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Discussion Starter #1
My 2001 Aero died in the center lane of the freeway during rush hour today. :eek: That was one of the most unpleasant experiences of my life! It cranks, but it won't, or will just barely start, and then instantly dies. After I got it towed home, I stuck my ear up to the fuel pump and turned the ignition to on. I couldn't hear anything from the pump. I jumped fuse 9 (radio) and the fuel pump fuse, and still nothing. Before I buy a new pump, I just want to make sure I was jumping the pump correctly. It looks like voltage comes into the upper contact of each fuse, so I jumped the upper contact for the radio fuse to the lower contact of the fuel pump fuse. Does that sound right? If so, then it sure seems like my fuel pump is toast. The car currently has 150,000 miles on it, which is a little more than my '97 900 and '00 9-5 had when their pumps died.
 

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Only other thing I can think of would be the CPS, but if you can't hear the pump prime when you turn the key on it's pretty damning.
 

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There is a test port on the fuel rail, it has a black cap on it, that allows you to connect a fuel pressure gauge.

First I'd let the pressure out by pushing on the valve with the car off. Then turn the car on and see if it pressurizes again by letting the pressure out again.
 

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To power it, you could use jumper cables from the battery to the back sear and then alligator clip wires from end of jumper cable to pump contacts
 

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Other way to power it is to use the same technique (jumper cable and aliagtor clip jumper) and apply the power to the fuel pump fuse at the left side of the dash. This requires a shorter cable and avoids having to mess with applying power to the fancy connector at the pump. If you do not hear the pump run or see pressure build at the rail (assuming that you are measuring that as well), then the pump is definitely bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Jumping power at the fuse box is what I tried. I checked out my wife's 2000 9-5, and you can very clearly hear the fuel pump whirring when you turn the key to the accessory position. The one in the car that died is dead silent. I'm about 99% positive at this point that the fuel pump is dead. I may try whacking the fuel tank where the pump sits and see if that brings it back to life for a little bit. That would prove it for sure.

What do most of you guys do for a replacement? Replace the entire fuel pump assembly or just the pump itself? I saw that the genuine Saab one is down to less than $250 at eSaabparts, and the identical TI Automotive (formerly Walbro) one is around $220 from eEuroparts.
 

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These days I don't necessarily go for the cheapest fix. I have replaced "just" the electric pump once on a 9-5 (I did it on a 9000 earlier). But if you do it right, you need to address the fully submerged fuel line inside the pump assembly - and I was not comfortable with anything except the pricey fluoropolymer hose, so it added cost. And fiddling around with the assembly took more time than the pump swap itself. So the last pre-"Dame Edna" pump I installed, I just bought the OE assembly and put it in. That was a 2005 Arc, totalled by someone who made an illegal turn into it.

I know it's not your situation, but for anyone doing the job on a 2006-09 car I would for sure go with the OE assembly. It's a lot more work to drop the tank, the fuel level senders on the outside of the pump wear out, AND the filter is built into the assembly. I tore an assembly apart to see what rebuilding would look like, and it looked like replacing the filter would be devilishly difficult, if not impossible.
 

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Jumping power at the fuse box is what I tried. I checked out my wife's 2000 9-5, and you can very clearly hear the fuel pump whirring when you turn the key to the accessory position. The one in the car that died is dead silent. I'm about 99% positive at this point that the fuel pump is dead. I may try whacking the fuel tank where the pump sits and see if that brings it back to life for a little bit. That would prove it for sure.

What do most of you guys do for a replacement? Replace the entire fuel pump assembly or just the pump itself? I saw that the genuine Saab one is down to less than $250 at eSaabparts, and the identical TI Automotive (formerly Walbro) one is around $220 from eEuroparts.
my indy wacks it with a rubber mallet. the sloshing rotates the pump a bit and the motor gets away from the bad segment in the winding..

You still need to replace the pump, but if this works you know you have a segment of the armature that is not contacting, and the pump is bad
 

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What do most of you guys do for a replacement? Replace the entire fuel pump assembly or just the pump itself? I saw that the genuine Saab one is down to less than $250 at eSaabparts, and the identical TI Automotive (formerly Walbro) one is around $220 from eEuroparts.

Get a replaement walbro pump, you can drop it in the asembly pretty easiliy. YO can just cut the plastic hose off and use in-tank rubber fuel line. When you cut it it's best to cut the nipple off the old pump so you can put a clamp on teh runner hose real tight over the plastic hose.


These days I don't necessarily go for the cheapest fix. I have replaced "just" the electric pump once on a 9-5 (I did it on a 9000 earlier). But if you do it right, you need to address the fully submerged fuel line inside the pump assembly - and I was not comfortable with anything except the pricey fluoropolymer hose, so it added cost. And fiddling around with the assembly took more time than the pump swap itself. So the last pre-"Dame Edna" pump I installed, I just bought the OE assembly and put it in. That was a 2005 Arc, totalled by someone who made an illegal turn into it.

I know it's not your situation, but for anyone doing the job on a 2006-09 car I would for sure go with the OE assembly. It's a lot more work to drop the tank, the fuel level senders on the outside of the pump wear out, AND the filter is built into the assembly. I tore an assembly apart to see what rebuilding would look like, and it looked like replacing the filter would be devilishly difficult, if not impossible.

It doesn;t take any effort to pull the pump out of the housing, pulling from the tank takes more time. I have done the pump only swaps on 3 cars, never had an issue only on the first one where the rubber fuel line blew off ( it was a 233 pump high pressure) but I tried to place it on the plastic line wihtout the nipple hence the nipple recommendation


I on the contrary do everything for cheapness at this point, it bothers me every time I do something to the car that costs 1/3 of he value
 
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