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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have Goodyear Eagle Sport all-season tires on all four positions at the moment. The rear are fine (replaced last year), but the front are kind of worn and need to be replaced. I would prefer not to get the same tires again though, they don't feel comfortable to me and I'd like to go with the Vredestein Quatrac Pro instead, which are grand touring tires. Same sizes of course. Would probably provide better traction in the winter too... And I don't exactly push the car much so I'm not all that sure that ultra high perf. tires are a necessity...

Is it a problem to have different types of tires like this, grand touring at the rear and high performance at the front for example? I imagine the new ones would be installed at the rear and the rear ones rotated to the front. Would it create handling issues ,so I should just bite the bullet and get the Goodyear again at the front? Replacing all 4 is not an option since the rear ones have tons of tread left, it'd make no sense...

I mean when I think about it it doesn't necessarily make a whole lot of sense: people don't always change all 4 tires at the same time... so no matter what front and rear often don't have the same characteristics. I mean sure same pattern, but not the same level of 'worn' so not the same grip no matter what?

Thanks.
 

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Typically running mismatched tires won't cause an issue....typically ppl drive commuter cars well within the limits of their handling. IMHO if this were a true sports car it would be worth going into understeer/oversteer potential due to tires mismatched not only in grip but age/treadwear as well; however since it is not you should be perfectly fine. In the future I would recommend 2 things:
1. Don't replace worn tires without rotating them at that time
2. Rotate them more frequently (at least front to back is a quick job in the driveway) and you'll end up replacing all 4 tires around the same time to maintain equal handling throughout the life of each set of tires.

P.S. - If you plan on driving the car like a racecar, then ignore what was said above and match all 4 tires together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, it kind of makes sense to me. Definitely do not plan on driving the car hard, even if I wanted to the clutch is slipping anyway. :p Waiting to hear from the local Saab expert on part sourcing to fix it...
 

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You want the tires with the best traction on the rear. That will be tricky, because the new tires might have best traction in the wet, but not otherwise.

If you find yourself having to hit the brakes on a fast onramp, you don't want to discover snap oversteer. I would replace all the tires. And then rotate them so that they wear evenly.
 

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From what I've googled, it seems that one is V speed rated the other W. I believe the W tire will be stiffer.

I would buy two more Goodyears or maybe look for other V-rated tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got it, thanks. I do have the tires rotated at every oil change. Not sure why I ended up with uneven wear TBH... I'll probably just get the GY again. Maybe next time... but thanks for the advice.
 

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You want the tires with the best traction on the rear. That will be tricky, because the new tires might have best traction in the wet, but not otherwise.

If you find yourself having to hit the brakes on a fast onramp, you don't want to discover snap oversteer. I would replace all the tires. And then rotate them so that they wear evenly.
This is what tire places say to me, but then Scotty Kilmer said they are all idiots! Are you sure on that research?
 

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When you rotate tires, they will last even 15 000 km more.
 

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I prefer having newer tires up front, especially on a FWD car. I may be biased because my other car is mid engined & has no TCS/ESP so I'm used to an oversteer characteristic and would trade it for having the front wash out & understeer any day. "Snap" oversteer is simple oversteer that one is not prepared for nor has the ability to control. That said, the last thing I want is a car predisposed to understeer (front engine & FWD = heavier front weight bias) to then be set up go further understeer.

Then there's the old saying: oversteer scares the passengers, understeer scares the driver. Again, the truth is that at 'normal' and dare I say legal road speeds you'd be extremely hard pressed to truly enter either scenario at all save for the most hairpin of turns or sudden emergency maneuvers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Again, the truth is that at 'normal' and dare I say legal road speeds you'd be extremely hard pressed to truly enter either scenario at all save for the most hairpin of turns or sudden emergency maneuvers.
Do I take that as a 'as long as you don't drive like a maniac it'd be fine to have two different tire types on each axle'? :p

I can't be the only one who doesn't necessarily change all 4 tires at the same time... what happens when the ones you had have been discontinued?
 

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I prefer having newer tires up front, especially on a FWD car. I may be biased because my other car is mid engined & has no TCS/ESP so I'm used to an oversteer characteristic and would trade it for having the front wash out & understeer any day. "Snap" oversteer is simple oversteer that one is not prepared for nor has the ability to control. That said, the last thing I want is a car predisposed to understeer (front engine & FWD = heavier front weight bias) to then be set up go further understeer.

Then there's the old saying: oversteer scares the passengers, understeer scares the driver. Again, the truth is that at 'normal' and dare I say legal road speeds you'd be extremely hard pressed to truly enter either scenario at all save for the most hairpin of turns or sudden emergency maneuvers.
I spun my NG900 at an autocross. It seemed like an easy small chicane, then the back end went one way, then the other, and in about 1.5 seconds I was facing backwards.

I was once booting it on an onramp, only to go around the bend to discover that a slow truck was still....slow. Hitting the brakes, the rear end felt plenty loose. I do not want to repeat that.

I saw an autocross where the guy had only two R-compound tires. He put them on the front of his Omini GLH (I don't think it was a GLH-S) and spun hopelessly on every run.

Oversteer is what made the old Porsche 911 the "orthodontist killer", and I remember reading about snap oversteer in some BMWs that even trained race drivers could not catch. I think that was about 10 years ago.

I owned a number of RWD Firebirds/Trans Ams. Power on oversteer is relatively more controllable there than oversteer in a FWD car.

TL;DR: I am no fan of oversteer in FWD cars.

To the OP, I don't THINK that getting that new pair of tires would be the end of the world necessarily (it really does depend), but if you can find a new or gently used set of the same Goodyears, rotate them, and wear them all out, that is the safest solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To the OP, I don't THINK that getting that new pair of tires would be the end of the world necessarily (it really does depend), but if you can find a new or gently used set of the same Goodyears, rotate them, and wear them all out, that is the safest solution.
Yeah, I agree that's probably the best solution. I changed the rear ones less than a year ago, so surely if I do it right next time I need to change tires I can do all 4 at once. Thanks. My life's all about tires right now... just changed my motorcycle's rear one and I also need to change my wife's...
 

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I spun my NG900 at an autocross. It seemed like an easy small chicane, then the back end went one way, then the other, and in about 1.5 seconds I was facing backwards.

I was once booting it on an onramp, only to go around the bend to discover that a slow truck was still....slow. Hitting the brakes, the rear end felt plenty loose. I do not want to repeat that.

I saw an autocross where the guy had only two R-compound tires. He put them on the front of his Omini GLH (I don't think it was a GLH-S) and spun hopelessly on every run.

Oversteer is what made the old Porsche 911 the "orthodontist killer", and I remember reading about snap oversteer in some BMWs that even trained race drivers could not catch. I think that was about 10 years ago.

I owned a number of RWD Firebirds/Trans Ams. Power on oversteer is relatively more controllable there than oversteer in a FWD car.

TL;DR: I am no fan of oversteer in FWD cars.

To the OP, I don't THINK that getting that new pair of tires would be the end of the world necessarily (it really does depend), but if you can find a new or gently used set of the same Goodyears, rotate them, and wear them all out, that is the safest solution.
Just remember, whether FWD or RWD...when in doubt POWER out!

Again to the OP: I think you'll be fine either way. Most ppl feel more comfortable with understeer (which is why cars are typically set to understeer from the factory). Bottom line is if you're driving conservatively you'll be just fine. Just remember to make tire rotations more frequent in the future, doing them with oil changes (or every other change) is an easy way to remember.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I actually do, believe it or not... every oil change. And I don't wait forever between oil changes either, I do them on schedule... not sure why I ended up with two tires needing replacement a year before the other two.

Then again I'm a cheap ******* so it's very possible that they could have used replacing at the time and I figured two was less expensive than four! :-D
 

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Just remember, whether FWD or RWD...when in doubt POWER out!
True unless you find yourself really needing to slow down. That can happen if you misjudge a curve, or someone is in front of you, or if you get cut off. Then you're screwed.

A while back (five years?) one of the magazines, probably Car and Driver, had a full-page flowchart/game that started with "You discover that you have entered a curve too quickly with your air-cooled 911. What do you do?" Most of the choices lead to crashes.
 
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