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I'll start with what I did recently to the car. (02 Aero Auto)
-Installed correctly gapped Aero sparkplugs (were not in car prior to this)
-Oil changed with 0W-40 oil
-Goodridge SS Brakelines fitted
I did all of this over the course of a week while the car was on stands because of a part I needed.

To the main point:
I went for a test drive after i got everthing together, mainly for the brakes, but also for the plugs. I got a few good boost runs in thoroughly tested the brakes and everythings good. When I got back to the garage, I checked under the hood to check the brake fluid level, but what caught my eye was my turbo was HOT. Clearly visibly RED HOT!!:eek:

I usually don't look under the hood after I drive so I wanted to know if anyone knows if this is normal or not??

There was also a burning smell, but I think I did that. (accidently splashed brake fluid on the downpipe)

Thank you for your help in advance.
 

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I have a few questions why 0W-40; is it minus 0 degrees where you are? I just want to know why you’re using a thin engine oil? I've owned several SAABS and have never seen a red hot turbo. Yet here some say that's normal if you’re going to use a thin oil and it's not -0 degree or lower I can see how some can blow a head gasket because if that turbo in getting that hot do you think the engine is running any cooler.

I know Turbo get hot; red hot I'm having a hard time with that. What’s the point of having a turbo intercooler? I feel the thinner the oil the hotter the engine and turbo. If I'm wrong then I'm wrong I wouldn't think of putting a 0W oil in a turbo engine if it's not freezing cold out every day.

Just because it happened to a few cars don’t make it normal. When I drove my 900’s I always ran with 15W summer and winter in New England (MA); because I drove those cars hard. I was one of those drivers that had to let the turbo wind down before shutting the engine down. If you’ve ever owned a 1st gen 900T then you should know what I’m talking about because in those days your turbo would seize if you turned it off right of way after a hard drive. I’ve owned several SAABs; that don’t make me an expert but I do know what these cars can do and how to treat them.
 

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Its not a question of oil. Turbo gets red hot if you use higher boost, try it at night and you see it glowing...

Intercooler is located at the intake side. The exhaust side is getting red hot.

If the turbo is glowing, this doesnt mean the engine is glowing also. Its normal operating for a turbocharger to get red hot.

It looks like this http://www.forum-auto.de/technik/turbo_gluehend.jpg
and its completly normal.
 

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Its not a question of oil. Turbo gets red hot if you use higher boost, try it at night and you see it glowing...

Intercooler is located at the intake side. The exhaust side is getting red hot.

If the turbo is glowing, this doesnt mean the engine is glowing also. Its normal operating for a turbocharger to get red hot.

It looks like this http://www.forum-auto.de/technik/turbo_gluehend.jpg
and its completly normal.

Perfectly normal as has been stated already.

And there is not a thing wrong with using a quality 0W40 oil in a Saab.
We install 0W40 Mobil 1 Euro Blend all day long into Saabs ... never a problem and it is good for the chains and guides.
 

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From a Motorsport site....

The average temperature of the exhaust gas, at the entry point to a diesel turbo, is 800 degrees centigrade. A petrol engine can reach 1000 degrees, glowing bright yellow. Hot enough to melt window glass.
 

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How could you see the turbo? Are you running with the heat shield removed? Bad idea - you'll toast plastic parts (like the turbo bypass valve) pretty quickly that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for your responses SOOO MUCH! SC is SuperCool Awesomeness to be had by all. Woot!! :cheesy::cheesy::cheesy:

Completly normal.
Thank you

I have a few questions why 0W-40; is it minus 0 degrees where you are? I just want to know why you’re using a thin engine oil? I've owned several SAABS and have never seen a red hot turbo. Yet here some say that's normal if you’re going to use a thin oil and it's not -0 degree or lower I can see how some can blow a head gasket because if that turbo in getting that hot do you think the engine is running any cooler.

I know Turbo get hot; red hot I'm having a hard time with that. What’s the point of having a turbo intercooler? I feel the thinner the oil the hotter the engine and turbo. If I'm wrong then I'm wrong I wouldn't think of putting a 0W oil in a turbo engine if it's not freezing cold out every day.

Just because it happened to a few cars don’t make it normal. When I drove my 900’s I always ran with 15W summer and winter in New England (MA); because I drove those cars hard. I was one of those drivers that had to let the turbo wind down before shutting the engine down. If you’ve ever owned a 1st gen 900T then you should know what I’m talking about because in those days your turbo would seize if you turned it off right of way after a hard drive. I’ve owned several SAABs; that don’t make me an expert but I do know what these cars can do and how to treat them.
The reason I put 0W-40 in it is because I read a thread not to long ago that said it was fine, atleast that's what I got from it.

Its not a question of oil. Turbo gets red hot if you use higher boost, try it at night and you see it glowing...

Intercooler is located at the intake side. The exhaust side is getting red hot.

If the turbo is glowing, this doesnt mean the engine is glowing also. Its normal operating for a turbocharger to get red hot.

It looks like this http://www.forum-auto.de/technik/turbo_gluehend.jpg
and its completly normal.
Woah! it wasn't that red, fainter than that but still visible, and the test drive was at night.

Perfectly normal as has been stated already.

And there is not a thing wrong with using a quality 0W40 oil in a Saab.
We install 0W40 Mobil 1 Euro Blend all day long into Saabs ... never a problem and it is good for the chains and guides.
Thank you

How could you see the turbo? Are you running with the heat shield removed? Bad idea - you'll toast plastic parts (like the turbo bypass valve) pretty quickly that way.
If you look at the turbo in the dark and/or at an angle you can see it clearly, and I haven't taken off the heat shield.

And now to go Boosting:lol:
 

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After normal driving on the freeway for an extended period of time you will see this same thing, if you get under the hood quick enough.

0w-40 oil will get around the engine much quicker at engine start, when it gets up to temp it's still a 40 weight oil anyway. Plus these turbos are oil AND water cooled.

From what I understand, the heat shield also reduces expansion wear on the turbo by keeping the turbo from getting shock cooled by outside air. I don't know that I would run without the heat shield, personally.

One of my buddy's and my favorite things to do is to go on a spirited drive, then pull into a parking lot and let the engines idle for a bit and watch the turbos cool down. His car is an Audi A4.

One thing to say about the red turbo:
If you can, try to idle the engine (or drive around calmly) before shutting it down. If the turbo is too hot at shut-down, it can cook the oil pretty badly.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Also a sign of the driver just having had some fun! :cheesy::cheesy:
Oh Yeah!:cheesy:

After normal driving on the freeway for an extended period of time you will see this same thing, if you get under the hood quick enough.

0w-40 oil will get around the engine much quicker at engine start, when it gets up to temp it's still a 40 weight oil anyway. Plus these turbos are oil AND water cooled.

From what I understand, the heat shield also reduces expansion wear on the turbo by keeping the turbo from getting shock cooled by outside air. I don't know that I would run without the heat shield, personally.

One of my buddy's and my favorite things to do is to go on a spirited drive, then pull into a parking lot and let the engines idle for a bit and watch the turbos cool down. His car is an Audi A4.

One thing to say about the red turbo:
If you can, try to idle the engine (or drive around calmly) before shutting it down. If the turbo is too hot at shut-down, it can cook the oil pretty badly.
1. So was 0W-40 not the best thing to put in Aero?
2. I wish I had friends like yours.
 

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1. So was 0W-40 not the best thing to put in Aero?
2. I wish I had friends like yours.
No no, I was stating it was a good thing! You want the oil to get around the engine quicker at start-up! :cool:
 
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