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Since I just replaced the fuel pump and the fuel sending unit, I was wondering whether it's not time for the fuel filter too. I bought the car several months ago and I don't have a consistent service record (the owner wasn't a SAAB person). It is so cheap that I am going to do it anyway. I will try to leave as little gas in the tank as possible before I start the work. I just don't know how to release the pressure in the fuel system so I can make it easier on me. Also, any other tips or tricky points regarding this operation are welcome. On a 93 2.1 non turbo it must be located above the rear right tire, is that correct?

Thanks
 

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Rosko said:
Since I just replaced the fuel pump and the fuel sending unit, I was wondering whether it's not time for the fuel filter too. I bought the car several months ago and I don't have a consistent service record (the owner wasn't a SAAB person). It is so cheap that I am going to do it anyway.
sure can't hurt. Take care to match filter to your BOSCH LH system: there's a number filters that are similar, and I've had parts houses get it wrong. There are differences.

I will try to leave as little gas in the tank as possible before I start the work. I just don't know how to release the pressure in the fuel system so I can make it easier on me.
remove gas cap. you can disconnect neg. battery terminal 1st to be super sure.

Also, any other tips or tricky points regarding this operation are welcome. On a 93 2.1 non turbo it must be located above the rear right tire, is that correct?
Yes, that's the location. It's pretty much a straight forward job.
 

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I guess you also run the car and pull the fuse for the fuel pump, and the engine will suck all the fuel from the line and shut off on its own.
 

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DanF. said:
I guess you also run the car and pull the fuse for the fuel pump, and the engine will suck all the fuel from the line and shut off on its own.
Yeah, do that and crank it till you get nothing. The amount of fuel in the tank doesn't matter. Also WEAR GOGGLES for this one, and don't smoke
:lol:
 

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get some good penetrating oil and soak both of the banjo bolts. Wait awhile. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. Find the fuel rail and loosen one of the builts on either end. This should relieve the pressure. Wear goggles... she squirts. Be sure to get a fuel filter that comes with the copper crush washers that have the rubber seal on the inside diameter. Makes life a lot easier. I would imagine you could use some sort of fuel proof permatex if you are unable to locate some. The dealer carries them but the price is outlandish. Once everything is hooked up you turn the car to the on position and TOUCH the negative terminal and watch for rule to come out of the fuel rail. Once that happens stop touching, close the fuel rail, turn the car off then reconnect the negative terminal.
This is where I got the info to do mine. http://www.thesaabsite.com/900old/C900-fuel-filter-replacement.htm
 

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That's a lot of unnecessary work to relieve the fuel pressure in that saabsite writeup
 

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I just take my wrench, jack up the car, loosen one fitting carefully, it spritzes a little then take out the unit. Get a chinese food tray to catch the drainage after you've removed the filter completely. Don't be wimpy :lol:
 

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Be especially careful not to bugger or nick the plastic fuel lines. They are very, very, very tender, fragile, brittle.

A slipped wrench when removing a banjo bolt that I declare was nearly welded on (deformed the filter body which I was using as a backup) resulted in a leak--barely had enough line to reinsert the banjo fitting's barb.:evil:

Made a relatively simple chore into a significant event.:eek:
 

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I used the method DanF described--no pressure left when I cracked the bolts and very little fuel dribble. I still recommend safety glasses and wait till the exhaust has cooled just because you can...
 

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TheRedBaron said:
That's a lot of unnecessary work to relieve the fuel pressure in that saabsite writeup
I think the majority of it is due to the safety risks of working on 'live' fuel lines. There are a fair number of things to keep in mind to make sure all the safety hazards are covered.

Also be sure that if the fuel lines need clamping at all (they shouldn't - most effort would be in getting the banjo's to undo), special plastic fuel-line clamping pliers are needed.

Craig.
 
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