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Discussion Starter #1
I was working on my car last weekend, and i forgot to turn off the interior lights when i was working on the stereo, sure enough i killed the battery. Car clicked when i turned the key. Luckily my neighbor was close, and gave me a quick jump.

Now on any other car, i would run it no problem. I have done it before, I'm sure almost everyone has jumped their car with zero issues from it, and the battery worked for another year or more. But this is a saab :roll: I hear nothing but battery woes about these cars.

Come christmas i am driving home to CT (800mi) and i don't want my car to die on me. Should I get a battery and throw it in the trunk in case, I should i not worry about it?

BTW it has started fine since then, 3-4 starts.

Thanks!
 

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The thing that kills the batteries is letting them sit with a low charge state; this allows sulphur to come out of the acid solution and coat the lead plates. it takes a while for this reaction to occur though. If it was only discharged for a few hours you should be fine.
That said, If I was still driving my 2003; I'd have a new battery in it now for the winter, if it needed it or not. I wouldn't trust it more that 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks, people say that about batteries (replace 3 yrs). I have never replaced a battery in my 10 years of driving though. And I certainly have owned cars for more than 3 years. I think every car i have owned was on its original or second battery, never had an issue.
 

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robhurlburt said:
thanks, people say that about batteries (replace 3 yrs). I have never replaced a battery in my 10 years of driving though. And I certainly have owned cars for more than 3 years. I think every car i have owned was on its original or second battery, never had an issue.
The issue is OEM Saab batteries seem to peter out in 2 1/2 - 3 years. Pretty much any quality aftermarket battery will go alot further, many have 60 or more month warranties (pro rated replacement)

Give yours a charge and see how it does, if when it starts getting cooler it's still cranking well you should be fine, if it starts to slow a bit your due.
 

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My last Saab (97 900SE) stranded me without warning one day when the battery failed. It had started fine earlier that day. This time I took no chances and replaced my '03 battery a few weeks ago. It was easy.

I'll agree that a single full discharge cycle is not likely to be a problem, but I would replace any 4-year-old battery as a matter of course if I lived in a cold climate (which I do.)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
JonV said:
Give yours a charge and see how it does
Where can I get it charged? How much does it cost? Is it cheaper to buy a new one? Doesn't the alt recharge it?

sbl said:
My last Saab (97 900SE) stranded me without warning one day when the battery failed. It had started fine earlier that day. This time I took no chances and replaced my '03 battery a few weeks ago. It was easy.
Thats what i am worried about. Why do saabs do that? My friends have had bad batteries and we would pop the clutch to get it running. thought cars got their electrical power off the alt

How do i know if its original?
 

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robhurlburt said:
Doesn't the alt recharge it?
The alternator will recharge the battery.

The stock batteries that come with our cars do not hold up well. If it is older than 3 years replace it. You cannot go by "whether or not it cranks." A battery can be at 25% charge and still start the car.

The problem with an older battery is its reserve and cold cranking amps get diminished as the plates deteriorate. I checked my OEM battery at 4 years. At full charge it was giving a maximum voltage which corresponded with 75% charge on a new, good battery. That basically means it was no longer capable of taking a full charge.

Modern cars like Saabs with all kinds of computers on board can be very sensitive to electrical problems. So replace the battery at 3 years. As JonV said, almost any aftermarket battery will last about 5 years. You have to search for one as junky as the stock Saab battery.
 

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Ctrlz said "You have to search for one as junky as the stock Saab battery."


LMAO, ...The Chinese won't even bootleg it.
 

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Your car is approaching or is 5 years old. As said here, it's not a bad idea (and cheap insurance) to replace your battery. I however went over 4 years and 106,000 miles without any battery problems on my 03'.

Carrying a battery around in the trunk doesn't make much sense. If you're that concerned and don't get a new battery, buy a small battery charger and carry that--a little better and safer. I do that with my 71' Olds as I have a tendancy to run the battery down with the stereo a little too often:x
 

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Cosmicflash said:
I however went over 4 years and 106,000 miles without any battery problems on my 03'.
So did I, Cos. But when I took a meter to my fully charged "good" battery, I got 12.4 V. That translates to 75% charged. An actual good battery should read 12.6 V.
 

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robhurlburt said:
Why do saabs do that? My friends have had bad batteries and we would pop the clutch to get it running. thought cars got their electrical power off the alt

How do i know if its original?
The battery performs a "filtering" function for the alternator. It literally acts like an electrical flywheel, supplying power when the alternator can't respond quickly enough to increased load.

True story: The battery died on my old car. Wasn't completely dead, but not enough to turn the engine over. I push-started it and it started up but the first thing I noticed is that at idle the engine seemed to run poorly as though it were going to stall, so I decided to take it for a drive on the highway to charge the battery. It started to rain so I turned on the headlights. The engine felt like it misfired when I did that..that was my second clue that the battery wasn't taking a charge anymore. I headed straight to Montgomery Wards (remember them?) to get a new battery. (They didn't have the right battery for the Ford Contour, it specified a battery that until recently was usually not stocked anywhere but the dealer--now Ford uses that same battery in the Escape, Fusion, Mustang.. but they were able to make another reverse-terminal battery fit)

As far as how you can tell it's the original battery, it has two carrying handles and just has the GM logo on it, no other logos.
 

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Just a curious aside, I have never actually been to an Autozone or Advance,,the places always mentioned here to get a code read or a battery checked. Am I alone in having a local service station that does these things? Like where I go to have a tire leak fixed for 10 bucks or when I need a tail-light bulb they actually put it in at cost, no labor charge?
 

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ctrlz said:
So did I, Cos. But when I took a meter to my fully charged "good" battery, I got 12.4 V. That translates to 75% charged. An actual good battery should read 12.6 V.
75% is the minimum. anything lower its time for a new battery.
 

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JonV said:
Just a curious aside, I have never actually been to an Autozone or Advance,,the places always mentioned here to get a code read or a battery checked. Am I alone in having a local service station that does these things? Like where I go to have a tire leak fixed for 10 bucks or when I need a tail-light bulb they actually put it in at cost, no labor charge?
I too have a local service station that does that sort of stuff.

However, when I'm 750 miles from home and the check engine light comes on, where am I going to get the code read? Autozone. If it's 7pm on a Saturday night and I need a replacement bulb, where am I going to get it? Autozone, Advance, or maybe even Wal-Mart. If I need a quart of oil, or brake fluid, or coolant, I'll get it there too.
 

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Some points on batterys, some have been brought up in the reply's

Don't ever leave a battery in your trunk or in a cold garage. Batterys that don't have a charge can freeze in cold weather. Once they freeze, the cells that did, are no good. Learned this from experience. This also applies to a dead battery you have hooked up under the hood.

Most batterys make mention on there 'cold cranking amp' ratings. The colder it is, the more work for the battery to start your car and be re-charged. But crazy as it may be, my battery died during one of this past summers heat waves.

If your battery loses charge while working on the car, I'd be curious how long it took to drain it. If it drains very quickly then I'd start looking at buying a new battery. If it took all day with the headlights on, that's not a big deal.
 

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brianl703 said:
I too have a local service station that does that sort of stuff.

However, when I'm 750 miles from home and the check engine light comes on, where am I going to get the code read? Autozone. If it's 7pm on a Saturday night and I need a replacement bulb, where am I going to get it? Autozone, Advance, or maybe even Wal-Mart. If I need a quart of oil, or brake fluid, or coolant, I'll get it there too.
LOL, if I'm 750 miles from home I'm usually on Interstate or near one, closer to a 24/7 Truckstop with actual mechanics than any Auto Parts chain. They got all that stuff too. Even Grits;)
 

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I used to drive A LOT in a former life. Here's what I hold to be true about batteries. That being said, I'm not a chemical engineer.

If you drive short trips to the office daily without driving 30 minutes or more at least a few times a week, this is hard on your battery as it really doesn't charge well. In this scenario, your battery won't last more than a few years. I used to drive 50,000 per year and I don't think I ever replaced the battery in my car in that time. 1989 Volvo 740 Turbo stock battery. My wife drives 3 minutes to the office daily and drives more than 30 miles once every other week. We replace her battery, out of necessity, about once every 3 years. Yes we get a prorated warranty reimbursement.

If your battery goes dead, it isn't a big deal if you're driving the car decent distances on a regular basis. Both kids in college, cars sit for extended periods, extremely hard on batteries. Have had to replace both battereis.

Good info above if battery had gone dead and in freezing conditions. Daughters in college + winter=ruined battery.

This is what I know about batteries. Well, have an awesome day!!:)
 
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