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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
vnv727 said:
With a socket wrench...
Saab Crazy,

Come here and turn around so I can smack you in the back of the head!:cheesy:

Duh, I mean without having a torque wrench at my disposal is there a way to judge the torque on the bolts?
 

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There's no way to judge the torque...

Invest in a torque wrench, they're not that expensive and you'll use it for lots of stuff, including checking the lug nuts for proper torque. If you're going to do the head bolts considering getting a torque angle gauge, available at autozone etc and only like $10 or so. Head bolts (and lug nuts) are not exactly areas you want to take a guess at.....There was a story on another website about a display at a trade show where you could try to torque a bolt to a certain torque based on feel, if you got it within something like 10% you won a free torque wrench. No one got close, and these were pros.....
 

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Put it another way. The cost of a quality torque wrench is nothing compared to the cost of sorting out a blown head gasket if the bolts are not tightened correctly. To do the job you will need the angular torgue wrench in addition to a "normal" one where you set the torque, although I've heard that the final 90 degree tightening is not recommended with used bolts, but step the torque up. There's a good discussion of this on http://www.saabscene.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=31629731

The 9000 has a tendancy for the head bolts to loosen over time and re-torquing should be done at around 100K miles as a matter of routine, but I don't think it's on the official service schedule
 

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Rainbird said:
To do the job you will need the angular torgue wrench in addition to a "normal" one where you set the torque...
I've never heard of an "angular torque wrench" for automotive use, the SAAB manual only requires the use of a torque wrench.
I've heard that the final 90 degree tightening is not recommended with used bolts...
SAAB does not require the use of new head bolts ever; they're endlessly reusable until they exceed the unstretched length limit. See http://www.oliver-rods.com/library/libraryindex.html for good information on torque-to-angle bolts.If you skip the 90 degree step, the bolts can't work in their intended range.
The 9000 has a tendancy for the head bolts to loosen over time and re-torquing should be done at around 100K miles as a matter of routine, but I don't think it's on the official service schedule...
SAAB has not required head re-torque (at the 1000 mile service) since about 1988, and never suggested "routine" re-torque.
 

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Jim Mesthene said:
I've never heard of an "angular torque wrench" for automotive use, the SAAB manual only requires the use of a torque wrench.
I referred to the type of torque measurement device which allows you to measure an angle of movement needed for the third stage of the torquing process

SAAB does not require the use of new head bolts ever
Saab in the UK specify that head bolts should be used a maximum of three times. Beyond this the probability of stretching beyond the point of use is too high

SAAB has not required head re-torque (at the 1000 mile service) since about 1988, and never suggested "routine" re-torque.
They don't, but UK spec 9000s are known for leaking oil from the front N/S corner of the head. This is generally as a result of the head bolts getting a bit loose. I don't know whether they are stretching or if the gasket is getting compressed with the repeated heat / cool cycles. They generally need tightening up at around 100,000 (100K) miles.
 

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This what I did. Used new bolts but I'm not going to get into the new/used debate.


Using the torque pattern in Haynes, I loosened all the bolts to 1st stage torque, then one by one, took a bolt out and replaced with new and torqued to 1st stage. Even if you don't replace, its a good idea to take the old ones out, clean all the threads and and thoroughly lube as the torque values are for lubricated threads. Also a good idea to blow out the threads in the block to make sure there is no coolant or oil that has pooled which could lead to stripped threads.

Then I went to stage 2 and finally the 90 degree torque. I didn't use a guage, just eyeballed it. Use a breaker bar for the final 90, its really tight.
 
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