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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am a novice on the topic of lightbulbs so can anyone from UK help.

I wish to buy brighter bulbs for my 2004 Arc which has standard bulbs. I sinmply want a brighter and longer beam than I already have.

I have the adjuster function but not the auto dip on the newer style lights.

What can I do for cheap money, and that which is road legal.

I am really confused by ebay!

Also don't want any silly messages messing up my electrics with odd choices which obviously draw too much current!

Any ideas?

Thanks

Daniel
 

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HID kit ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi,

thanks for that, but to be clear are we talking legal in UK or US?

I only need legal for UK!

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Right then, onto ebay....

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SAAB-9-3-9-5-...arts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM?hash=item587f16e9fe

or

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SAAB-9-5-95-X...arts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM?hash=item20b01a0601


These look like a direct swap, is that what I want as there are also these kits which cost a lot mroe?

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/H7-6000K-HID-...arts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM?hash=item3a59191d8f

Any ideas.

Also what is the max current flow that you can put through the light system before you trip the ECU check function?

thanks I am a novice to this!

Oh and I found these as well...

http://www.care4car.com/productdisp...lips_Xtreme_Power_+80percent_xenon_bulbs.html


finally is there an issue with autolevelling, as I thought you had to have this fitted to not fail MOT as you glare other motorists?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Actually I think that will just buy some bulbs looking at this article...

HID xenon bulbs are quite a recent development in automotive lighting technology. The HID stands for High Intensity Discharge, which refers to the unique way in which the bulbs produce their light. Unlike ordinary halogen headlight bulbs, HID xenon bulbs do not contain a conventional metal filament, so in order to ignite the xenon gas and metal halide within the glass bulb a very high voltage spark is needed which is delivered by two electrodes.
The high voltage that is used to generate the spark is around 20,000 volts, which is considerably higher than a car's normal 12 volt supply and so a metal box, called a ballast unit, is fitted to help boost the voltage. Once the spark has been generated and the bulb is illuminated the voltage drops down to a steady 85 volts.
The xenon gas belongs to the group of elements known as the noble gases, and is held within a single sealed glass tube above the base of the bulb. When ignited the xenon helps to produce a light that is 300% brighter than halogen, and because the light is also much whiter it more closely resembles natural daylight.
The bulbs used in HID xenon headlights typically last around 3000 to 4000 hours and when they do finally fail they normally give a warning by flickering intermittently before eventually failing to light up at all. It is possible to change these xenon bulbs yourself, however because of the high voltages associated with HID systems always make sure the electrical power is off, and if you are at all unsure arrange to have the work carried out by a qualified mechanic or auto technician.
When buying replacement HID bulbs you may be surprised at their high price, especially when compared to standard halogen headlight bulbs, however they do not have to be replaced in pairs and because of their exceptional service life they do still offer great value for money. There is also now a growing range of upgrade HID xenon bulbs that allow you to personalise the night time appearance of your car. Whilst the standard HID bulbs produce a white light with a yellow tint, upgrade xenon bulbs are available in blue, purple or pure white tints.
Because they produce such a bright light many drivers wonder whether HID Xenon bulbs are actually road legal. Well the simple answer is that they are completely road legal if they are part of a manufacturer's factory fitted HID lighting system. It is possible to buy aftermarket kits that upgrade standard halogen headlights to HID xenon bulbs, however at present the law does state that these type of HID conversion kits are not legal.

If you have HID Xenon Headlight Bulbs fitted to your vehicle then you will appreciate the effects that they have on the light output from your headlights, especially on dark unlit roads. If however, your vehicle does not have HID xenon lights fitted as standard, you can still upgrade to xenon by fitting high performance Car Bulbs, which emit more light than standard auto bulbs.



http://ezinearticles.com/?How-Do-HID-Xenon-Bulbs-Work-and-Are-They-Road-Legal?&id=2233501
 

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you have headlamp washers, wipers, adjustable headlamps, metal glass and a good beam pattern. i've done around 8k of night driving since fitted mine. i leave them on during the day too. never been pulled. passed mot. volvos and hondas and nissans and renaults all have models with hid with no prjector. the man at the MOT centre said he new mine were aftermarket but the beam pattern was better than some oem hids. honestly he said that. also, you need self levelling headlamps, or self levelling rear suspension. saab was one of the only brands to offer self levelling rear suspension, it is a factory option. not standard. but.... if police ever pull you over just tell them you have self levelling rear suspension. i doubt they'll jump on the back of your car to check. even if you have to take them out, worst scenario reslistically is you would be given a three week ticket to get rid of them, no fine if you oblige.
just get 35w 4300k and you will never have an issue. 6000k and above starts getting blue=noticable to cops, even though some oem are 6kk. stick to 35w for low beams.
just buy cheap ebay ones from some thats got positive feedback and a UK SELLER. i had a faulty ballast from hong come and the company "omgsocoolhid" or something just ignored me.
oh, your car is 04, glass lenses. no worries. problem solved. job done. boom.
 

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For some reason I always read GF as Girl Friend.........

Kinda different context that way! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Interesting comments thanks for that. I went in Halfords and they seem to do brighter bulbs for £22 each which seems a lot.

But looking some more I found this which maybe makes me think that I need a proper HID kit and not a fake bulb?

Also not sure about self levelling as I don't want to dazzle other drivers, maybe have to think about it!



"Blue" Headlights
But what of other blue headlights? The aftermarket is absolutely teeming with blue headlight bulbs today. Most of them are HID headlight emulators. These "cool blue" fake HID lights are merely tungsten-halogen bulbs with a blue tint added, producing a bluish headlight. Unfortunately, blue is the shortest light wavelength. Consequently, this blue light dissipates quickly, producing more glare from fog, rain, and snow. For this and other reasons, non-white headlights are illegal for road use in the U.S., Canada, and many other countries. There is however another, legal, version of the "blue" headlight bulb. This one has a gold color on its glass. The coloring is not a tint but a special color filter, which blocks the yellow in the bulb's light, producing a whiter output. The reduction of the halogen's yellow output brings as a byproduct a slightly blue cast, just as the yellow's inherent absence in the HID headlight makes its color slightly blue. However, the two systems get their blue byproduct from different sources, and unlike the HID, the overall light from this &qiot;ultra-white&qiot; tungsten-halogen bulb is sharply reduced. The major color in the incandescent headlight’s light remember is yellow. Therefore, with the yellow spectrum blocked, less light reaches the road. These lower-output bulbs are, surprisingly, legal because they conform to the government regulations specifying white light. Unfortunately, the light they output is actually less bright than that from standard tungsten-halogen headlights.
"Xenon" Headlights
To further confuse the issue, some companies are advertising "Xenon" headlight bulbs. These aren't anything special. They are merely tungsten-halogen bulbs that have xenon added to their halogen gas. Xenon is the best gas to have inside an incandescent bulb. It has larger atoms that are better at bouncing evaporated tungsten atoms back onto the filament, with the result significantly improved bulb life. However, this is not a special bulb at all, as all of the newest tungsten-halogen bulbs are made to this specification, not just a few company’s offerings. Even more of a problem is the confusion that results from the use of the word "Xenon" for different kinds of headlight bulbs. Late model (H7) tungsten-halogen bulbs are mistakenly called Xenon, as are also HIDs, even though that is not the correct name for either of them, and they are completely different bulbs. One has a filament and the other doesn't.
 
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