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Discussion Starter #1
I have a set, just replaces the CBV and when I get home I would like to put them in.
Anyone have a tutorial maybe w photos?
 

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Not hard, it'll be obvious to you which hose goes where to the firewall, there is a slight "lean" to the hoses when you stick them where they go that will be obvious.


Disconnect and pull the hoses for the CBV, the radiator and the return line. Disconnect both hoses from the heater core on the firewall.

you need to leave the solenoid connected or you're going to get an error code. Plug the vacuum line that goes to it though.
 

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What do you need to figure out how to install them? They go i pretty much the same as the old comes out.

Mark in Maine posted this info online:
The picture DIY's don't seem to be out there, but check FixMySAAB for the by pass valve DIY. Search MacKay and SWEDECAR - Anders has multiple references on how to. I just did this on a 2006. Remove the battery (quick and easy) and then loosen three nuts to rotate the fuse box out of the way. Unplug and remove connectors for the ECU harness as you would to replace the BP valve, and "pull back" the ECU wiring harness to give access. Like Anders suggests, use a new sharp knife (X-Acto or similar) to cut the hoses right at the firewall. The shorter MacKay hose goes on the bottom - and pay attention to Anders' advice to use silicone on inside AND outside of hoses when you fit them to get the clamps to move over the hose and hose barbs.
 

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I have a set, just replaces the CBV and when I get home I would like to put them in.
Anyone have a tutorial maybe w photos?
I literally just did this on my '08. I just finished putting the whole car back together today, so probably won't be able to get you any decent photos. I did the conversion and replaced all my coolant hoses. I also did the serpentine belt and idler pulleys while I had everything torn up.

You'll spend a lot of time laying on top of the engine working, so I recommend putting something to pad your body from the engine (thick blanket, foam cushion, etc.). I broke the turbo BCV valve near the front of the car, and some other plastic clips from my fat belly pressing on them while laying on the engine. I also broke some plastic line that's part of the engine PCV system, so I got to replace all those parts as well.
Be careful!

-Drain the coolant at the radiator.
-Remove battery and battery box (as its in your way to work).
-Remove upper radiator hose (it's kind of in the way, but you may be able to work around it).

-you're basically just replacing 4 connections. Two on the motor block and two on the firewall that go inside to your heater.
So remove/cut that mess of hoses attached to the CBV and pull the whole mess out.
Remove the solenoid from the back of the CBV as this needs to stay in the car.

Hoses are pretty self explanatory. You'll see how they go on. One has a 90 degree bend and attaches to the motor block and they can only be mounted this way. Since the hoses are attached together, you can't mess it up.
The hard part is dealing with the hose clamps. I used a small wide mouth vice grip to spread the clamp, then put the hose on (use a tiny bit of dawn soap to lubricate it inside), positioned the clamp and released the vice grip and it snapped into place.
I personally recommend you reuse the original Saab type clamps, as I had used worm drive clamps two years ago when I replaced my CBV and have been having leaking issues ever since. I replaced my worm clamps with the oem Saab ones this time.

for the solenoid that used to be on the CBV, I reattached all the vac lines as they were, and just went to auto zone and got a vacuum line cap and put it on the solenoid nipple thing where the vac line used to attach to go to the CBV. I then zip tied the solenoid up on the firewall with the rest of the wiring (there's kind of an open spot in the middle of the car).

Have fun. This is not necessarily a hard job, but it sucks because there is not much room to work. Also note that most tools you drop behind the engine seem to get stuck in there somewhere instead of falling on the floor and it can be a massive pain the *** to retrieve them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Well that’s a lot of great information. Thank you so much.
We are on vacation. Drove thru Chicago from the UP to Marblehead, Ohio when the coolant started to drop.
Bought a cheap Dorman CBV from Amazon. Dealer wanted 120.00. But I only needed to get home.
I had my flexible hose clamp pliers and did the job in an hour, then did it again as
I didn’t think the hoses were in all the way.
Can’t imaging how to do it with regular pliers. Today over the BigMac bridge and 175 miles to the cabin.
Mike
 
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