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Howdy! I just thought I'd add some things I learned while dealing with my fuel pump to hopefully help out others in the future.
This is not meant to be a replacement for the Haynes manual, or a bit of searching here and there online. Just to fill in some knowledge gaps.

1999 9-3
160,000 miles

Topics
Fuel Pressure Test and hooking up the gauge
Testing the Fuel Pump by wiring directly to the battery
Replacing the Fuel Pump Assembly
Reconnecting the Fuel Pump Assembly Fuel Lines
Check Fuel Pump Ground in the Trunk
Costco Interstate Battery 850241
My Major Screw Up


My fuel pump went out a couple winters ago. Long story short, it was cold and had the auto repair place push my car off their lot after dealing with the cranky father of the owner. I replaced the whole assembly with a ProParts one. Not particularly hard, just cold and uncomfortable position. Took me probably two days total to finish the job, the extra day for getting new hose line valves at the pump.
A few weeks ago, I had a very similar, if not same, experience as when my fuel pump died. I will skip the embarrassing screwup and pretend it never happened for purposes of learned experience.

Fuel Pressure Test
Here are the fuel lines that lead to the fuel rail. When performing a fuel pressure test on a Saab, and many newer cars, you have to get creative.
The loaner fuel pressure gauge kit I got from O'Reilly's was practically brand new and had just about everything I would need. I also needed a short piece (maybe 3-4") of 1/4" brake line and a few more hose clamps and short scraps of hose to rig it up.
1. I wrapped enough electrical tape around the brake pipe to stick into the end of the hose line and hold it in place under pressure.
2. The kit includes two 3" sections of hose to connect the three-way manifold in-between the inlet fuel hose and the fuel rail. Use clamps as needed.
3. I had a longer section of hose to connect to the fuel rail inlet so it was easier to hook up.



Disconnecting the fuel lines is a pain. Use a split piece of tubing like the Haynes manual advises
A - Pressurized fuel inlet line (grommets pushed out of way)
B - Fuel Rail
C - Return line



D - Fuel inlet pipe from fuel pump
E - Manifold
F - To fuel rail, inlet
G - Pressure gauge end

Testing the Fuel Pump by wiring directly to the battery
I used an regular extension cord to run from the battery to the fuel pump. The pump does have polarity so be sure to keep track of which is which. If you get it backwards it is noticeably louder.
Looking at 'N' in the picture below, the connector has four male prongs.
1. Connect the (-) negative wire to the lower right prong (Black wire in the harness)
2. Connect the (+) positive wire to the upper right prong.
3. Pump should run and you will/should be able to start and run your car.

Replacing the Fuel Pump Assembly
1. I used a pair of aviation metal snips to cut out a hole large enough to get access to the retainer ring, and small enough to cut my fingers every chance it could
2. Mark the fuel lines so you know which one is which. Or like me, you will regret it.
3. It was cold and I was grumpy so I cut the fuel lines to the valve and 90° hose connectors. I was hoping to save the connectors as I heard they are brittle.
4. The valve is still available but the return line connector is not, which is of course the one I broke. I believe it was maroon in color. What I ended up doing was buying a new valve and took the old one apart and took the internals out to allow fuel to return.


H - Fuel pump harness
I - Harness connecter to Fuel Pump
J - Fuel pump assembly top

Reconnecting the Assembly Fuel Lines
I used short pieces of 1/4" ID hose with clamps.


L - Pressurized fuel outlet, to filter & engine
M - Return line, back into tank
N - Fuel pump assembly electrical connectors
O - Marker to remember which line is which.

Check Fuel Pump Ground in the Trunk
My recent no start issue that had me completely stumped, with no help from my screw up, was due to something I have always read about but never ran into over the course of five or six Saabs was to check the grounds when dealing with electrical issues—until now.
After replacing the fuel pump I was able to get my car to start but not run longer than a few seconds unless I wired the fuel pump directly to the battery. This made me suspect the ECU and for whatever reason I finally checked the ground.
1. Had to look up where it was first of all.
2. Peeling back the carpet I saw that it was rusty but figured I clean it up.
3. Trying to loosen the nut, the whole bolt twisted out of the sheet metal and I was able to wiggle out the drains and next thing I could see was the driveway.
4. My car has very minimal rust on the outside so I was not at all expecting this.
5. I relocated the ground
6. Cut the zip tie holding the sunroof drain to let them hang below the body.

Getting it all back together, I ran the fuel pump to get the pressure up. Hooked all the wiring back to normal at the fuel pump and it started right up and ran. Maintained pressure and ran fine.

P - Trunk ground, (where it originally was)
Q - Antenna drain
R - Sunroof drain

Costco Interstate Battery 850241
There are a number of threads regarding which battery to use and since I had my camera handy, I thought I would add this.
Being in Minnesota, I measure the available space and find the battery with the highest cold cranking amp rating that will fit under the hood. Having a Costco membership along with Interstates reputation I buy my batteries from them.
You will notice that I have to turn the battery around and the cables reach fine enough. I don't recall having to make any modifications. It isn't even that tight.

From Vaughn's Summaries by Vaughn Aubuchon
BCI Group Size: 34
Fitment Code: 9
Costco Item #: 850241

Cold Cranking Amps (0°F): 795
Cranking Amps (32°F): 1000
Reserve Capacity: 105

Length: 10-5/16”
Width: 6-7/8”
Height: 7-13/16”


My Major Screw Up
If you have made it this far, I will reveal my major embarrassment of this whole troubleshooting fiasco that cost me four weekends and other chores to stack up.
Since this last issue was the same as the time my fuel pump went out, I ordered a fuel pump, minus assembly, without testing since my time is limited to weekends.
I ordered a Bosch from PartsGeek and it didn't come with a replacement hose. Plus, it was a Walbro pump. Which means had I bought the Walbro, it would have come with the hose and a couple bucks cheaper. Why the Bosch? I heard it was quieter.
Anyway, the new fuel pump is made for a 1/4" hose whereas the previous was 5/16". So I had pushed the original nylon hose back on and wrapped a 1/2" long piece of fuel hose around it so I could clamp it down tight.
Reinstalled it and three weekends of troubleshooting with very conflicting symptoms, two very wrong pieces of info off the Internet, I went back to the basics: fuel, air and spark.
I finally got the fuel pump gauge set up and had only 3 psi at the fuel rail. Three! Not the 40+/- is should have been. So I took it out and rigged it up for bench testing and of course the nylon hose was not able to compress enough and was spewing fuel back into the tank.
I don't mind missing the ground early on, but this was just plain dumb. I should have been using a pressure gauge the second after it still wouldn't start. Hell, the loaner set IS pretty nice. So hopefully, my picture and tips will help others figure out how to rig it up to use it.

So start with the basics. Chances are it is the fuel pump, but checking the ground and power at the fuse will go along way to saving time and money. Chalk it up as a learning experience either way.
 

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Current: 2000 9-3 Aero 5d, Family: 85 900i 3dr.
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Moderators -This post (ie the top one) is worthy of a sticky given the level of detail, photos and subject matter.
 

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Thank you for posting this. I have an 04 Saab 9-3 and I have to replace the dreaded fuel level sensor. Every one I've seen either the gas gauge doesn't work or has been replaced. I've been called a hack because I would rather cut a neat hole under the rear seat than put the car up on ramps and deal with rusty exhaust and rusty bolts in straps. I'm a certified mechanic by trade this looks like a good idea. Thanks 😊
 

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Really not a fan of how you added the flexible hoses to the fuel pump connections. Under some conditions due to a rising rate FPR, in boost you can see upwards of 60PSI of pressure in the fuel system. You have clamped to a non flared hollow plastic tube with worm clamps. This is a potentially deadly accident waiting to happen, do not do this.
 

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I have replaced my fuel pump + level sender assembly twice already. (1) replaced the factory assembly because the level sender failed. (2) replaced the replacement (1) because the fuel pump failed quite fast. (3) about to pull it all out again because the fuel sender in my 2nd aftermarket is failing.

Any suggestions on a decent quality replacement? I've already been burned twice by cheap aftermarket. Thanks!
 

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take the original bucket and sender and replace just the pump with the kit and reinstall, doesn't take all that long to put the pump into the housing.
 
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Wow, thank you for the quick replies! My current problem is the malfunctioning fuel level sender. The pump is still working.

The level sender failure in the original OEM unit left the potentiometer wiper hanging in the breeze, no longer pressed in contact with the potentiometer resistive element. A missing clip or something must have fallen off, and must be sitting on the bottom of my fuel tank.

The failure manifestation is specifically:
full -> reads zero on the gauge
3/4 - 1/4 fill -> reads apparently accurate on the gauge, but with random fluctuations as car is driven
< 1/4 fill (don't know, don't trust the gauge enough to run below 1/4)

Seems like with the float fully raised in full-tank condition, somehow the pot wiper is being forced away from the resistive element. Maybe I can pull the unit from the tank and carefully adjust/bend something to align float travel with the potentiometer element.

If that doesn't work I'll consider spending $250 for a new "OEM" unit.
 

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Digging up my purchase details, I find that I purchased a Pro Parts unit in May 2019. It failed more rapidly than either the OEM unit or my first replacement unit. Does say something about Pro Parts quality maybe?
 

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Check that rubber spliced in fuel line periodically, it will degrade in time. Ive even tried several of the "submersible" rubber lines & they dont last. Only way to go is metal or the plastic nylon stuff
 
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