SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

i got my new headgasket today... its an elring one... :D:D

i read some thread on the forum, some ppl said i wont need to use sealant for new type of gasket.. so... is my gasket the new type?? how do i know?? the part number is 766.624..

if the sealant is not required, i will do the head gasket job tomorrow on chirstmas :D:D

cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,382 Posts
No sealant! for new type or old type ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,347 Posts
900t said:
No sealant! for new type or old type ;)
Quite a lot of techs use a bead of gasket maker around the outside edge of a new head gasket to give additional sealing, though if the head (and mounting surface on the block) are prepared properly no additional sealing should be needed. Most of the sealing comes from proper prep, and correct tightening of the head bolts IMHO.

Craig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,373 Posts
c900 said:
Quite a lot of techs use a bead of gasket maker around the outside edge of a new head gasket to give additional sealing, though if the head (and mounting surface on the block) are prepared properly no additional sealing should be needed. Most of the sealing comes from proper prep, and correct tightening of the head bolts IMHO.

Craig.
With all due respect, your post confuses the reader. The Elring gasket is a dry-fit type.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,625 Posts
Nobody knows what maximum safe pressure is, I know what normal pressure is though.
With the engine idling at normal temperature (3/4 on the gauge) the coolant usually generates about 5-7 psi. The cap should start to release at about 13 psi.
These numbers come from many measurements on new c900s with a Stant pressure gauge/pressure tester; I don't know what the factory spec. numbers are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
For me, no sealant meant major oil leakage. Replaced it, and followed townsends instructions, no leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
I think it is important to remember that when people are talking about sealent they are talking about the bottem edge and the outside area of the timing cover where the oil is prone to leaking, and leaving the compression area and water passage area alone, right? (remember, a little bit goes a LONG way, you do not want to build these areas up AT ALL) I would never put anything near the compressoin area of the gasket, ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
Yes absolutely. Its just that where the head meets the block end plate, there seems to be a gap that the head gasket alone can't seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,382 Posts
Did you put the screws from timing cover to head back?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,625 Posts
No sealer means no sealer.
The gasket has a line of red stuff, bonded to it. That is sealer that responds to heat and pressure. The addition of other sealers will prevent the embedded sealer from working properly. I've replaced countless head gaskets, never used a sealer (probably would have been fired if anyone caught me doing it) and never had a problem with subsequent oil leaks.
When you remove the timing cover or flywheel seal end plate, leaving the head gasket in place, SAAB recommends some RTV or 518 on the used portion of the head gasket only, as the original seal will have been contaminated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
dasander said:
I think it is important to remember that when people are talking about sealent they are talking about the bottem edge and the outside area of the timing cover where the oil is prone to leaking, and leaving the compression area and water passage area alone, right? (remember, a little bit goes a LONG way, you do not want to build these areas up AT ALL) I would never put anything near the compressoin area of the gasket, ever.
When I was doing mine, two of the passageways had severe pitting so I used a little sealant. I applied A LITTLE with a cotton but and rubbed it into the pitted area. I then wiped off the excess. I think if I was doing it again I would limit it to the outside edge of the passageway, (and also to seal the oil) to make sure it wouldn't spread to the metal compression sealing ring. The gasket I fitted had what looked like a red O-ring embedded into the gasket to seal off the oil. I had fitted a new timing cover gasket, which I trimmed very carefully. If the head gasket is sitting down on an old gasket, slightly different rules might apply regarding sealant? I cleaned my surfaces with carb. cleaner to ensure there was absolutely no grease left and all the solvent was gone.
There is a pic about half way down on this page
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=117282
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,677 Posts
ella_2007 said:
btw, whats the maximum safe pressure in cooling system??
Check what the rating of the cap on the reservoir is and i guess the safe pressure is below that! Its 1.1 bar on 99's IIRC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Matthew said:
You can use JB Weld chemical metal to repair pitting in the deck of the block. If the engine's been stripped down the the block can be skimmed.
I heard about that on another site (maybe jag, I think) before I used the silicone based . The temp arround the passageways can't me much in excess of 100C, so I decided to try it. I hope it will last. After starting the car I got a very slow leak in the head gasket area. But, it turned out to be coming from the inlet manifold gasket (I must admit I didn't examine this as well). Then, to scare me even more, after repairing it, there still seemed to be a leak. The water was after lodging in the gasket gap between the block and head, and flowed out because of the engine vibrations. Once it emptied, the 'leak' stopped.... something to keep inmind for future repairs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,347 Posts
9008v said:
I heard about that on another site (maybe jag, I think) before I used the silicone based . The temp arround the passageways can't me much in excess of 100C, so I decided to try it. I hope it will last. After starting the car I got a very slow leak in the head gasket area. But, it turned out to be coming from the inlet manifold gasket (I must admit I didn't examine this as well). Then, to scare me even more, after repairing it, there still seemed to be a leak. The water was after lodging in the gasket gap between the block and head, and flowed out because of the engine vibrations. Once it emptied, the 'leak' stopped.... something to keep inmind for future repairs!
That sounds eerily similar to the 16V non-turbo engine in my 89 16V car. It has a weep of coolant from the front-right corner of the engine (very noticable when cold) and the only place I can figure it coming from is between the head and block. I've double-checked all the coolant hoses and pipes in that area and apart from a weep out of the gasket for the A/C high-temp cutout thermoswitch (which is well away from the engine itself), nothing else is leaking coolant.

As I am planning to put my spare turbo to work on that engine next year when I acquire the last few items (turbo ex. manifold and turbo exhaust components being the main stuff I still need now), I'm considering two options - either pulling the valve cover and making sure all the headbolts are properly tightended, or getting drastic and pulling the head entirely to see if the head gasket has a problem or there's some small crack or hole that the gasket isn't quite filling in the head-to-block mating surfaces.

It's unlikely to actually be that since you'd think it'd cause problems when running, but I've never found a pressurised-leak of coolant when the engine is going.

Hmmm

Craig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
c900 said:
That sounds eerily similar to the 16V non-turbo engine in my 89 16V car. It has a weep of coolant from the front-right corner of the engine (very noticable when cold) and the only place I can figure it coming from is between the head and block. I've double-checked all the coolant hoses and pipes in that area and apart from a weep out of the gasket for the A/C high-temp cutout thermoswitch (which is well away from the engine itself), nothing else is leaking coolant.

As I am planning to put my spare turbo to work on that engine next year when I acquire the last few items (turbo ex. manifold and turbo exhaust components being the main stuff I still need now), I'm considering two options - either pulling the valve cover and making sure all the headbolts are properly tightended, or getting drastic and pulling the head entirely to see if the head gasket has a problem or there's some small crack or hole that the gasket isn't quite filling in the head-to-block mating surfaces.

It's unlikely to actually be that since you'd think it'd cause problems when running, but I've never found a pressurised-leak of coolant when the engine is going.

Hmmm

Craig.
If there is a loose bolt, it is possible that when the engine heats up the aluminium head would expand more than the bolt, and seal the leak. On my 8v, it only takes a few min. to take off the cover. It might be worth trying the simpler soln first. Anyway, you would probably guess if the torque is the problem, by the ammount the bolt tightens.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top