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Hi everyone, I know there have been many threads about common failures of the DIC. I just bought a 2006 9-5 Wagon with the V6 last week. The very next day I got a check engine light and the codes P1312 and P1334.

I called a Volvo mechanic and he advised me to change my spark plugs first before changing the DIC. I bought/installed these plugs from Amazon. When I removed the DIC, I noticed some oil in the well and a very fine crack in the DIC (photos below). Not sure if I pulled a noob move, but I just went ahead to replace the old spark plugs with the one from Amazon anyway.

My questions:
1) Did I buy and install the wrong spark plugs? Amazon said these are compatible but I’m reading online that I should only use some specific NGK spark plugs?
2) Is my DIC bad and should I get a new OEM replacement?

Thanks so much everyone!

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Those are the wrong plugs. The correct ones are NGK 6290, which are the NGK PFR6H10 spark plugs that the car needs. The cheapest place to get them is RockAuto, and you'll only need 4 because it's a 4 cylinder. If you need the DIC, then RockAuto also has the NGK DIC, which is genuine just with an added NGK stamp, at the cheapest price. To somewhat determine whether the DIC might be bad we'd need to know if the plugs pulled were NGK PFR6H10, the date code on the DIC, and the number of miles on the car. However, the best way to check if the DIC is fine or not is by having good plugs to rule out the plugs being the problem.
 

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Firstly thats not a V6 engine. Note the 4 spark plugs.

I would agree with the mechanics suggestion to change the plugs first, as thats a cheap way of eliminating one possible cause.

Plugs - its critical to use the ones specified in the back of the owners manual, page 265 I think, namely NGK PFR 6H-10, gapped to 0.0374" or 0.95mm.

The DIC cartridge and plugs were designed to work together as a system, and many owners have discovered to their cost that if you substitute non-original versions of either, the engine will run but not happily. The DIC uses the plugs as a knock detection sensor, so the resistance has to be precise. There will be loads of plugs out there that will (a) screw in and (b) make a spark of some kind, and for many sellers that makes them "compatible". Not so with these engines.

Cracks in the casing of the DIC are frequent. I've been running cracked ones in my two stage 1 re-mapped Saabs for years and they're fine. Its cracks in the electronics inside that might be a problem, but not external cracks.

If you do replace the DIC, it has to be a genuine SEM AB or NGK (who took over SEM in the US) unit. We never hear of anyone who uses a cheap copy with success.

I don't imagine that oil in the plug trough is anything to worry about. If it was wet and coming out of a seal it would be a concern but that looks dried.

It'll be a great car when you get it sorted out. The fault codes you mentioned are not unusual on here!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you @Jdt9608 and @Doug! I

My 2006 9-5 has about 114K miles. The oil in the corner left of the well was wet when I took out the DIC, which was what led me to believe that the DIC could be bad (and may be related to the P1312 and P1334 error code). @Jdt9608 is this the NGK DIC you were referring to?

I've ordered the correct NGK PFR6H10 spark plugs. I mis-typed and yes it's a 4-cyc...I just bought a XC90 (the V6 engine) and confused the two.

I have not driven the car since installing the wrong spark plugs, but I did turn on the engine last night and the idle was pretty bad. The vibrations were significantly more noticeable. Another sign that I installed the wrong plugs I guess....
 

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I don't know the Denso coding system. However the one thing that is clearly stated on every DIC is that you must use resistor plugs. I don't see an "R" in the Denso code, and most companies have the R for a resistor plug. So I would not run the engine at all, unless it turns out that the Denso plugs are indeed resistor plugs.
 

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The oil in there is due to your valve cover gasket leaking, which shouldn't affect the DIC. At least it didn't when mine went bad. And yeah that is the DIC I was referring to. If the current DIC is the original and has that many miles on it, then it'll likely need replacing. But like I said, the best way to figure out if the DIC is fine or not is by first ruling out the plugs
 

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FWIW, I bought my 2006 wagon with around 80,000 miles on it. It now has 145,000 miles. When I got it, it had a check engine light with codes P1312, P1334, and some others I can't remember. I went to change the plugs + DIC, and found the previous owner had some non-recommended plugs in there. I want to say they were Champions, but it has been a while. Anyway, the car was well cared for with a good service history, but obviously the previous owner (or his mechanic) didn't have any Saab specific knowledge. I fitted the proper NGK plugs and a new DIC, and it has been fine. In hindsight I may not have even needed a new DIC!

Not trying to contradict others here, but my car could have been running the wrong plugs for a LONG time, and it has so far survived for another 60,000+ miles. But as others have said, get the proper plugs in and then move on to the DIC.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you everyone! I replaced it with the correct plugs and it feels smoother and less vibration on the idle. I did a 2/3 turn to tighten the spark plugs and hope I didn’t make a mistake there?

Should I go ahead and replace the valve gasket cover as well since there’s a oil leak in the trough?
 

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Thank you everyone! I replaced it with the correct plugs and it feels smoother and less vibration on the idle. I did a 2/3 turn to tighten the spark plugs and hope I didn’t make a mistake there?

Should I go ahead and replace the valve gasket cover as well since there’s a oil leak in the trough?
Did your check engine lights clear up with the new spark plugs?

I'd go ahead and do the valve cover gasket. It's not a hard job. It's not super urgent...the little bit of oil seepage probably isn't hurting anything, but oil leaks bug me so if it were me, I'd take care of it.
 

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Yes, the check engine light went off. It actually went off after I installed the wrong plugs that I bought off Amazon. Crazy strong idle. Not with the NGK. It would be interesting to see if the new plugs would make any difference in gas mileage. I’ve only owned the car for 1.5 weeks thought and it averaged 19 mpg on the freeway, which seems a little low.
 

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Put another week of miles on the new plugs. The ECM has to adjust to the new and correct plugs.You should be able to achieve 28 to 32 MPG on the freeway.
 

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If you wanted to reset it right away, there's a fuse you can pull for the ECU. I think its #17 but double check.
 
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