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The best way to repair it is to replace it. After all, certain parts of the car cannot be repaired, like the fuel pump, shocks/struts, water pump, wheel bearings - they must be replaced with known working units... Ron
 

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I'm not sure that was it, but it is still useful.
Actually your labeled pic was even more useful. Not sure why I didn't realize this when I have it apart a few minutes ago, but:

The transformer either works or it doesn't and same with the relay.
The coils, if they are just "coils" of wire would also be the same.
So the only component (kind of) that could slowly fail (but still throw a code) in the DIC is the capacitor.

Actually the replay could be getting oxidized, now that I think about it.

The best way to repair it is to replace it. After all, certain parts of the car cannot be repaired, like the fuel pump, shocks/struts, water pump, wheel bearings - they must be replaced with known working units... Ron
Those are mechanical failures (although fuel pump has electrical components).
This is electrical.
Whenever I fix something electrical on my car my friend (and mechanic) looks at me like I'm doing magic.
Mechanics usually have a very poor understanding of electromagnetism, to say the least. I'm also poor, but compared to a most mechanics I'm Tesla.

I learned this on a BMW forum when a few mechanics told me that I needed an ignition switch and I tried to explain to them why this couldn't be the case. They didn't get it. Turned out to be a relay (which I suspected), but couldn't find for days, until some one on a forum told me where it was hidden.
The part cost $160 at BMW dealer and $85 on ebay (I paid $1500 for the car, so ~6-11% the value of the car). I changed the capacitor in the relay for $.00 and kept on driving.

The guy who had it before (super drunk stone mason) kept changing the starter repeatedly (didn't tell me when I bought the car of course) because he couldn't figure out why the starter kept starting when the car was already on, if he even figured out that much.
True story, I hope some one enjoyed it ;ol;
 

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The coils are miniature induction coils taking the 12V input, which has been reformed within the DIC to 400 VDC, and stepping it up to 35,000 - 40,000 volts in the secondary windings like in a big old fashioned automotive coil.

The coils in a T5 DIC have different inductance and voltage than T7 and T5 uses a thyristor to trigger discharge while the T7 uses a triac.

A thyristor will conduct current in one direction whereas a triac passes current in both directions. The result is an AC spark in the T7 DIC, increasing the duration of the spark in the T7 DIC to about 3x longer than that of the T5 DIC.

Both the T5 and T7 DICs are electrically supplied with battery voltage from the main relay (B+) and grounded to an earth point. When the main relay is activated the battery voltage is reformed to 400 V DC which is stored in individual capacitors within the DIC. 400 V voltage is connected to one of the poles of the primary coil in the four spark coils. To the ignition cassette there are four triggering lines from the Trionic ECU, pin 9 (cyl. 1), pin 10 (cyl. 2), pin 11 (cyl. 3) and pin 12 (cyl. 4) connected to the thyristors within the T5 DIC anf the triacs in the T7 DIC (each of which is located between the storage capacitor and the ignition coil). When the ECU is grounding pin 9, the primary coil for the first cylinder is grounded (via the ignition cassettes B+ intake) and 400 V is transformed up to a maximum of 40 kV in the secondary coil.

T-7 DI cartridge triggering

The DI cartridge has a trigger input for firing the four individual sparkplugs. These are triggered by signals from the ECU on pin 9, 10, 11 and 12 which are generated in the power driver IC CA3236 on the Trionic PCB (topside, 16 pin DIL housing). Internally these four pins are connected as show in the
table and the image below.

DI cartridge pin ECU pin number CA3236 pin number Description
2 7 1 (OUT A) Trigger cylinder 1
3 8 3 (OUT B) Trigger cylinder 2
4 67 6 (OUT C) Trigger cylinder 3
5 68 8 (OUT D) Trigger cylinder 4
THE common failure point of earlier T7 DICs that were subject to RECALL was determined to be an isolated gate bipolar transistor:
2000 - 2002 SAAB 9-3 Recall - Campaign #05V399000
Vehicle: 2000 - 2002 SAAB 9-3
Manufacturer: SAAB CARS USA, INC.
Manufactured between: 6/1/1999 - 6/30/2002
Recalled on: 9/14/2005
Owners Notified on: 3/13/2006
Number of Vehicles Affected: 103,202
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: IGNITION: MODULE
CERTAIN PASSENGER VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH B205/B235 4-CYLINDER GASOLINE ENGINES AND B308 6-CYLINDER GASOLINE ENGINES MAY EXPERIENCE OVERHEATING AND BURNOUT OF THE ISOLATED GATED BIPOLAR TRANSISTOR (IGBT) WITHIN THE IGNITION DISCHARGE MODULE (IDM) DUE TO INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ELECTRICAL LOADS.
OVERHEATING OF THE IGBT OCCURS MOST OFTEN AT ENGINE START-UP, BUT IT MAY ALSO OCCUR WHILE THE ENGINE IS RUNNING. ENGINE STALLING MAY OCCUR, WHICH COULD RESULT IN A CRASH.
DEALERS WILL INSPECT TO SEE WHAT VERSION IDM IS IN THE VEHICLE AND REPLACE THE IDM IF IT IS A VERSION BUILT PRIOR TO THE INTRODUCTION OF QP3. AN INTERIM LETTER WILL BE MAILED TO OWNERS IN OCTOBER 2005, INFORMING THEM OF THE CONDITION. PARTS ARE NOW AVAILABLE AND OWNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED TO BRING THEIR VEHICLES IN TO THE DEALERS TO HAVE THE IDM REPLACED BY LETTER DATED MARCH 13, 2006. OWNERS MAY CONTACT SAAB AT 1-800-955-9007.
SAAB RECALL NO. 05087.CUSTOMERS MAY ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION'S VEHICLE SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), OR GO TO http://WWW.SAFERCAR.GOV.
 

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wow, incredible info!

As an electronics designer and technician, I can understand where OP is coming from. I have repaired many automotive electronic components that are considered dispose and replace.

Now if I could just master fixing body rust :cry: LOL
 

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Thanks Saabo.
Sounds like the other components are under the black epoxy or whatever.
I was also kind of thinking, wow that's a small amount of components for what it does and the number of pins on the DIC.
I guess I thought there was a lot of stuff crammed into the "coils" somehow lol
The main problem is removing the epoxy (?).

I love these Saab forums because the Saab guys get really technical.
It's ironic the GM took over Saab because you go on a GM forum and those guys are exactly the opposite of you Saab guys.
You ask them what kind of ATF you need and they say: "red".
 

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wow, incredible info!

As an electronics designer and technician, I can understand where OP is coming from. I have repaired many automotive electronic components that are considered dispose and replace.

Now if I could just master fixing body rust :cry: LOL
I hear you.
Just about anything is fixable except rust (unless you want to replace the whole car piece by piece).

I'm trying to do something with this DIC again.
But from watching "wheeler dealers" I think the epoxy has to be drilled or routed out.

Has any one ever fixed one of these DIC's?
Or is there any info on how to do it anywhere?
 

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Unfortunately, there are no schematics of the internals of many of the electronics like the ECU, DIC, TWICE just to name a few. I'm lucky that I found a schematic for my '97 NG900 - it came out of Russia, but is gone now.

I worked on the first generations of electronic telephone systems in the early 1970's. Back in those days we had a 6' 6-shelf Call Store array that stored a whopping 8-Kb of memory. We had circuit pack schematics of all the packs plus the 8-Kb module. In a year or so, it went to 32-Kb memory. Again with all the schematics. The last 3-TB drive I bought was $79.00

Unfortunately, today schematics are considered proprietary. In my last 20-some years I worked in the cellular industry. From AMPS to CDMA to TDMA in most cellular frequency bands. If we has a $30-k amplifier that failed a self-test, we had two choices: power it off, reseat it and if it still failed, it would be shipped back to the manufacturer to be tested. And, we got back a lot of No Trouble Found. So, those basically went into the trash. The manufacturer would only connect it to a test computer and run a 5-minute test on it. There was no warming it, etc. because they needed to test components quickly.

So yourself a favor and pick up a couple of used Saab DICs, not the Chineese knockoffs, for $50 and call it a day. Oh and keep the aluminum tops, remove the paint and polish them... Ron
 

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So yourself a favor and pick up a couple of used Saab DICs, not the Chineese knockoffs, for $50 and call it a day. Oh and keep the aluminum tops, remove the paint and polish them... Ron
Okay, thanks.
I was about to buy a Chinese one when this one failed.
I always ride with an extra DIC in the trunk, now.
Wonderful car :confused:

Maybe it's too late and I'm being too philisophical, but why does Saab suck so much ***?
I mean, I've never heard people agree 100% on anything except about the sucking of *** by Saab.
The best reason I have heard for owning a Saab, is that you can't ignore them like a Honda they need constant attention.
You know before I owned a Saab, I thought people who said a car was unreliable just didn't know how to maintain it properly.
How did GM manage to take the most reliable car and turn it into the most unreliable car in just a few years?
And then people say: "GM lost so much money with Saab".
Really?!
Seems like they made a ton of money ruining the name of an honorable car manufacture by making it with cheap garbage parts.

You know the first time I drove this car home I thought there was something wrong with it. No, it's just the way they made it. Only thing worse than this was my Saturn Ion and that was way more reliable and $12,000 when new.

Every time I look at this piece of crap, it makes me want to throw up. Reminds me of a time in my life when I was so desperate and had so little I had to settle for this hunk of crap.

Saab owners are pretty cool though, so no offense. I guess you kind of have to be to put up with the kind of crap this car puts you threw. Kind of like a guy who's married to a bossy fat ugly chick, is usually pretty chill.
 

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i thought the t7 DIC's were theoretically easy to replace, apart from the 1/2" thick resin pool everything is embedded in. If you tried to cut out and replace a component, you would take out the surrounding components too.

don't buy a chinese DIC, its one of the few components that will be cheaper to buy a genuine one rather than replace every year.
 

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Okay, thanks.
I was about to buy a Chinese one when this one failed.
I always ride with an extra DIC in the trunk, now.
Wonderful car :confused:

Maybe it's too late and I'm being too philisophical, but why does Saab suck so much ***?
I mean, I've never heard people agree 100% on anything except about the sucking of *** by Saab.
The best reason I have heard for owning a Saab, is that you can't ignore them like a Honda they need constant attention.
You know before I owned a Saab, I thought people who said a car was unreliable just didn't know how to maintain it properly.
How did GM manage to take the most reliable car and turn it into the most unreliable car in just a few years?
And then people say: "GM lost so much money with Saab".
Really?!
Seems like they made a ton of money ruining the name of an honorable car manufacture by making it with cheap garbage parts.

You know the first time I drove this car home I thought there was something wrong with it. No, it's just the way they made it. Only thing worse than this was my Saturn Ion and that was way more reliable and $12,000 when new.

Every time I look at this piece of crap, it makes me want to throw up. Reminds me of a time in my life when I was so desperate and had so little I had to settle for this hunk of crap.

Saab owners are pretty cool though, so no offense. I guess you kind of have to be to put up with the kind of crap this car puts you threw. Kind of like a guy who's married to a bossy fat ugly chick, is usually pretty chill.
Wow!! Take it easy there!!
 

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We should count ourselves luck it is so easy to replace.

I have an 07 BMW with an electric water pump - the pump ECU is integral to the pump and the pump is located between the engine and the suspension.

At around 100k miles some small part of the electronic control module fails requiring the replacement of the entire pump/controller combo, $500 in parts and 5 hours labor at your own rate, or an indy. The pump itself is perfectly functional but because the electronics are mounted on it (and epoxied in to protect against vibration presumably) it is not repairable and so the whole unit must come out.
 

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Easy on the anti-Saab rant there, buddy.

My car is very reliable, knock on wood. Is it as reliable as an average Japanese vehicle? No. But, I can tell you some good stories about my Japanese cars and the manufacturers directly ducking responsibility to avoid liability or cost. Saab never did that to me - they went the other way and covered things under "Customer Goodwill" multiple times when they didn't have to.

As for DIC's, look into the problems that any car with a DI system has. My only complaint about the Saab DIC is that our models do not have individually replaceable coils.

Other than that, it's a modern car. Things go bad in all of them. Especially when they are thirteen to twenty years old, with 100K+ miles, and often not properly serviced by multiple previous owners.

Lastly, they offer a driving experience you won't get from most Japanese cars. I know, I've owned many. There is a difference. Japanese cars win on some points, but lose badly on what makes driving enjoyable.

If you don't like your Saab, then sell it. See what you can buy for the same money. Enjoy.
 

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We should count ourselves luck it is so easy to replace.

I have an 07 BMW with an electric water pump - the pump ECU is integral to the pump and the pump is located between the engine and the suspension.

At around 100k miles some small part of the electronic control module fails requiring the replacement of the entire pump/controller combo, $500 in parts and 5 hours labor at your own rate, or an indy. The pump itself is perfectly functional but because the electronics are mounted on it (and epoxied in to protect against vibration presumably) it is not repairable and so the whole unit must come out.
definitely not looking forward to that, however the saab's water pump wasn't exactly easy had to do it 3 times because the damn o rings wouldn't seat

As for unreliable saabs, find me a reliable japanese car with similar cargo room that can make 260hp for about 3K.
 

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definitely not looking forward to that, however the saab's water pump wasn't exactly easy had to do it 3 times because the damn o rings wouldn't seat

As for unreliable saabs, find me a reliable japanese car with similar cargo room that can make 260hp for about 3K.
Read up on what audi & VW drivers have to do. Makes ours seem easy.
 

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I have two saabs and they do not suck at all! Previous owners who Maintained their cars so I could buy then in fantastic shape...sure you have to put money into them yearly for maintenance you would for any car 15 years old...I had Hondas enjoyed them but they were never as fast as the turbo or handle as well. Either your making car payments or spending on maintenance. I figure if it cost 1k to keep the car maintained a year I am good with that.
 

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I own a 95 9000 cs and its been great! I have replaced the water pump, fuel pump and d.i. ive owned it for two years and love the damn car, infact my neighbor had one and I fell in love with it instantly my first time sitting in it. I bought the car knowing about the d.i. issues and the owner threw in a spare if I paid the asking price of $1100. I had bought a parts 9000 for $300 and took parts off it along with a d.i. that was in great shape! Needless to say is you buy the car because you love it, not any other reason. If you cant handle the known issues the get rid of it and get a japanese car if you want.
 
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