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Assuming that 16" steel rims fit over the brakes, 16" Saab OEM rims with Saab wheel covers (to keep the hub nut from rusting), 205/60-16 tires. Pros: cheap, better chance of surviving potholes and curb oopsies than low profile rubber, narrower tire works better in heavy snow or deep slush. Cons: doesn't look sporty. Handling? Hey, they're winter tires.
 

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Agreed. I always used Semperit, when I lived up north. Those tires would climb like nothing else in the snow. They're a Continental brand now, so you might be able to get them in NA. If you're in EU, no problem.
 

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Steel???
What I have heard, Saab uses steel to make excellent car bodies.
I use Hirsch 6 spoke star rims with winter tires in both my winter Saabs.
 

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Bare black steel rims are the usual signs of someone with winter tires around here. Winter tires are not mandatory, but I would say that 30-40% of cars do use them. Big "SUV" drivers may not be able to afford winter tires especially if they have to have the luxury X5, Q7, etc. because their lease payments are high and those things have huge and expensive rims/tires.

The average black steel rim I see is made in China, but I got lucky and found a very good condition set of Saab 16x6.5 ET41 rims with wheel covers for cheap. Saab recommends relatively closed wheels without large openings for winter, to keep salt and slush off the brakes. There is a LOT of salt everywhere, pretty much through the whole winter.

Saab steel rims are no heavier than Saab OEM alloy rims of the same size, by my measurements, so it's not like "heavy steel rims" is an issue.
 

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Does an open wheel really encourage salty snow to stick around the brakes? Under what conditions would that happen?

(They mostly use sand around here, salt VERY rarely, so it's never been on my radar!)
 

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I've never found that infiltration on to the brakes is a problem except for rain. But, I never lived as far north as Ed.

In snow country the biggest issue I find with an open wheel design is that the snow and ice freeze in there and your wheels are unbalanced until it melts off. That can be days in the dead of winter. A completely closed wheel design would be best to prevent that. Something like the Saab Viking wheel is probably second best - minimal, large holes that are easy to clean out when cleaning the car off. Some closed hubcap steel wheels would do it.

But, I'm a slave to fashion. Fernando taught me that it's better to look good that to feel good, dahlings. I'd rather suffer the downside of a little temporary vibration to have a decent looking wheel on the car in the winter. Not to mention, Saab 16" alloy wheels are plentiful on the market in many areas. It's not hard to find a winter set.
 

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My limited experience is that less wheel prevents snow from building up .... these were champs even with Nokian summer tires on them. :)

 
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