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okay, so i realize strobing is going to happen in our cars, as LEDs draw different currents than halogens.

i've noticed that superbrightleds.com carries these:

RL-650 Tail Light Load Resistor kit
6 Ohm, 50 Watt load resistor kit
Solves most LED turn signal problems
Connect one across each LED turn signal bulb to simulate filament Tail/Turn signal bulbs
$ 4.95



link: http://www.superbrightleds.com/cgi-bin/store/commerce.cgi?product=CAR (near the bottom)

i have red LEDs in my tail lights, and very bright white LEDs in my reverse lights. now, i can go without the tail lights if necessary, but the reverse light is key because the extra light lets me park infront of my home MUCH easier then any other bulbs i've ever used.

my question: how do i use these resistors? i don't see how i would put this on the bulb or in the casing somehow to stop the strobing. the strobing is only an issue because i look like an unmarked cop or EMT car when i drive because my reverse lights flicker every few seconds. it looks neat, but i don't want to get a ticket because of it!
 

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No need to strip the wire with those line taps that look like they are included (the blue things in the picture above).

If you notice there is a channel (groove) that is open from one end to the other. There is another channel (groove) that has a "stop" in the middle or there-about.

You place the supply (+) wire going to the light in the open channel (groove) then place one of the leads on the resistor in the other closed channel (groove). Fold the "flap" over and use a pair of pliers to drive the metal jumper spade into the two wires. It will penetrate the insulation on both wires.

Do the same thing to other side of the resistor on the ground (-) side and wha-la. You're done. Unless you do this where the connection is exposed to the elements, then you need to wrap the connection in electrical tape or something similar.
 

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yes, that is right. The line tap is applied directly to the wire. I'll see if I have a picture somewhere that shows how it work. Pretty nifty actually.



Picture copied from www.blinksafe.com

You can see one wire runs all the way through the tap and another enters but doesn't exit. The pliers are pushing the metal jumper spade into place. That spade has a "u" shaped cut centered over each wire. As it is pressed into place the "u" shaped section actually cuts into and through the insulation and makes contact with the wire inside. The "flap" is then folded over and locks into place to cover the metal spade.

Hope this helps.
 
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