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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

I need to flush and drain my coolant urgently. I have only water in it now and I need to put some anti-freeze and anti-boil in it.

I can not find an answer or how to do it anywhere!!

Please tell me how do i get the water out??? So that it is empty and I can put some good stuff in?

Thanks a lot lot!!!

Mati
 

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You have a few options. Any of them will empty most of the coolant but if you combine all three and then also flush the system with running water from a hose pipe then you will get everything out.

1. Block drain plug - underneath exhaust manifold. It has a drain plug on the surface of the fitting but that plug is usually corroded shut and it is better to whip out the three bolts holding the assembly to the side of the engine block. Obviously, as you do this the water will start to gush out so have a bucket ready. You will also have to reseal the join between the assembly and the block. I would recommend you use Loctite 518 as the sealant (Saab specification) but it can be bought in very few places and is always expensive. They will have a tube for you to buy if you go to the dealer.

2. Radiator drain plug. If you are sitting in the drivers seat facing forwards the drain plug is at the bottom right-hand corner of the radiator. Last time I used this I activly extracted the fluid using a fluid extractor as I thought it would suck out more of the coolant than if I just left it to gravity.

3. Remove the lower radiator hose.

Tip - if putting any water into the system always use clean / pure or soft water. Hard water will scale the insides of the system and block it all up with limescale.
 

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mmustillo said:
Hey,

I need to flush and drain my coolant urgently. I have only water in it now and I need to put some anti-freeze and anti-boil in it.

I can not find an answer or how to do it anywhere!!

Please tell me how do i get the water out??? So that it is empty and I can put some good stuff in?

Thanks a lot lot!!!

Mati
It's fairly simple. You should put a good quality flush chemical in the water, run the engine up to temp, let it cool enough to be safe, then drain the coolant via the drain port at the lower-right rear corner of the radiator.

This won't get all the coolant out as there will still be some left in the engine block. There is a coolant drain plug for the engine block under the exhaust manifold, but often it's easier to undo the hose going into the cylinder head from the heater control valve (hope I have that right - someone will correct me if not!) and put a garden hose into the opening to force out the coolant left in the block.

Remember too that you need to make sure the heater control valve is set to 'hot' so it's completely open and when you push out remaining coolant with the garden hose, having the heater control valve open will allow the heater core to also flush out via the top valve opening that you've undone the hose from.

If you have a Saab service manual, like a Bentley, it describes how to flush and drain coolant, but it assumes you will undo the cylinder block coolant drain plug as well as using the radiator drain plug. I find the cylinder block coolant drain plug is a pain in the butt to get to.

After you're sure all the old coolant has been drained and/or pushed out using a garden hose to force out anything that's left over, close up the radiator drain plug (and the cylinder block coolant drain plug if you used it), re-connect the hose to the heater control valve, re-fill the system with new coolant mix via the expansion tank, and open the bleeder nipple on the thermostat housing until a steady slow flow of coolant with no bubbles is coming out.

Start the engine, let it sit for a minute to get all the new coolant circulating and to check that the water pump is doing it's job (keep the heater control valve on hot so the heater core also gets the new coolant mix through it), then open the thermostat housing bleeder nipple again so any remaining air bubbles come out. Once that's done, close up the bleeder nipple, top up the expansion tank again if need be, then let the engine come up to normal temp (fans cycle on and off) making sure there aren't any coolant leaks.

After that's done, go for a bit of a drive and make sure the cooling system works to regulate the coolant temp. That way you'll also be checking that the thermostat and the radiator are in good condition.

Using plain water in the coolant system is fine for emergencies but you shouldn't leave it like that for long, esp. if you drive the car a lot. Plain water has no anti-corrosive properties which can result in internal corrosion damage to the alloy cylinder heads (esp. on the older 8V engines).

Craig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
c900 said:
It's fairly simple. You should put a good quality flush chemical in the water, run the engine up to temp, let it cool enough to be safe, then drain the coolant via the drain port at the lower-right rear corner of the radiator.

This won't get all the coolant out as there will still be some left in the engine block. There is a coolant drain plug for the engine block under the exhaust manifold, but often it's easier to undo the hose going into the cylinder head from the heater control valve (hope I have that right - someone will correct me if not!) and put a garden hose into the opening to force out the coolant left in the block.

Remember too that you need to make sure the heater control valve is set to 'hot' so it's completely open and when you push out remaining coolant with the garden hose, having the heater control valve open will allow the heater core to also flush out via the top valve opening that you've undone the hose from.

If you have a Saab service manual, like a Bentley, it describes how to flush and drain coolant, but it assumes you will undo the cylinder block coolant drain plug as well as using the radiator drain plug. I find the cylinder block coolant drain plug is a pain in the butt to get to.

After you're sure all the old coolant has been drained and/or pushed out using a garden hose to force out anything that's left over, close up the radiator drain plug (and the cylinder block coolant drain plug if you used it), re-connect the hose to the heater control valve, re-fill the system with new coolant mix via the expansion tank, and open the bleeder nipple on the thermostat housing until a steady slow flow of coolant with no bubbles is coming out.

Start the engine, let it sit for a minute to get all the new coolant circulating and to check that the water pump is doing it's job (keep the heater control valve on hot so the heater core also gets the new coolant mix through it), then open the thermostat housing bleeder nipple again so any remaining air bubbles come out. Once that's done, close up the bleeder nipple, top up the expansion tank again if need be, then let the engine come up to normal temp (fans cycle on and off) making sure there aren't any coolant leaks.

After that's done, go for a bit of a drive and make sure the cooling system works to regulate the coolant temp. That way you'll also be checking that the thermostat and the radiator are in good condition.

Using plain water in the coolant system is fine for emergencies but you shouldn't leave it like that for long, esp. if you drive the car a lot. Plain water has no anti-corrosive properties which can result in internal corrosion damage to the alloy cylinder heads (esp. on the older 8V engines).

Craig.

Hey Craig!

I wish you were in canberra so much!! I dont want to sound stupid but I am still confused. I know I would do something wrong so I dont want to risk it if im not sure!
And to pay a garage to do it im not that keen about it..

So im so confused. I will be driving about 1200 KM next weekend to my grandparents, but i cant drive with watter in it!!
I neeeed help... :-(

mati
 

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mmustillo said:
Hey Craig!

I wish you were in canberra so much!! I dont want to sound stupid but I am still confused. I know I would do something wrong so I dont want to risk it if im not sure!
And to pay a garage to do it im not that keen about it..

So im so confused. I will be driving about 1200 KM next weekend to my grandparents, but i cant drive with watter in it!!
I neeeed help... :-(
I'd be happy to help if I was n the ACT. I bought my 81 turbo from someone in Canberra btw.

Anyway... the simplest way to do it without worrying about any of the finer points is turn the heater control valve to hot, warm up the engine until the fans cycle, turn the engine off, wait a while until it's cool enough that you won't burn yourself on metal parts or with hot water, drain via the drain port at the back of the radiator down near the main earth connection (keep the heater control valve on 'hot' all the time), then once the water stops coming out, close the drain plug up and refill the system with new coolant mix.

Doing it that way you'll still have a bit of water left in the heater core and some in the engine block, so make the coolant mix a bit stronger than 1:1 (assuming you use something like Nulon Long-Life Coolant which meets the Saab spec), say 70 percent coolant to 30 percent water when you mix it up, and put that in via the expansion tank. The stronger mix of coolant will then dilute with the left over water as the water pump pushes coolant around the system and you should get close to the proper 1:1 mixture, esp. once the thermostat heats up and opens the path for coolant to flow through the radiator.

You will have to bleed the cooling system via the thermostat housing bleeder nipple to make sure there are no air bubbles in the system. That's the only super-critical step apart from making sure you re-tighten the radiator drain plug so all the fresh coolant doesn't run out. The drain plug is brass so it shouldn't be over-tightened.

I've used this method before when I was in a hurry. :cool: Make sure if you don't want heat in the car that you close the heater control valve again or you'll get toasty. lol

Craig.

PS. With the Nulon Long-Life Coolant, I buy the 5 litre bottle which makes 10 litres of coolant (1:1 mix with clean water). You should use about 6 to 8 litres of coolant+water mix to fill up the cooling system once all the air is bled out, and then you'll have a few litres of coolant spare that you can keep in the mixed-up state so if you ever need a top-up out on the road, you have some coolant mix on-hand.
 

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good write up. that about sums it up. flushing or draining the coolant isnt difficult at all. I had to do it with when I changed the heater hoses and core. not a biggie. you can do it!:cool:
 

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Here's a simple seven-step plan, matt.

1. Set heater control to max.
2. Remove expansion tank cap.
3. Loosen 17mm drain plug at bottom right of radiator -- coolant will flow out.
4. Tighten drain plug (careful, not too tight -- most common mistake made by learners is damage through over-tightening).
5. Open 11mm bleeder on thermostat.
6. Pour coolant slowly into expansion tank.
7. Tighten bleeder (again, not too tight) when coolant starts flowing out steadily.

Then for the first couple of days, keep a close eye on the coolant level and top up as necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks!

SpecialTool said:
Here's a simple seven-step plan, matt.

1. Set heater control to max.
2. Remove expansion tank cap.
3. Loosen 17mm drain plug at bottom right of radiator -- coolant will flow out.
4. Tighten drain plug (careful, not too tight -- most common mistake made by learners is damage through over-tightening).
5. Open 11mm bleeder on thermostat.
6. Pour coolant slowly into expansion tank.
7. Tighten bleeder (again, not too tight) when coolant starts flowing out steadily.

Then for the first couple of days, keep a close eye on the coolant level and top up as necessary.
Ok I got it but where is the bleeder and the thermostat??? and what screw on the thermostat?

thanks a lot lot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
okok

ok,

I have found the bleeder on the thermostat but my Cooler radiator does not have a drain plug. there is no screw on the bottom of the radiator.. so i guess that i have to take off the rubber tubes...?

hmm..
 

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mmustillo said:
ok,

I have found the bleeder on the thermostat but my Cooler radiator does not have a drain plug. there is no screw on the bottom of the radiator.. so i guess that i have to take off the rubber tubes...?

hmm..
No drain plug? You sure it's not hiding behind the battery?

OK, if you're sure it's not there, just undo the bottom hose instead -- it's on the other (passenger) side.
 

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Many people (including the manufacturer) think it's a bad idea to use Flushing Chemicals.
 

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just a garden hose and then when done run some purified spring water(from grocer) or denatured water through the system to get out the hose water. then fill er' up with the 50/50
 

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davidlytle said:
just a garden hose and then when done run some purified spring water(from grocer) or denatured water through the system to get out the hose water. then fill er' up with the 50/50
Yup, And I guess if you want to get fussy you could mix yer antifreeze w/ distilled water.
 

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Thats what I meant. I couldnt think of the word. distilled water is the best but spring water and distilled water is what you should use to mix with the coolant. Thanks grif
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks man!

SpecialTool said:
No drain plug? You sure it's not hiding behind the battery?

OK, if you're sure it's not there, just undo the bottom hose instead -- it's on the other (passenger) side.

Hi,

yesterday I had some time so I had a look behind the battery and i foud the drain plug!! It is on the bottom side.. I thought is is under the car so I kept on crawling under it.

So to get the water out I just unscrew the drain plug? let the watter run out? then flush it with clean watter..?

yup?

thanks!!
 

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grif900 said:
Ive seen flushing chems. loosen every freeze-plug on a Ford V-6, I would not recomend any of them.
Most engine blocks are made of cast iron with steel freeze plugs. Ford engine blocks are made of compressed rust with iron oxide freeze plugs :lol: :lol:
 

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The leaky Ford tortoise I mentioned was a result of the best of intentions and a nasty Prestone product.The Owner, who thought it would be nice to flush the cars cooling system himself before leaving for a weeklong family roadtrip, was ready to hang himself. We had to pull the motor to get to all of the plugs. Ford has a better idea (old ad. slogan), But I'll be damned if I can figure out what it is. Will that happen if one were to use the same stuff on their Saab? I don't know, and I don't want to find out. I'll stick with Clean water from the garden hose.
 
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