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1992 9000 aero running a 97 engine and drivetrain. 242,xxx mi

I have a leak in the washer fluid reservoir. Appears the did a good job tucking this away. Is this accessed through the passenger side wheel well?
 

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The front section of the wheel well has to come off and also the brake cooling scoop. The tank is above the scoop. It is secured to the body by two studs - the nuts for which are located on the engine side of the body wall. One is easy to get off (the rear one) and one is a PITA (the forward one).



This one is easy enough to access:



But this one is tough:



The image above shows the stud with the bumper, spoiler and lower air deflector removed so it looks deceivingly easy. If you don't want to make all those removals, try making a really long extension and feeding it in from the LH side of the engine compartment - all the way across the back of the turbo charger - and onto the nut. You can look down in the tiny space between the inner wall of the body and the auxiliary pulleys and see the nut (but you can't get a wrench on it - I least I couldn't). Once you get the socket on, just crank the nut off and then you can drop the tank.

A word of advice on this job, if I may. I would not even bother pulling the leaker - until you have a replacement bottle on hand. These bottles cannot be repaired. The the plastic shell is formed very tightly around the studs and over time they get rusty. As the rust accumulates, the diameter of the stud expands until eventually it pushes out enough to crack the plastic around it. The studs can't be removed without destroying the shell and no type of sealant will adhere to the type of ABS plastic that the bottle is formed from.

And, unfortunately, it is pretty hard to find a good used one.
 

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Are you sure that tank is leaking?
99% of all "tank leaks" are actually non return valve leak. This valve is located under tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's a good point. No, I don't really know whether it is the tank or the valve. Can the return valve be purchased and replaced separately?
 

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That's a good point. No, I don't really know whether it is the tank or the valve. Can the return valve be purchased and replaced separately?
Oh boy, sorry for all the unnecessary info - I thought you had confirmed the source of the leak as coming from the bottle.

Oftentimes, the leakage is simply due to a hose that has popped off a fitting, a pump discharge nipple or the hard plastic tube that runs to the sprayers. You can diagnose an open line by operating the two (front & rear) systems. Instead of delivering washer fluid to its associated glass, a system with a disconnected line will deliver the fluid directly to the garage floor.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, and sorry too. I just assumed it was a cracked reservoir. I filled it when I got the car and the front worked ok...I don't think anything came out the rear though.

After the car sat for a while after washing the front window, I noticed the puddle of washer fluid on the ground.

I'll need to get in through the wheel well and take a look to see exactly what I am dealing with. I am hoping its a hose/valve issue. The reservoir seems like a lot of effort for the problem. I was actually going to see about installing a secondary reservoir and gravity feed it to the tube going out the bottom of the original reservoir. I'll report back my findings.
 

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My crack, rearward stud socket, viewed through the pump hole. Any suggestions appreciated!

20200816_125111.jpg
 

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Pull it off and hot stitch it. I use this technique in the door panel repair video. Use some natural color zip ties to add filler as needed. Use a large chisel-tip soldering iron around 750F/400C to melt Vs across the crack. Fill the V back in with the original plastic that rolls out, along with a small amount of new nylon from the zip tie. Do not breathe the fumes, they are toxic. I have a spare washer tank from my Genesis Coupe I can crack and repair on video if it would help.
 

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Often getting the reservoir Out isn't worth the Candle. Fill in that tube bit with Urethane Caulking ..
It will form a reasonable plug.... It's only washer fluid and only under gravity pressure.
And even in a worst case scenario where it eventually weeps a tiny bit . Who really cares ;)
 

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Not much will stick to that nylon. Urethane will hang for a while but after a bunch of heat/cool cycles it will release from the plastic. YMMV.
 

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Thanks for the offer Ryengoth, your description suffices so don't go to the trouble on my account. If you ever do, I'd certainly stand in line to watch the vid!

That photo is in the spare bottle - I don't know what I face when I look at the one in the car.....
 

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Thanks for the offer Ryengoth, your description suffices so don't go to the trouble on my account. If you ever do, I'd certainly stand in line to watch the vid!

That photo is in the space bottle - I don't know what I face when I look at the one in the car.....
Once I am done with the dash crack repairs I will do some nylon 66 repairs. I think there is an old fuel tank from a blower as well. Both are nylon 66 like the washer reservoir. Urethane sealant will work for a while. What fluid mix due you usually use in the winter?
 

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Guess this went on the back burner.

I had a look at mine today and the leak was the NRV on the forward pump. It had a pinhole on one face. I suppose the diaphragm was ruptured.

Needless to say I left everything else alone. I did find that I could get a 1/4 " socket on both nuts from the wheel arch, the rear one easily, the forward only slightly less so. Another option would be reaching under the compressor with a long driver. It is suggested to grind flats on the two rods, to hold them still when removing the (probably) rusted nuts. Access to the forward rod would be awkward.

I'd suggest removing the wheel arch edge trim to facilitate removing/refitting the arch liner, as it uses the same bolts around the edge.
 

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I've been testing Polyvance's FiberFlex welding rod on various plastics. It adheres to urethane, ABS and bakelite very well so far. I'll be testing Nylon 66 next to see if it can be used for external repair of tank leaks and mounting tabs.
 
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