SaabCentral Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every one I get, someone has snapped off the threaded end, and the remaining stub is below the surface of the tube and not even.
I'll get it out but anyone who says "they are easy, they just tap out" will get an earful from me. This is the 3rd one that I have got.
At least both the engine and transmission drain plugs are out.
This one is so bad that the person who pull the trans cut the joint tube with a hack saw. I am going to have to slit the tube on both side to get it away from the shift rod so I can work on the taper pin.
On the positive side, the trans looks good inside. I don't think it will need anything inside. just lots of external clean-up and new drivers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,590 Posts
That's easy!
If somone has already totally screwed the pooch, reshape the end of an air hammer punch so there's a nub at the end that contacts the pin only; maybe 3/16". One shot with that and the pin will fly out (put transmission in 4th so the shaft is better supported).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
By the time I got it, the broken end was peened good, I am going to get the tube off and clean up the end so I have something to hit.
I don't really want to spend a time at a grinder on one of my air punches. Everything I have would take a fair bit of grinding, I think the smallest I have is 3/8th or larger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,590 Posts
File it flush, The tip only needs to be 3/16" long too.Harbor freight will sell you a punch cheap.
Or, invent your own way. One guy ground a C-clamp to do the same thing. His gizmo worked but it was fiddly. The air hammer took seconds to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've got a few ideas in my head for a tool, but most will take more time to make than it will to get the pin out. Only makes sense if I am going to do more of them.
I have some schedule 160 pipe with 1/4" wall thickness that is great for making puller tools and brackets. and the like. I could make a tool that centers on the large end and has a forcing screw, but all that fab and threading takes time.
The nearest H/F is 89 miles one way, to far to go for a cheap punch.
I don't have a problem with the taper pin, it is used in aircraft all the time, in fact the pin has an AN number, it is with those that overtighten the nut until the pin shears then beat on it, that anger me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, kinda sorta both. I guess it was more of a rant than anything, Hard day yesterday.
One great way I have come across on a similar but larger pin is a thread at both ends and a bushing at the small end, Remove the nut and bushing a place over the large end and thread the nut on to pull the pin. The bushing is just a thick washer and all you have to do is break the taper, so you don't "pull it" all the way.
Germans were good about providing integral means to disassemble. Some British stuff does also.
Out where I am there is no quick easy, Either I make something or have to drive to get something to make into a punch or mail order something to modify or spend a long time grinding one of my large (air) punches down to work on this small pin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,101 Posts
I never really understood why the taper pin... Is it just something easy to work with on assembly? Why not a nut & bolt? Or a roll pin? The rubber isolator is already super sloppy... a tight fitting taper pin doesn't seem like the key element in a good shifter. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is a common method of attaching control rods and tube in aircraft. A taper fit is very strong, it retains better than 90% of the of a solid piece. With the shifter, a little play is good but two places could make it hard to find the gears. It makes for a strong, accurately located connection. A bolt through the tube and shaft would eventually wear and introduce slop in the connection.
As long as the pin is intact, it isn't hard to remove, but once someone buggers it, becomes more of a pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,101 Posts
On our race car, we drilled out the input shaft and used a bolt because we wanted to be able to take it apart more easily... never felt there was a detriment to shift quality, and it lasted years of hard use. 🤷
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I got the SOB. Slit what was left of the tube and peeled it away from the shaft, then I had a good protruding piece to hit. I took a heavy press plate as a bucking bar for the opposite side, one good hit and it was out.
Spent the rest of the afternoon running a tap through the bolt holes, and helicoiled one blind hole (for the turbo exh downpipe bracket. I then cleaned the "blue goo" and anaerobic sealer off the mating surface.
I have the other downpipe stud/bolt to remove (buggered as well) but there is more than enough protruding to weld a nut on, so should come out.
Then a deep clean and pull the ring gear to get another look at the pinion bearings from the other side, make a few gaskets and it is ready to be mated to the engine once it is pulled.
I have been nursing the old trans for over 10 years, I am looking forward to having it repaired.
Since the engine is going to be out, it is getting new mains, rods, timing chain and seals.
It should out last me.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top