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Discussion Starter #1
Long time no see.

1999 9-3 Coupe Base.

So, I decided to cut a hole in the rear seat to access the fuel pump from inside the car. I have done this twice before without issue. This time I was rushing & not so cautious and... I accidentally cut a bundle of wires leading to the rear of the car. With help from the WIS, I have identified two of the smaller wires in the bundle as a part of the evap shut-off valve, the others I have not been able to identify. The two smaller wires are green and green/red, which were wrapped together with two large black cables, containing each a black and brown wire. I will upload pictures as reference soon.

I am planning on dropping the tank soon to repair, or preferably, replace this harness. I didn't want to mess with the straps honestly, because this was a northern car and has some rusty bits, but obviously I have no recourse at this point. I am hoping that someone here will recognize these wires and point me in the right direction BEFORE I get in there.
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I agree. Just reconnect them. It doesn't matter what they are, unless you're trying to trace them back and replace a large section of the wiring. I had to drop the tank once on my '97 900 after a shop installed it crooked and wanted several hundred dollars to fix their mistake. The float wasn't aligned properly, and it would never show more than 3/4 of a tank. It took an hour, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it might be. I did cut a hole in the floor afterward so I wouldn't have to do it again.
 

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I agree too! And for others reading this in future - disconnect the battery first, and consider the implications of a soldering iron near the fuel tank!
 

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Yeah, I wouldn't solder. Unless you're really skilled solder joints often become brittle. You will find very few solder joints on automotive wiring harnesses. Crimp is the way to go, and those permaseal connectors will keep moisture out and are mechanically solid. I've never had one fail or become corroded.

This heat gun is PLENTY to shrink that plastic, and includes a heat deflector so you don't melt anything else. :)


that and a decent crimper and you're done in five minutes.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the response everyone. I have connectors and all other required tools for this repair. I was hoping to replace the entire harness, but after further inspection I realize that path is more effort than its worth. Unfortunately, the harness does not have a disconnect beyond the rear seat entering the car, and looks to continue into the engine bay.

As far as the battery goes, I always disconnect it before any electrical work. Forgot to mention it, but it should be common sense. Actually, the battery has been disconnected in this car for quite some time, as it is a project for me and I have many things left to do before start up.

After digging in deeper I realized that the mystery wires are actually apart of the ABS system. Rear wheel speed sensors specifically. The WIS confirms this and shows them connecting to the hydraulic unit in the engine bay. Honestly, wiring is kind of my thing, but this is certainly not worth bothering with.

Probably going to have to wait a few weeks before I can correct this though. I have too many other things to take care of at the moment, and I will need to order new tank straps before proceeding anyway, mine look rough and will likely not make it through disassembly.
 

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Be studious when repairing the wheel speed sensors - they are very low voltage and you need a clean, protected splice there. Try to preserve the shielding and insulation as much as possible.
 

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FYI on the tank: My cars are Northeastern and I always feared the tentacle, er, the tank straps. I alwasy figured I'd need to order new ones. But, I've worked on several of these and never had a problem loosening the nuts. I do usually hit them with PB Blast as much before time-wise as I can (you can probably start it days before without jacking the car if you wriggle under there). Note that there's a wrench flat on the stud side that you can put a (10 mm?) wrench on and that the nuts does not have to come off - there's a slot in the chassis bracket and once it's loosened a bit, just push the tank back up and pop it out. I put fresh nylocks there when I'm done - wait until the strap is disconnected and then running the nut off is a breeze.

I worry more about the lines and hoses coming off without breaking anything.
 
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