some guidance on replacing this surround before I do it. First will you link me to the surround you used? Now for the job, the plastic retainer that you pried off, did you replace it after installing the new surround? I'm guessing you did since you mentioned cleaning it up. Also wondering the order you did the gluing. Like did you first glue the surround to the cone then let that set then glue it to the outer edge that the plastic retainer was attached to? Then if you replaced the retainer did you glue that back down on top of the new surround? Or what did the process look like for you? Sorry I have never done this before and just wondering how you went about it since you were able to do it successfully.

Finally, did you resilicone the speaker back down when reinstalling it? I'm wondering if this is necessary to do in order to prevent it from vibrating?
Thanks
I'm in Canada, and I went to a local store to pick one up:
If your looking to buy online, I was about to purchase this one. It also comes with the glue:

No need to replace the retainer, I actually don't even know where you'd get another one, so be careful when prying the old one off. When you pry the retainer off it comes off with a bunch of the old paper surround glued all over it. I just used a scalpel scrape it all off.

Order of gluing:
1. I glued the inside edge of the surround to the paper speaker cone. Then I put a book on top of it to keep pressure.
2. After that has dried I glued the outer edge of the surround to the speaker housing. Then I also put a layer of glue on top of the outer edge of the surround and stuck the retainer back on. I used a bunch of clothes pins to keep it clamped in place as it dried.

I did not re-silicone anything.

Hope this helps, good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I'm running these JBL's. Absolutely love the sound quality.
 

·
Registered
2005 9-5 2.3t
Joined
·
3 Posts
Here's a video I did about replacing the speakers.
Hey. Did you ever do a wiring video? I wanted to know if you got the speakers fully functional or just the bass. I bought some Kickers but they dont sound all that great. The front seat area is waaay louder. Anything helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I never did a wiring video since I just used the existing wiring. The amp sends only bass to the rear, that's all. It sounds like you have 4 ohm speakers which are less sensitive than the factory 2 ohm or whatever weird ohm they were so the volume won't be as loud since 4 ohms isn't as sensitive to the signal input. The JBL speakers I got are 2.4 ohms if I recall correctly so they're close enough to the factory rear deck speakers, just with much tighter bass control.
 

·
Registered
2005 9-5 2.3t
Joined
·
3 Posts
I never did a wiring video since I just used the existing wiring. The amp sends only bass to the rear, that's all. It sounds like you have 4 ohm speakers which are less sensitive than the factory 2 ohm or whatever weird ohm they were so the volume won't be as loud since 4 ohms isn't as sensitive to the signal input. The JBL speakers I got are 2.4 ohms if I recall correctly so they're close enough to the factory rear deck speakers, just with much tighter bass control.
I went on Crutchfield and purchased those kickers. I got this.
273007

Do you know how to splice input and output cables to get the speakers to work like they should? Would you recommend it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I don't think there's a point in doing that. You won't have the wattage to drive the speakers properly since you'll be bypassing the amp and the head unit only does 25 watts which are already used by the rear door and dash speakers. There's nothing wrong with having just bass coming out. My JBLs are 2 way speakers. The crossover is built into the speaker, the tweeters won't activate because the frequency isn't there.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top