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Ok, so I have quite an explanation ahead, but If you have any experience with this sensor or with sensor wiring in general, I would greatly appreciate your input -- thanks in advance!

A few weeks back, I got a CEL and autozone read it as a "high intake air temperature" code. Well, my haynes manual directed me to the sensor (on top of the intake manifold) and I started looking for a replacement sensor online. PROBLEM: mine is a THREE wire sensor while it appears that most other SAABs have a two wire sensor. Every OEM and aftermarket sensor I looked at online had only two connecters, so I went ahead and ordered one. After it arrived, I realized it would have to be modified to work with the current connector, so I rigged up a way of connecting the sensor to the connector with alligator clips with bits of stripped wire on the other end (to shove into the connector slots). Well, when connected to the outer wires on the connecter (the middle one I determined by color to be the odd one out) my whole set up actually worked! the car idled perfectly (exactly what it wouldn't do when other combinations of wires were hooked up.
PROBLEM 2: well, I wanted a more permanent connection, so I chose to start cutting, stripping and soldering the wires into the correct set up for the new connecter, leaving the middle wire disconnected and taking advantage of its slot in the connecter for one of the outer wires. Well, after a lot of careful work, the car will not idle any more -- it runs very rich and sounds like it might even be backfiring while idling.

So, my question ends up being: has anyone delt with this three-two wire conundrum and what is the best way to reduce electrical resistance when splicing/piggybacking wires?
 

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I'm pretty sure that is the intake pressure sensor. The intake air temp sensor is on the turbo pipe behind the turbo bypass valve I believe - on the right side of the engine as you look at it.

There's a bunch of confusing info on this as i was looking into my air intake sensor as well.
 

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I'd hook the original sensor back up. Remove the neg battery terminal for a little while to clear anything stored. Wait and see if the code comes back. If it does, only replace the sensor with the exact same replacement. Cross your fingers you didn't cook something in the computer. DO NOT run the car anymore in it's current state. I don't know enough about that particular sensor, but I'm guessing you either replaced the wrong sensor, or the sensor you have is meant for another model year.
 

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Also, if your intercooler fins are coated/clogged with a bunch of dirt, it's *possible* that it's not working as efficiently as a newer one would, and after some hard driving the intake temps spiked, causing the CEL to trigger. I like to remove the nozzle from my garden hose, then with an open ended flow of water, put it up to the fins and let it "rinse" the dirt away. Radiators can benefit from the same treatment. Excessive dirt will clog the fins over time. Looking at the fins might not give any clues. You'll know the area has been cleaned as the water will clear up after passing over the fins. Then move on to the next row. I've seen semis overheat because of dirt in the radiator fins (their radiators are like the size of our hoods LOL). The intercooler is essentially the same, but with air running through it, instead of coolant. It's a "free" thing to try.
 
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