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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Just checking I've not brought a pup!

The car was advertised as an Aero HOT. How can I tell if it is a standard Aero rather or an Aero Hot?

I have used the VIN identification tool and it came back with the following.

Manufacturer: Saab Automobile AB
Product line: SAAB 9-5
Body type: 5-door Wagon
Gear box: 4-Speed Automatic
Engine type: B235R High Output Turbo
Model year: 2001
Assembly plant: Trollhattan line B or Arlov, Sweden
Serial number: 003949
Control symbol: Passed
SRS: Driver's and passenger airbag, 9-5 Aero

Is it an Aero?
Is it an Aero HOT?
230bhp?
250bhp?

What the specifiaction differences between and Aero and Aero HOT?
 

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They are the one and same thing. HOT = high output turbo (Mitsubishi TD-04) as opposed to the less powerful LPT = light pressure turbo (Garrett GT17) equipped cars.
 

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im sure someone will correct me if im wrong but i believe the HOT just stands for High Output Turbo, which refers to the TD04 turbo that all aeros have. you have a 2001 and for that year Saab rated the HP at 230. In 2002 they upped the HP to 250 and (correct me if im wrong please) but all they did was change the snorkel i think, which you can buy from genuinesaab or stealership and you can easily do yourself
 

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pdenton said:
In 2002 they upped the HP to 250 and (correct me if im wrong please) but all they did was change the snorkel i think, which you can buy from genuinesaab or stealership and you can easily do yourself
Software changes as well.
 

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Hmm heading off topic but is that true about the snorkel being the only change :) from the older to newer Aero models?

Cheers
Michael
 

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Its not true - the 2002 Aero has the standard snorkel with an Output of 250HP. There are Software changes in the ECU and a more realistic Performance rating.
 

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If you check saab i think they can tell you, also parkers. There was the Aero then the HOT as they needed to compete with other manufactuers. So the ECU was most def changed and maybe some other small stuff as well to make it really quick!

I would not really worry about it as it should be quick enough for road use!
 

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djrpowell said:
If you check saab i think they can tell you, also parkers. There was the Aero then the HOT as they needed to compete with other manufactuers. So the ECU was most def changed and maybe some other small stuff as well to make it really quick!

I would not really worry about it as it should be quick enough for road use!
Aero model always had the HOT, which refers only to the turbo.
In some of the earlier car versions if say they used the smaller engine 2.0, but used the HOTurbo, it was called whatever HOT, or whatever lpt for low pressure turbo.
So an Aero has it all, 2.3 engine, and the HOTurbo, from an engine configuration point of view. Never heard of an Aero with a low pressure turbo, see what I mean.
Regards,
CSE_20

Apparently the big T also refers to HOT, the little t refers to the lpt. But the Aero won't have the T or t, it's understood it's a capital T:D
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well that at least is a relief!

I can now focus on convincing the dealership's warranty and service manager to persuade Saab to pay for the sludge, chain wear and DIC issues now!

I have printed out pages from these forums to help justify my case.

Could the throttle body be damaged by the PCV issue? I have a had an O2 sensor failure in the throttle body that requires a replacement and I am wondering if the PCV issue might have been a potential cause.

Hopefully they'll play ball.
 

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duracell said:
Well that at least is a relief!

I can now focus on convincing the dealership's warranty and service manager to persuade Saab to pay for the sludge, chain wear and DIC issues now!

I have printed out pages from these forums to help justify my case.

Could the throttle body be damaged by the PCV issue? I have a had an O2 sensor failure in the throttle body that requires a replacement and I am wondering if the PCV issue might have been a potential cause.

Hopefully they'll play ball.
Service records if you think you have sludge issues!
The O2 sensors are not in the throttle body, they are on the exhaust pipes before the cat. convertor and possibly after the cat. too if there is more than one, not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Doh! Not the 02 sensor.

The fault code was for the air flow meter. I was told that this would require the fitting of a replacement throttle body and a software upgrade.

I have had the software upgrade but they suggested that would only fix the problem in 20% of cases.

Throttle body was quoted at £499 plus VAT plus fitting. About £700 in total!
 

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I have a had an O2 sensor failure in the throttle body that requires a replacement.

That's what you wrote. The air mass sensor is something else, and why would a the air mass sensor give you a fault code for the throttle body???
 

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Throttle body, mass airflow and O2 sensor failures are not related to PCV or sludging whatsoever. They are all external to the engine and oil system.

Sludging issues would give you a seized turbo or engine. PCV would give you quicker sludging, or possibly smoke out the exhaust. My recommendations for this is drop the oil pan to check the screen for sludge, upgrade the PCV system to the latest version, and do fully synthetic oil changes every 5000 miles at most. With an Aero, the likelihood of sludging is very low, unless the previous owner was incredibly negligent on servicing the car (i.e. missing numerous oil changes). The sludge issue seems to be notorious in only the base model 9-5's with the smaller, less reliable turbo, that were only specced for semi-synthetic oil.

If your mass airflow sensor is replaced, I don't see any reason why you would have to replace the throttle body. They are both separate as well. Is the throttle body broken perhaps? This would have nothing to do with the mass airflow sensor. So you really need to check out WHAT exactly is broken. So far I have heard sludge, timing chain, maf, o2 sensors, throttle body, etc etc. I highly doubt all of that is wrong at one time... the car would literally not be drivable.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ok an a FULL explanation. Please bear in mind that I only purchased this car 6 days ago! I have owned classic 900 convertibles but this is my first modern GM Saab

I was driving the car happliy up the motorway extolling the virtues of the newly purchased car when the cruise control de-activated and the engine warning light and traction control light came on.

The car was still driving ok so I pressed on to our destination as it was only 15 miles away. Once I reached the town we had some low speed stop start driving the engine was idling very roughly.

At the hotel I thought that it might be an electrict issue so pulled out some fuses to see if anything was blown. Nothing was broken and the act of removing the fuses seemed to kill the engine warning light.

That night when the engine was cold and it was almost freezing outside the car started fine but after two miles the engine warning light and traction control warning lights came on again. This time the engine was very, very rough and was cutting out unless I applied a fair amount of throttle. To drive the car required left foot braking and simultaneous throttle (bear in mind it's an auto).

I was convinced that problem was something to do with the fuel air mixture. A call to the AA in morning confirmed this when we ran a diagnostic on the car. He reset the codes and suggested that I get to Saab dealer asap.

Although 180 miles from home I was luckily only 1 mile from Saab dealer.

I was camped outside service reception at 7.45am and begged the service manager to help get the car sorted out sufficiently to get home.

He then had the car all morning and diagnosed the following (digs out paperwork).

'Carried out DTC'c found code P1251 (1) and P1260 (0). Diagnosed as error with throttle body'

'Carried out SPS of T7, reset throttle position'

He suggested that this error code meant that (and you will have to forgive my ignorance or miscomprehension) that a oxgen or air flow sensor had failed and that this could only be fixed by replacing the whole throttle body.

He suggested that software fix would only be a lasting fix in 20% of cases and that the issue might re-emerge at anytime.

Whilst the car was with them diagnosed the sludge and chain wear issue and suggested that car needed a £3.5k rebuild that Saab might be able to assist with if I could demonstrate my service history. They told me to contact my local dealer as soon as possible.

I have found out about the DIC whilst I have been researching the PCV issue this week and my local dealer has confirmed that the car is due a replacement.

The car appears to drive fine from my lay persons perspective but I was warned that it is showing the symptoms associated with the PCV, sludging, chain wear problem. Goes to show that I cannot spot a decent 9-5 and should stick to old 900's!

I hope that explains things a bit better.
 
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