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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm starting a new thread because I sorta drifted from my original post.

Started dismanteling the head today. I've got everything unbolted (oh and just so you know, its not an "unbolt and blot it back up" job :evil: )

I can't get the head off because its catching near the chain guide. If you look down into the head near the cam sprockets, there is the chain tensioner to the left. I've unbolted the bolt and removed it and the spring but I don't know where to go from there. Can I slide the piston back to clear the guide? I REALLY do not want to have to take the engine mount bracket off. I was hoping someone had a trick of tip.
 

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From memory, you do have to remove the engine mount bracket.

I can't think what you mean about the piston? You can't just push the piston back because it's a ratchet mechanism so you need to remove the whole chain tensioner assembly. You're going to have to do this anyway to reset it.

You are leaving the exhaust manifold on aren't you and just undoing the 4 nuts at the turbo flange?

You did buy a replacement turbo flange gasket too didn't you? ;)

David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I bought the gasket "set" as indicated with my conversation with eeuroparts. Ok I'm game. How do I remove the tensioner? I assume it has to come out so I can remove the head?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just a clarification, I removed the bracket which goes from the engine to the fender. The bracket that is mounted to the block (which also has the alternator attached) I left in place. It looks to be a b*stard to remove. Will this have to come off?

Another question, does anyone know the wrench size for the chain tensioner?

And what is a balance shaft? I've a 95CSE turbo. Do I have one, do I need to look out for anything?

How about feeding the chain? Should I do this by turning the engine over or can I just attach the new chain and pull it through?

Lastly, cam sprockets, they do not look like they need to come off for the head to be removed. I'm only doing the gasket and chain.
 

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dmtinker said:
Just a clarification, I removed the bracket which goes from the engine to the fender. The bracket that is mounted to the block (which also has the alternator attached) I left in place. It looks to be a b*stard to remove. Will this have to come off?
Yep, the alternator bracket has to come off. :) It's not that hard to be honest once you realise you have to remove it.

Another question, does anyone know the wrench size for the chain tensioner?
From memory, 27mm.
And what is a balance shaft? I've a 95CSE turbo. Do I have one, do I need to look out for anything?
You have 2, they are driven at twice crank speed and are there to reduce higher order harmonics by opposing the forces of the crank moving parts. They are driven by a little chain and the sprockets wear and the chain can break and cause all kinds of mayhem. Of course, you won't be able to inspect this little lot when you just roll on your new split link chain. When I did mine, like others, I just left the balance chain off. It's cheaper because I didn't have to buy the set of bits and I know it will never fail in the future. :D
How about feeding the chain? Should I do this by turning the engine over or can I just attach the new chain and pull it through?
There's a procedure to be followed as you have to keep the old chain taught. Although having said that, since you're taking the head off tension really isn't an issue because you're going to have to time it all up again on reassembly so as long as you can pull the chain through you'll be ok. Turn the engine over with a socket on the crank pully.
Lastly, cam sprockets, they do not look like they need to come off for the head to be removed. I'm only doing the gasket and chain.
You've managed to get the old chain off without taking the sprockets off? I think you're after too many shortcuts here, remove the sprockets, it will go easier.
 

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I want to show you a picture of what you won't be able to inspect while just rolling on the new chain:-

Here's a lovely pic of the timing gear showing mostly the balance shaft assembly on the left and removed on the right. That little chain is also prone to wear and stretching so you do your roll on for the timing chain and still end up with failure/rattling of the balance chain and in order to do this job, it is highly recommended to remove the head to avoid damange to the head gasket when refitting the timing cover. Thus if you choose/need to do this in future, the head is coming off again!


 

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Some of this you have already done:-

Removal
1) Remove turbocharger (if equipped) and exhaust manifold as

an assembly. See EXHAUST MANIFOLD. Disconnect lead from temperature

sender. Remove intake manifold. See INTAKE MANIFOLD. Remove engine

mount bolts from cylinder head.

2) Disconnect hoses from valve cover. Remove ignition

cartridge and valve cover. Rotate crankshaft to align "0" mark on

flywheel with timing mark on flywheel cover. Remove camshaft sprockets

and chain tensioner. Remove 2 timing cover-to-cylinder head bolts.

3) Detach starter lead from clip on thermostat housing.

Remove cylinder head bolts. Install guide pin into top right corner of

cylinder head. Ensure timing chain is positioned so that pivoting

chain guide does not obstruct cylinder head. Lift cylinder head from

engine.

Inspection

Check for cracks. Inspect valve seats and refinish as

necessary. Check cylinder head height after resurfacing. See

CYLINDER HEAD table under ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS.

Installation

1) Place NEW gasket on cylinder block. Rotate crankshaft to

TDC position of No. 1 piston. Align camshafts with their respective

timing marks. Position timing chain in pivot guide.

2) Install guide pin into top right corner of cylinder head.

Lubricate cylinder head bolts and washers before installation. Tighten

cylinder head bolts in sequence. See Fig. 1. Tighten bolts to an

initial torque of 44 ft. lbs. (60 N.m). Then tighten bolts to 59 ft.

lbs. (80 N.m). Finally, tighten each bolt an additional 90 degrees.

3) Install sprocket for intake camshaft first, then remaining

sprocket. Ensure timing chain is positioned correctly between guides.

To complete installation, reverse removal procedure. Tighten bolts to

specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS.
http://www.kyankton.net/images/enlarged/lr_9000_051.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great, I really appreciate the help. I as said before but may not have been clear. I bought a manual on CD which is terrible. Also, I ran out of toner so I can't print anything out.

So I'm not taking shortcuts, I'm operating a little blind. I'm under a lot of pressure to get this running. The car my wife is driving now is quickly dying. Of course I don't want to mess anything up but at the same time I can't screw around.

Another question (I know you're probably getting tired of me) on one part it says to align the O with the timing part on the flywheel and then its says after the head is back on to place the piston at TDC. Why should I align the timing marks before hand? Is it the same as putting the piston at TDC?

Also, when I fit the new headgasket does it require gasket sealer?
Is there an easy way to remove the alternator bracket? I can't seem to get at the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just wanted to emphasize again how much I apprecaite your help.
 

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dmtinker said:
Another question (I know you're probably getting tired of me) on one part it says to align the O with the timing part on the flywheel and then its says after the head is back on to place the piston at TDC. Why should I align the timing marks before hand? Is it the same as putting the piston at TDC?

Also, when I fit the new headgasket does it require gasket sealer?
Is there an easy way to remove the alternator bracket? I can't seem to get at the bolts.
Don't worry, I'll stop helping when I get fed up ;). Lets start with the alternator bracket, you're going to need to remove the belt and then undo the alternator top bolt to move the alternator out of the way so that you can get at the bolts. It's quite doable but I guess the level of difficulty will depend on your tool set and appropriate socket extensions.

With regard to the timing, I don't see that it makes any difference when you do it, only that if you've set things to TDC, when you dismantle it can make it a little easier to make a note of where things are such that they look right when you realign. I didn't use the flywheel marks anyway, I popped a long rod into the no.1 spark plug hole and waited for it to come to the top of its stroke and then set the cams from there.

No sealant for the head gasket but do use a new one for the turbo flange otherwise you'll be doing that one again shortly.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I removed the bracket and I must say it and the tensioner location are not what I'd call the best engineering. I don't see how you would get the tensioner off without removing the head.

Anyway, yes the gasket was blown. I don't see any cracks in the head itself. I'll clean it up and look closer. I assume I can use bronse wool on it without doing any damage?

The head gasket has something like permatex on it. I'm wondering if this cause premature failure. If it doesn't call for such, would this lead to the gasket getting hosed?

Also, you may yell at me but I didn't remove the turbo. All but two of the exhaust studs came out and I was able to lift the head off with no problem.
 

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I don't get the problem with the chain tensioner, you just use a long reach 27mm socket and it just unscrews. ;)

Also, no problem with leaving the turbo behind, you did just unscrew the four nuts on the turbo to manifold flange though didn't you?

You need to carefully check that the head is still flat after an overheat otherwise you will need to get it skimmed. Don't skip this, it still might be worth getting it pressure tested so that you don't waste your time putting it back on to find that you get grief immediately after.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
It was flat using a straigh edge but I think I'll try to find a machine shop around here.

I've up loaded some pics.

Yes the turbo is still attached, no I did not disconnect it. I read your post after it was out.

Also, pulling the chain through, I know i have to attach the new one to the old one but do I have to crimp the master link or can I just slide it through with it loose? Do you have any suggestions about crimping the link. I don't have tool for it.
 

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I have no idea about what's best for that roll on chain. You've probably read between the lines that I just don't go for that idea. :) I used a "normal" chain.

If I may offer one suggestion since you've disconnected all the exhaust manifold studs. Replace them all with NEW studs. Yes, all of 'em. It seems to be quite popular for them to shear when replacing and yes I know they probably all look just fine and why should you bother?

Trust me on this one. I was torquing down my studs and you guessed it, one of them sheared flush with the head. Fortunately, I hadn't torqued the head down so didn't waste a gasket and stretch my nice new head bolts but it did mean wrestling with the head for a second time to lift it off and then the added couple of hours drilling and extracting the broken stud. Since you have the head on a bench for the extra tiny amount of money, just replace all the studs and you'll be smiling that they won't die on you when you refit.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah, I think replacing the studs is a good idea. I noticed that the very bottom right and very bottom left studs were only 3 threads deep. I don't know if this is normal or not.

Has anyone out there used a roll on chain? How did you do it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How flat is flat? I checked the head with a framing square and found the the center of the head is about 1mm out of flat. Is that close enough? Does anyone know the tolerance?
 

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dmtinker said:
How flat is flat? I checked the head with a framing square and found the the center of the head is about 1mm out of flat. Is that close enough? Does anyone know the tolerance?
That's bent. Off to the machine shop you go...

Tolerance is around 0.002 " or 0.05mm
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can I sand it with a belt sander? :cheesy: Just kidding. I did have an uncle who did the with break disks. We took them away from him.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
ok, found out that there is a special link tool sold by Saab, it seems that they (at times) will replace the timing chain with a pull through.
 

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dmtinker said:
ok, found out that there is a special link tool sold by Saab, it seems that they (at times) will replace the timing chain with a pull through.
*If* the sprockets and guides are in good condition they will. ;)
 
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