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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to replace my fuel filter this weekend as part of my slowly but surely 60k service. Just want to take the moment to say thank you to everyone for helping me up to this point. I never thought I would ever be able to do the things I am doing.

Anyway, in reading previous posts about the fuel filter, some people say to pull the fuse, and then crank the car till the fuel runs out. Other people caution against this saying that it can cause problems running it dry like that, and that the fuel should not be under high pressure and to just remove the filter slowly.

At this point I am leaning toward the "dont pull the fuse crowd", whats the worst that can happen? I blow fuel onto the siding of my house?(I will wear safety goggles)

Ok, fight :p
 

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whats the worst that can happen? I blow fuel onto the siding of my house?(I will wear safety goggles)
I'd say that the worst is a gasoline mist shoots out, a little gets in your eyes, making you jump and knock over your drop light which causes a spark......
 

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Just my opinion: I like the "rag over the fuel line conncections" concept. Why take the chance with of a potential fuel pump problem. Keep the drop light out of the way as well as any other potential sparking hazard. Have a fire extinguisher standing by if you are that conerened about fire and just be careful. I'm sure you have split gas somewhere sometime. I have only done filters on older 900's and there wasn't a problem.
 

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I will have the wife standing by with an extinguisher in case something bad happens. Did the same thing the first time I re-lit the pilot light on our gas furnace, and only had standard book matches to do it :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am going to have a bucket below the filter, and use a rag over things so it doesnt spray everywhere. I will also do it after my car has been sitting overnight so that things have a chance to settle down and nothing is hot.
 

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Here's the thing...WIS says to do it. It has the same warning procedure for the FPR. I can see the pressure at the fuel rail but at the filter it is much less.

I did mine without pulling the fuse.

As long as you are not positioned below or in range when loosening the bolts, you'll be fine. The initial squirt is minimal but it can go in different directions. The bucket below is a must.
 

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Left overnight means no pressure. I pulled the fuse as per instructions as I wanted to do it after the run home from work.

There is about a pint of petrol in there. You will spill some, so don't do it over tarmac. I used a meat tray to catch most of it.

You will get it up your arm. You will stink of petrol for a couple hours. Are you a smoker? You might not be afterwards!

No big deal, but be prepared for spillage:)

Edit:- My filter had the arrow the other way from the cap of the original: different manufacturer, just follow the arrow. Also, you need to hold the banjo with an open ender rather than just twirling the big nut so you don't break the pipes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was going to do it with a cig/*** in my mouth.:cheesy:

Actually, I am not a smoker so I am good there. Im glad to hear there will be no pressure if I let the car sit overnight, I imagine there will still be some spillage though. I have no choice but to do it over tarmac, but I will put a lot of cardboard down in the area, so that should take care of it. With regard to the hoses. I have read a couple of DIY threads, and noticed that an open ender and another wrench are needed, anyone know what size I need for the closed wrench? I need to pick up a new set of them, as I cannot find our old set(I got a toolbox now so I will stop losing things). I want to make sure the set I get at least has the right size in it.

Also, are there any torque specs for the hose connections/how do you know they are on there properly?
 

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16lbf ft.

Think 17mm? Ones maybe different to the other and might be odd 15 or 16 size. Spanners are pretty cheap, so go for the "full rack". There are odd 13, 15 and 16 sizes kicking about on the Saab as well as the 'normal' 12, 14 and 17.
 

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I have changed hundreds, other than being nailed a bit with gasoline sometimes, really no problems and never any danger.
Never wore glasses nor goggles either - even the first time..
Just work slowly and carefully, and be comfortable..

Using the best tools makes it an easier task. Needle nosed Vice-Grips are excellent, the hands are freer..
Metric hydraulic fitting tools are better when the going becomes tough..

Changing the filter on a Honda makes a man appreciate how much easier the Saab is to work on, and they are are generally designed for fairly quick and unobstructed access...
 
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