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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Saabers,
is there an elegant way to move the fuse box a bit to get access to the internal area of the wheel arch for rust treatment?
I have found the connectors to the passenger area, but how can I loosen the front and rear engine wiring looms without getting into a cable nightmare?
Thanks for your help
Andreas
 

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If you can disconnect from the cabin, then you should probably just lift the box out of the way with the engine loom still attached. That should give the necessary access.

BTW, I was told that the use of "schultz" body sealer is fatal to our C900 wheel arches. The angle is so tight that it's impossible to get the stuff all the way in so a void exists for water to get in and corrode. The proper rustproofing method for the arches is to douse the area with Waxoyl and heat the arch with a hot air gun until the wax flows into the angle. Add more waxoyl then and they'll never rust...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
cables & rust

Thanks a lot for the info. I have gone as far as undoing the bolts in the fusebox, and unplugging from the passenger department, but this did not seem to make the box easily moveable. Are there any other fixings, or do I just have to be more bold? The engine looms are routed through holes in the metal next to the box, do I have to loosen them and then pull them in as I lift the box? My main question is basically, do the wiring looms link to plugs under the box, or are they hardwired?

I had been hoping that this was a frequent problem with a straightforward solution, not some kind of brain surgery ;-)

As for the rustproofing, that is also very important info to use Waxoyl & heat. For the first step of killing the old rust, I was planning to use a water based rust converter named Fertan. This stuff wins every comparative test done by the German classic motoring press, and penetrates everywhere where water does. Can be followed by wax, resins or whatever. So I guess I'll do Fertan and hot Waxoyl. I'll tell you in a couple of years if it worked ;-)
In case somebody is interested, this company even provides a free guidebook for rustproofing classics, unfortunately for most of you only in german....

Cheers
Andreas
 

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If the rust has progressed to the point where uyou've noticed it.. it's well advanced.. 'rust stoppers' work.. for a while. Oily/wax is good at keeping out water but once rust is setlled in it's Oxygen you've gotta keep out.
Hopefully this work may delay for a year or 2.. but the writing is on the wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sure,
but it is easy enough to do the converter stuff (once I have the fuse box out :cheesy:), and the only alternative is welding in new wings, isn't it?
I should have bought a better specimen in the first place.....
Cheers
Andreas
 

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Yours is a 'vert isn't it? If so, make sure that the windscreen frame struts that are welded to the inner wheel arches are connected to solid metal. These provide your main protection in the event of a rollover so you want to make sure everything is good and sound down there...

As for getting the engine loom out of the way, did you undo the actual fuse/relay socket plate from within the fuse box. There may be connectors parked out of the way in there...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well,
I just tried to lift this plate a bit after undoing the internal bolts, and faced a rather scary type of cable spaghetti. All this is still inside the actual plastic box.
Is there anybody listening out there who has ever changed the front wings? In that case the fuse box must be moved somehow?

Thanks for pointing out the window frame issue, I hope it is not that bad .....
Cheers
Andreas
 

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Right. Just had to do this on a car I'm stripping.

The lower fuse box extends down into the innder wing further than you think. There are four captive bolts set into the box, which secure it to the inner wing plate. You have to remove the carpet and trim in the bonnet release handle area before you can see them.

You'll probably also have to remove the lower dash (kick) panel - couldn't say for sure as that's already been removed from my parts car.

I found and undid two of the captive bolts, but couldn't see the third. it's definitely in there though - I left it behind when I got pissed off and wrenched the box out of the inner wing.

This is a ******* of a job!

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, Matthew!
Could you give me any hint as to where in relation to the other two bolts the third one is? I assume you did not take pics of the broken box ;-)

How did you undo the engine wiring looms? Do they unplug?
Thanks again & best wishes
Andreas
 

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Totalled up, I think it probably took me two full days of work to strip all the wiring from that car :evil: When I started, I thought it'd be useful to have a car's worth of wiring and automotive connectors.

There seem to be four (or was it five?) distinct wiring looms in these cars. One behind the dashboard; one for the inside body of the car; one for the LH system and one for other electrical devices in the engine bay.

I can truly understand why cars are written off due to wiring loom damage. You have to strip out everything to get the looms out!

Just so happens I do still have the fuse box, and so here are a few snaps for you:

Side view of the fuse box. This side bolts against the outside side of the inner wing. You can see three fixings: top right, just above the loom that enters the side of the box; middle, just below and left of the side loom; and bottom right. Notice that the last fastener position is just a hole in the plastic box. That is the fastener I couldn't locate and got ripped out when I finally lost patience.


Top right fastener:


Middle and bottom left fasteners. The three rectangular holes are for the black, red and white multi-plugs (not shown):


Where the fuse box fits in the inner wing space. You can just see all three bolt holes:


Top left bolt hole close up


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well written matthew!

i took the wings off my old parts car and removed the fuse box to do this. I remember it being tricky finding those bolts to get them off!

I think that fuse box is one of the first things that goes into the car! - then the dash is added infront of it!. I had the complete dash stripped out too, so it was as easy as possible.

Once you find all the bolts and have unplugged the big connectors, the fuse box should lift out of the way while still attached to the engine loom. If it is hard to pull it out of the inner wing then you have missed a bolt/screw!
 

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The wiring loom that exists from the side of the box runs through a cutout in the inner wing, and across the engine bay. To remove the fuse box you have to disconnect that loom so you can pull it through the cutout when you lift away the fuse box.

Interesting how that cavernous fuse box hides a multitude of previous-owner wiring sins :eek:

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks so much!

Matthew,
thanks so much for the pics, you are a whizz with the camera. Have you ever considered to rewrite the Classic 900 manual with proper pics ? ;-)

Tomarse, also thanks a lot for the info. Am I understanding the two of you correctly that the way forward is to get access to under the dash, remove the three wiring plugs and retaining bolts, and then lift up the box?
I take it that I will not remove any wiring from engine looms to the box (?). Any recommendation how to loosen them enough to get the box far enough out of the way to get proper access to the interior of the wing? Will removing cable clips do or is there anything else to remove?

If one day I'll get the engine out for overhaul, would this make the loom job easier, or is it fixed in many other tricky ways?

I was not sure if I was getting on everybodies nerves by persisting with this question (I had posted earlier with little reply), but it appears to me that this is a nasty bit of work that most people like to avoid. Thanks that you provided good info now!
Best wishes
Andreas
 
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