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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would anyone use the above oil (fully synthetic 5w 50 'motorsport formula') in a saab 95 aero - i am currently using fully syn 5w 40 and car is standard.:cheesy:
 

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Despite all the posts on here..................I havent got a clue what the numbers mean ;oops:
 

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All modern motor oils are multicomponent solutions produced to protect and cool all moving parts under the bonnet and that way save our money for upgrades,not repairs.
Since it has few components inside with polymers which are able to change the form of their molecules under heat,the oil viscosity changes.
It is better in low temperatures oil to be thinner and flows easily,same on high,in our case very high temperatures it is not such a good idea to stay thinner-hot surfaces will burn it,there will be not good lubrication and constant flow and we have to pay 500 Euro for new MItsi:eek:.
The number in front of W means viscosity in low temperatures,the second one viscosity in high degrees.
SAE is other system of measurement at 100"C -only for multigrades oil.
For hotter turbo engines I've been told that constant viscosity at high temperatures is most important so that in the winter I'm using Motul 300V Competition 15W-50 and in summer MOTUL 300V Le Mans 20W-60,with no problems like sludge and old pistons were still in stock specifications and even with nice colour.
You already red my b****,so here is the correct information for oil Numbers
:cheesy: http://www.valvoline.com/carcare/articleviewer.asp?pg=ccr20040601ov

At last -there will be no problem to use this oil if it is from trusted brand .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Doctor phil, good info! I think i will try the 5w 50! Im sure that when the cars driven hard and engine is hot, it will be better for the oil to be that little bit thicker (rather than become so thin with the heat)


I think i am right with that conclusion;oops:

it is from Halfords, same brand i have used in my past 2 years and 4 oil changes:cheesy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Martin, you were speaking of the exact oil I was! I think I will buy it and give it a go, although the 5w 40 is working well enough for me and is still golden after 3k:eek:

That means I will be physcologically happier revving it up to 6k rpm and driving it that little bit harder!:cheesy:
 

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DoctorPhill said:
All modern motor oils are multicomponent solutions produced to protect and cool all moving parts under the bonnet and that way save our money for upgrades,not repairs.
Since it has few components inside with polymers which are able to change the form of their molecules under heat,the oil viscosity changes.
It is better in low temperatures oil to be thinner and flows easily,same on high,in our case very high temperatures it is not such a good idea to stay thinner-hot surfaces will burn it,there will be not good lubrication and constant flow and we have to pay 500 Euro for new MItsi:eek:.
The number in front of W means viscosity in low temperatures,the second one viscosity in high degrees.
SAE is other system of measurement at 100"C -only for multigrades oil.
For hotter turbo engines I've been told that constant viscosity at high temperatures is most important so that in the winter I'm using Motul 300V Competition 15W-50 and in summer MOTUL 300V Le Mans 20W-60,with no problems like sludge and old pistons were still in stock specifications and even with nice colour.
You already red my b****,so here is the correct information for oil Numbers
:cheesy: http://www.valvoline.com/carcare/articleviewer.asp?pg=ccr20040601ov

At last -there will be no problem to use this oil if it is from trusted brand .
Forgive me but I must correct a bit of misunderstanding here. The first rating (the "W" part) is rated differently than the second number. Despite being a smaller number, all motor oils are thicker at low temps than high temps, polymers or not. Only compare the "W" numbers to other "W" numbers-meaning an Ow is thinner than a 5w is thinner than a 10w....

I can't get the pic on my end so I can't make any recommendations on the oil, but if it's a good synth, it should be fine. I've run 50 weights in my 9-5 plenty without a worry.
 

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The classification of multi grade oils is fairly simple.


The first number represents the viscosity of the oil when cold, the "W" stands for winter, and not for weight as commonly assumed. The second number refers to the 'warm' viscosity and is equally important.

Basically the lower the number the greater the viscous nature of the oil. Thats why 0W-40 is very very runny and not particularly thick. It is intended to be used in modern engines and the lower viscousity is important in the use of turbocharged engines.

When selecting oil its important to select depending on the conditions that your drive in. 0W oil is rated to -20 degrees celsius for start up and is generally over kill.

The risk you run of using a heigh numbered oil such as 25W-60 is that you engine will seize when cold, or increase wear of internal components. This will be further detrimental during cold weather.

If 0W-40 is putting you off because of cost may i suggest a move to 5W-40, Shell Ultra Helix has a good 5w40 oil that is Saab endorsed for roughly half the price.

It should be noted that the higher numbered oils are intended for older motor cars.
 

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I wouldn't call 0W40 runny...just a tad thinner at startup. ;) 40 weights are highly recommended in the 9-5 given the nature of the stock oil pump. Yes, you are correct, Shell Helix 5W40 is a fine oil. Here in the States it's sold as Pennzoil Platinum 5W40 Euro Formula IIRC.
 

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bkrell said:
I wouldn't call 0W40 runny...just a tad thinner at startup. ;) 40 weights are highly recommended in the 9-5 given the nature of the stock oil pump. Yes, you are correct, Shell Helix 5W40 is a fine oil. Here in the States it's sold as Pennzoil Platinum 5W40 Euro Formula IIRC.
I don't know, it looks good enough to drink coming out the bottle :cheesy:
 

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It should be noted that the higher numbered oils are intended for older motor cars.
Not exactly-all competition ,rally and high tuned cars runs on more heat resistant "high numbered" oil.
The turbo with its very small and very-very hot contact areas will burn too thin oil and it is a rule for turbo cars-don't step on the floor till it warms up.
The presumption bigger numbers for bigger miles is true for mineral oils used in poor engines.
 

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DoctorPhill said:
Not exactly-all competition ,rally and high tuned cars runs on more heat resistant "high numbered" oil.
The turbo with its very small and very-very hot contact areas will burn too thin oil and it is a rule for turbo cars-don't step on the floor till it warms up.
The presumption bigger numbers for bigger miles is true for mineral oils used in poor engines.
Not in all situations. Many have learned that the lowest weight that gives adequate pressure and bearing film serves them best with the same or less wear than heavier, higher drag weights. There's no hard and fast rule for all situations. But yes, you serve yourself well with ANY grade by waiting until oil has warmed up properly (which has nothing to do with what your coolant gauge says) before putting it to the floor.
 

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DoctorPhill said:
Not exactly-all competition ,rally and high tuned cars runs on more heat resistant "high numbered" oil.
The turbo with its very small and very-very hot contact areas will burn too thin oil and it is a rule for turbo cars-don't step on the floor till it warms up.
The presumption bigger numbers for bigger miles is true for mineral oils used in poor engines.
Hi, are you still on 300v? Do you still use and like it? How your car feels?How ofter do you change it, once per 5000km or ? Have you tried oil heater (like webasto) for using 20w-60 all round year and also for protecting your engine from cold starts?

 
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