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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Let the car idle for about 20 minutes in the driveway this evening, just to see what would happen.... So far, cooling system looks great... nothing weird going on in the reservoir, still holding pressure in the system, engine staying cool and fans cycling as normal.

Of course, it can't be that easy. While looking around I noticed raw fuel pooling near the left shock tower. Dope.

This is where I direct more anger at the shop that kicked off this purchase with their misdiagnosis of the crank sensor. I will guaran-damn-tee during their troubleshooting they checked for fuel pressure at the rail, and after they were done with that they reinstalled the fuel feed line wrong. There is a somewhat specific angle that line needs to follow - if it's too horizontal it stresses the line on the banjo fitting, and if it's too vertical the line rubs against the idle control valve and breaks the line. The union is prone to the latter - as you tighten the banjo on the rail, it rotates downwards into a "too vertical" position. To paraphrase the Captain, so you get what we saw here today... A broken line.

I should have spotted this when I first looked at the car, as I've seen this issue multiple times. I didn't... though I'm glad this happened while the car wasn't going anywhere. It would suck to blow a head gasket and burn to the ground. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I'm not super proud of this, but it could be worse:



I used one of these on the '85 SPG to join two halves of a return line. There's no real pressure in the return line, and it's been 100% leak free for several years now. This feels quite a bit more iffy.... but it is what this coupler was designed to do, and it isn't leaking.... Probably ok?

The position of the coupler shows where the cut in the line was, and it's pretty easy to see how the line being installed at the wrong angle would result in contact with the idle valve. It's very disappointing when a professional a) doesn't just put things back the right way, and b) even when they don't inherently know the right way, doesn't take a step back to see that the way they did it is clearly gonna be a problem down the road.

It made it the 10 miles to the office today without any major incident. Just a new CEL. Because of course. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #23
CEL is still intermittent - a minute or two when the car is cold. I haven't pulled the code, 'cause whatever. Car is driving great, cool beans.

The ABS light has been on since I got the car, no real surprise. I'm guessing it's the early stages of accumulator failure, but it doesn't seem to have the constant pump cycling, so maybe it's something else. I decided to make a "real" ABS code tool:



It's a simple on/off switch with a connector at the end to plug into the ABS "diagnostic socket."

The green housing is Saab #12795968 which are used on most '90-'02 cars in some way or another. An easy source is under OG9-3 power seats. One could splice wires onto pigtails but I have a decent supply of AMP terminals, including TE/AMP #962841 (tab terminal, 17-20awg).

I made the wire about 3' long so it can reach from the engine compartment (1990) or the back seat (1991+) to the driver's seat without having to do weird contortions.

I'll put it in a box eventually, right now I'm just kinda interested on pulling the ABS codes. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
The process for pulling the ABS codes is somewhat annoying - it's a very primitive system. The approach:

1. Connect "test connector" (the two wires with a switch)
2. Leave the ignition key in the OFF position
3. Set the test connector switch ON
4. Turn the ignition key to the RUN position
5. Wait a moment, then set the test connector switch OFF

The ABS light will illuminate for about 2.5 seconds, then turn off for about 2.5 seconds.

The first code will be displayed - the light will flash quickly, pause for 2.5 seconds and repeat this four times. You must count the number of times the light flashes between each pause. The number of flashes equals one digit of a four digit fault code. At the end of the four digit fault code, the light will remain illuminated.

If the fault code is for a wheel sensor, it will immediately start repeating the same code. The four wheel sensor codes are:

1233 - left front wheel sensor
1241 - right front wheel sensor
1243 - right rear wheel sensor
1311 - left rear wheel sensor

To move onto the next code, turn the test connector switch ON for 2.5 seconds, then turn it back off. You'll get another series of flashes/pauses/light stays on. Move on to the next code by turning the test connector switch ON for 2.5 seconds then OFF again. Repeat until you get Code 0000 (below).

If the fault code is for a system problem, it will only show you one code. The possible system problem codes are

1111 - Internal fault in the ECU
1112 - Left front inlet valve (IFL)
1114 - Right front inlet valve (IFR)
1122 - Rear Inlet valve (IR)
1132 - Left front outlet valve (OFL)
1134 - Right front outlet valve (OFL)
1142 - Rear outlet valve (OR)
1222 - Main Valve ¦
1312 - Current leakage from battery (+12V) to the circuits for pressure transmitter and brake fluid level transmitter

(Remember this is a 3-channel system - front left, front right, and rear)

Code 0000: When all codes have been displayed (X wheel sensor codes and/or 1 system code) there will be a series of four 2.5 second flashes indicating Code 0000, finished.

Complete the process by turning the test connector switch ON for 2.5 seconds then off again. There will be a series of short flashes.

At this point, you need to fix the issue. If the problem was a system fault, then repair may yield a second code, so be prepared for that.

Once the issue is fixed, being sure codes have been fully read (you got to the four 2.5 second flashes indicating Code 0000), drive the car over 20mph. The light should remain off. If it comes back on, you gotta do the whole thing again.

Here's the factory manual pages -

These used to be on Townsend's site, but there doesn't seem to be a way to navigate to them anymore.
 
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