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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, my fuel pump is well and truly blown and I'd like to put in a new one. Before everyone suggests I should cut a hole in the back seat, I at least want to fully explore the idea of dropping the tank. First question is about getting the back of the car into the air. The car is a 00 convertible and sadly quite rusty below having lived in England and its salty roads.

Aside from the normal jacking points, where can I lift the car? I've seen videos on YouTube of people changing out their tanks but they've placed the jack stands on the rear axle and I seriously don't like that idea. There is a small uneven area at the axle bolts, but I'm not sure how suitable it is. I normally use ramps, but obviously can't now. The other concern is having enough room to swing the tank out passed any jack at the jacking point.

Fuel tank is at least 2/3s full, which is another issue. The condition of the filler pipe (and is it an overflow pipe?) is not great, looks perished, and the jubilee clips rusted. Indeed the tank strap bolts don't look amazing, same for the fuel filter's banjo bolts.

Frankly I don't want to touch any of it, but if I could get the car safely into the air I would feel an awful lot better. I really don't want to cut a hole in the floor (I know all the benefits but I'm a pedantic git), but equally I don't want to get under a car or touch a fuel tank without being safe.

Many thanks.
 

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well if you have ramps that's more of an easy way to get it high enough so you can drop it with ease. Given that you said it could be quite rusty underneath be prepared for lots of breakage. The bonus to enlarging the whole which is already under the rear seat is you don't need to drain the tank ,you can do it in the rain. no rust problems, the list goes on. when your done you can cover it with ice and water shield like they use to seal roofs",grace" makes a good one sticky on one side and smooth on the other. and sticks like hell. all in it's about 30-40 min swap.
 

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I also never planned to cut to access the pump. However, when my pump died yesterday, I decided it just wasn't worth dealing with tank removal. That is not fun. The fuel lines can also be very delicate and easy to damage. Plenty of problems could arise from removing the tank, so I'll be cutting.

Having spent a fair bit of time working under vehicles, I feel that it's not worth it unless absolutely unavoidable. Why risk personal injury if you don't have to.

And the ice & water barrier sounds like an excellent sealing solution, but it could be hard to acquire a small piece, as it's sold in large, expensive rolls. I'm pondering a cover fashioned from a piece of aluminum sheet. Then secure it with short self drilling screws (with the tips then filed down). Waterproofed with a bead of silicone.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My concern is trying to get the car up safely, without damaging it or myself. Can't drive the car to the ramp. Don't have a lift. I've removed a few tanks over the years and can't believe I'm getting defeated by this. Re the cutting, my biggest concern is if somehow I was involved in a crash (or worse a family member) - if this hole I've cut was revealed would the insurer stand over the car? Is the car now 'modified'. These are the things going through my mind. I'm from an engineering family too and it just goes against everything I know to cut it.

On the flip side, if I do break the perished pipes into the tank, they're going to cost me €100 alone and prob weeks away due to Corona Virus. I don't like the location of the brake cables and pipes either. And Murphy's Law will no doubt throw in a few other surprises.
 

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The normal insurance question is 'has this car been modified'
So replacing a fuel pump - with a factory one isn't modification - its just repair.
If they don't ask - you don't have to tell. All you have done is some repairs...
If it passes your local roadworthy test etc - then its deemed roadworthy (at that point in time).
That's my view.
 

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Dropping the tank is hardly difficult. As long as the tank isn't full it's in & out in 90 minutes. It's worthwhile to have a selection of brushes (soft wire and otherwise) so you can brush away dirt & dust from connections. There simply aren't that many. I would always rather work on the outside of the car than the inside.

I have jacked the car up by the rear axle, placing one jack under each spring perch to keep weight in the right place, and then put jack stands at the jack points. Another approach is to pick up an ~8x12 at your favorite lumber yard and have it cut into multiple 1' segments. Then jack the car at the regular jack points and set the wheels back down on a stack of 8x1s. Either way.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dropping the tank is hardly difficult. As long as the tank isn't full it's in & out in 90 minutes. It's worthwhile to have a selection of brushes (soft wire and otherwise) so you can brush away dirt & dust from connections. There simply aren't that many. I would always rather work on the outside of the car than the inside.

I have jacked the car up by the rear axle, placing one jack under each spring perch to keep weight in the right place, and then put jack stands at the jack points. Another approach is to pick up an ~8x12 at your favorite lumber yard and have it cut into multiple 1' segments. Then jack the car at the regular jack points and set the wheels back down on a stack of 8x1s. Either way.
Thanks, jvanabra, that's exactly the sort of reply I was looking for. I've seen that done with the wood but had totally forgotten about it! Many thanks!
 

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I'd drop the tank, but like the idea of having access for future repairs. In theory, you shouldn't need to replace it again for another 100,000 + miles, but I've had a few new-ish pumps that didn't last long (in other vehicles, not Saab).
 

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I definitely see that point of view, but as you note it's really not a concern on a Saab. The Walbro pump is the pump in the automotive industry and supremely reliable. I cut the access hole once due to uncertainty about the job, but having done it both ways now I fall back to the official "drop the tank" procedure. You're going to replace a fuel pump once, maybe twice in a Saab's lifetime. Making your life easier in 2035 seems... hopeful. :D
 

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You also have to remember Jvanabra you live in the land of no salt or rust, so the underneath 20 years later looks just as it did year 1, the OP's not so much. I hate salt.
 

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Eh, that's what power tools and penetrating oil and mapp gas are for. The only metal fasteners down there are the tank straps and a couple hose clamps. Everything else is plastic and rubber.
 

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There used to be horror stories on this board about the tank straps breaking or the fasteners on the straps breaking, when trying to drop the tank. I live in Seattle, where we also don't have rust on our cars, so dropping the tank on mine was easy, but I wouldn't want to risk breaking a strap if I didn't have a spare on hand. I just checked eSaabparts, and the straps are on backorder.
 

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I will say that many years ago I wrecked a strap on a c900... the nut was seized, it stripped the threads on the strap, and then things got janky. BUT, since then, I hose them down with a good penetrating oil in advance and wire wheel the threads before turning the nuts. Everything is exposed so it's pretty easy to clean and see what you're doing. Not like threads into something that you cannot see or manage. If push comes to shove, Goldwing Used SAAB Parts Specializing in used recycled Saab 9.3 used parts, Saab 900 used parts Saab 9.5, Saab 9000 used parts or Volvo Saab BMW Mini Cooper Auto Dismantlers | OEM & Used Auto Parts :)
 

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There used to be horror stories on this board about the tank straps breaking or the fasteners on the straps breaking, when trying to drop the tank. I live in Seattle, where we also don't have rust on our cars, so dropping the tank on mine was easy, but I wouldn't want to risk breaking a strap if I didn't have a spare on hand. I just checked eSaabparts, and the straps are on backorder.
Then again, my NG900 had one of the straps break while just driving around! :mad:

Its fuel pump had been replaced years ago by a garage, who I assume did the tank drop.

So in one way, having a strap break while you're dropping the tank is a plus: you replace it with a good one on the spot.
 

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What about an '02?
I have an '02 9-3 Viggen conv. and I cut the hole and did the repair. I have absolutely no mechanical training of any nature, but watched a couple of videos on the repair and did it pretty easily. Plus, I'm old and decrepit & if I can do it, anyone can.
 

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I have an '02 9-3 Viggen conv. and I cut the hole and did the repair. I have absolutely no mechanical training of any nature, but watched a couple of videos on the repair and did it pretty easily. Plus, I'm old and decrepit & if I can do it, anyone can.
:LOL:
 
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