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Discussion Starter #1
My wife's '01 9-3 in Steel Gray: there were some chips and scratches where people have opened their car doors in parking garages and hit her car.

I bought some SAAB touch-up paint in Steel Gray. I applied it conservatively (using short strokes over the scratches, like applying Liquid Paper, trying to thin it out as much as I could).

But when done, the new paint looks BLACK. It REALLY stands-out.

I read on another forum (after the fact) that I should have shaken the touch-up paint really well (which I hadn't done). NOWHERE on the packaging does it say to shake well. I did shake well just now and see that after shaking the color of the touch-up paint does indeed turn the proper shade of gray.

But it's too late for the car. Is there ANY WAY to get the touch up paint OFF the car? If I take it to a professional paint and body specialist, can they save me or am I beyond hope?

I can't find a "detailing" forum here and couldn't figure out if this is the proper forum to post this in, so if it's not I apologize.

Please advise. TIA.
 

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If you applied it recently, usually rubbing alcohol will take it right out. If it has bonded, you can try using a rubbing compound to get rid of the paint. Make sure you only use a little rubbing compound if it gets to that point though, as you can scratch the surface of your good paint that way.
 

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Google detailing, these forums abound

Then apply the clearcoat after the new application
Even if the touch up is imperfect, it does show that the owner cares - important at resale time and during ownership...

All paints must be shaken and continuously mixed, all liquids with solids(most of them) need a good shake...
 

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One thing I have read on here about applying the touch up paint is to mix it with a little water and use the end of a match to apply. I think it goes something like this: Find a suitable small container, shake the paint well and put the necessary amount of paint in, and add a few drops of water and mix the two together, now you have something that is more workable. Now, pull a match out of a book of matches and use the end that does have the match head on it as a small brush to apply it. Works a charm. Keep in mind too that the Saab touch-up paint contains some body filler, so when its all dry it will have expanded a bit, so don't bring the fresh paint all the way up to level with the rest of the body paint, if you need to put more, do that once the first batch has dried and settled

One question I have, with some chips that I neglected this winter (who wants to be out in the driveway in 10F weather?), some rust has formed within the chips, reminds me of the nucleus of a single cell organism. How do I get to that little spot of rust within? I guess I should do the google search too. What I'd like to have is something like a pencil, but instead of graphite/lead in the pencil, some sort of abrasive/sand paper core to it for those small, recessed rust spots that taking a sheet of sand paper would do more damage than good. Does such a product exist or am I possible looking at a million dollar invention that I should quickly patent right now?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I took it to a pro

I took the car to a pro after screwing it up so badly myself. Finally I have a good idea!

They used a can of some sort of chemical (smelled like acetone but I'm told it wasn't) and poured it on a rag. This took my "fix" paint right off while leaving the underlying paint intact.

Then he took some rubbing compound (the stuff they use when you get your car professionally waxed and deatailed) and fixed the scuffs on the doors. There are two small paint chips in the doors but I'm going to tackle them with a toothpick and WELL MIXED touch-up paint.

I've learned my lesson! I learned a few things: first, if you don't know what you're doing take it to a professional. Second, shake up the paint well before applying. Third, little scuffs in the paint that don't go all the way through don't need to be painted. They can be buffed-out.

Thanks to all who responded to this thread. The car looks 100% better now.
 

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I use acetone all the time for paint chip repairs. It takes off the touchup paint but leaves the original paint in tact. For small chips it is very difficult to keep the paint off of the surrounding area, even with a very fine tipped brush. After the paint has a day to dry, wrap a small cotton cloth around the end of a popsicle stick and then pour a little acetone on it. The flat surface of the stick removes the highest build up of paint without removing it from the chip. (In your case, this might be good.) I use this technique to build up paint in the chip cavity until it is about flush with the surface. Then, some very fine sandpaper and clear coat will finish the job and blend it in.
 

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Slaab4life said:
One thing I have read on here about applying the touch up paint is to mix it with a little water and use the end of a match to apply. I think it goes something like this: Find a suitable small container, shake the paint well and put the necessary amount of paint in, and add a few drops of water and mix the two together, now you have something that is more workable. Now, pull a match out of a book of matches and use the end that does have the match head on it as a small brush to apply it. Works a charm. Keep in mind too that the Saab touch-up paint contains some body filler, so when its all dry it will have expanded a bit, so don't bring the fresh paint all the way up to level with the rest of the body paint, if you need to put more, do that once the first batch has dried and settled

One question I have, with some chips that I neglected this winter (who wants to be out in the driveway in 10F weather?), some rust has formed within the chips, reminds me of the nucleus of a single cell organism. How do I get to that little spot of rust within? I guess I should do the Google search too. What I'd like to have is something like a pencil, but instead of graphite/lead in the pencil, some sort of abrasive/sand paper core to it for those small, recessed rust spots that taking a sheet of sand paper would do more damage than good. Does such a product exist or am I possible looking at a million dollar invention that I should quickly patent right now?
This is some good stuff, Saab for life..
The paper matches work very well for applying touch up, yet still can be saved and used.

"There is a chip on your eye ,hold still, while I get a match !"
A bit unsettling at first, but this was so effective (back in the 60s) , the good old days..

As far as the rust eraser goes, PepBoys sells then in their "paint department". Invented years ago, I guess...
I have one, these work well.
Also, a typo eraser may work..
 
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