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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
does anyone else think the front end seems to ride too high on our linears? i don't think i've noticed it on the aeros that i've seen, but on my car, there is a definite gap between the front wheels and the fender that is not there on the rear wheels. is this normal? I am about to get rims/tires and tinted windows around the back of the car, and i would like to not have this same gap. should i get the front lowered, or is this normal??? it looks kinda funny...
 

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my 92x 2.5i is the same

my 2.5i is the same, i think it's fine, cause 9-2x 2.5i engine is heavy compare to the 2.0 turbo. so saab set the spring higher. 9-2x is front heavy less problem when u hit bumps or ramp
 

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The 9-2X isn't manufactured by Honda. The car is based off an honest to god rally car frame and has more clearance than some small trucks. Add in AWD and you have a go-anywhere car.

Front suspensions have to allow steering movement as well as normal compression. When you are turning the wheel at maximum rotation and hit a bump, the suspension has to allow enough clearance to keep the wheel from rubbing. This is why front suspensions need more gap than rear.

You can lower your car and reduce the gap with stiffer springs -- but that will have an adverse affect on ride quality. Many aftermarket springs are designed for looks and will not improve performance. Some springs will do both. Be careful about what you are buying and know what you want before you make any changes.

If looks trump functionality, check out tein S-tech springs.

I wouldn't touch them with a ten foot pole.
 

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It's not just the linear, my Aero also sits lower in the back.



 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks everyone. i know about the stuff available for aftermarket suspension upgrades, was just wondering if many people had lowered the front, and i was only considering a half inch or an inch max. i'll probably leave it the same as it was, but i might go for a stiffer ride. i know that bumps-wise it'll be worse, but i'd like to get rid of the remnants of body-roll, and if i add nicer tires and a suspension upgrade, then i ought to have one heck of a fun to drive car. nice to know i'm not the only one with the problem.
 

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Double_0_7 said:
i'd like to get rid of the remnants of body-roll
Springs are not a good way to tackle body-roll. And when I say "not a good way" I mean that it won't work.

A good rear sway bar and possibly front sway bar will fix the roll issues.

However, stiff springs will enable you to go waaay overboard on the swaybar sizes.
 

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Isn't there a point where going to stiff on sway bars isn't good for the seems on a uni-body car?

Not tryignt o thread hijack, it jsut seems appropriate.
 

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Aegon said:
Springs are not a good way to tackle body-roll. And when I say "not a good way" I mean that it won't work.

A good rear sway bar and possibly front sway bar will fix the roll issues.

However, stiff springs will enable you to go waaay overboard on the swaybar sizes.
Why wouldn't stiffer springs reduce roll?
 

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Airboy said:
Why wouldn't stiffer springs reduce roll?
Because they would need to be so stiff they didn't travel at all.

From the whiteline website (whiteline is one of the most trusted Subaru aftermarket brands):
http://www.whiteline.com.au/default.asp?page=/springs.htm

Whiteline said:
Springs should not be designed to limit body roll. When the vehicle is in roll the spring needs to be soft enough to absorb bumps. If the spring is stiff enough to control roll then it will be far too stiff when you have roll and a bump at the same time. The result again would be a car that jumps around requiring constant steering adjustments.
 

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Aegon said:
Because they would need to be so stiff they didn't travel at all.

From the whiteline website (whiteline is one of the most trusted Subaru aftermarket brands):
http://www.whiteline.com.au/default.asp?page=/springs.htm

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I guess it is a matter of degree and/or definition then. What does it mean to "control roll"? When you use lowering springs, the rate should be higher to prevent bottoming the suspension. Stiffer springs will reduce roll. Stiffer springs plus swaybar will reduce roll more. The way I understand it, swaybars 'borrow' from the springs on the inside while cornering to reduce roll, right? How much would the effective rate change? I would think that it is a fraction of the original spring rate.
 

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I found the same thing in the impreza, although i think it is owed to the rally nature of the car.
 

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Airboy,

You are partly right that stiffer springs will reduce roll. But the amount of stiffness you need to add to effectively reduce roll is so great that you won't end up with springs, but rather coiled and unmoveable bricks. This means you are riding without a suspension, and it would suck for both performance and comfort.

Swaybars do more than just borrow stiffness from their neighboring spring -- they also compress the neighbor spring proportionally to the compression of the donor. So, instead of having 4" of compression on one side and 0" on the other when you hit a pothole, it would end up having 3" compression on one side and 1" on the other. The total difference is only two inches of roll with one inch of drop on both sides (vs 4" of roll with 0 compression). This example is fake, but the point can still be taken from it.

Stiffer springs will have a small impact on reducing body roll. Swaybars will have a large impact.
 

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I am not suggesting using spring stiffness instead of swaybars but rather that springs can make a noticeable difference. Whether this change is effective or significant, I can't say since it depends on the user.

I just installed some of these
Subaru springs to lower the car by 0.5-0.75" and noticed the change in body roll. It could be the lower center of gravity and/or the placebo effect but, the linked page indicated that the stiffness increased 50-100%. That sounds pretty significant and yet the ride was not harsh at all.

That said, I will still be upsizing the 13mm rear swaybar shortly. :D
 

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I had an 03 WRX. When I put STi struts and springs on it the car still had issues with roll (far less than the saab, due to the 20mm stock swaybar).

I went bigger on the swaybar and added endlinks to great effect.

My own personal experience showed that the swaybars affect roll and springs don't. Combine that with the results that Whiteline has shown and I believe it.
 

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I browsed through the link to Whiteline and found this:

http://www.whiteline.com.au/default...ge=/springs.htm

"In all cases our springs are between 15-50% heavier in rate than standard to deliver a reduce squat, reduced body roll on turn and a reduction in braking nose dive will provide a pleasing, flatter squarer look on the road. Remember actual finished ride heights may vary between standard and factory sports options."

:D
 

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Marketing wrote your quote, engineering wrote mine :cheesy:

I'm just joking around. I think this thread has been fun. But my experience says that springs do next to nothing compared to swaybars.

The statement is true. Springs do help reduce roll. They just don't do it well.
 

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What's up Aegon..

Nice discussion here.... :)

Just put Whiteline RSB on the 92X.
Damn that car feels a lot better now....
 
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