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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to change the fuel filter on my 2000 Viggen. It has not been replaced in a loooong time and the fastener is very rusty. I've always left the muffler work to the pros for reasons like this, so I don't know how best to open the bracket. Should I hacksaw through the screw at the gap where the bracket comes together? I hit it with PB Blaster and tried using what I think to be the correct allen key socket. It felt like it was slipping, so I stopped.

As for the bracket itself, I cannot find a new one on the typical sites and I don't know how it attaches to the car (visibility is not great at the moment.) As a result, I'm hesitant to take shear cutters to the bracket.


Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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The bracket is welded on, don't cut it. But, you can bend it a little and cut through the bolt. With a bit of PBBlast they usually come loose. You could also try that CRC / Loctite freeze spray although my preference for that is some freeze spray from an electronics store and then some PB Blast. The electronics stuff is much colder/better. The only trouble is finding an electronics store these days...



FYI - I would suggest breaking the banjo bolts free first with the filter tightly clamped, then lightly sung them and go to work on the bolt. Once it's flopping around that job becomes harder... and you don't want to break a line.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice. I probably would have busted the fuel line.


The bracket is welded on, don't cut it. But, you can bend it a little and cut through the bolt. With a bit of PBBlast they usually come loose. You could also try that CRC / Loctite freeze spray although my preference for that is some freeze spray from an electronics store and then some PB Blast. The electronics stuff is much colder/better. The only trouble is finding an electronics store these days...



FYI - I would suggest breaking the banjo bolts free first with the filter tightly clamped, then lightly sung them and go to work on the bolt. Once it's flopping around that job becomes harder... and you don't want to break a line.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
...one question on this though. If I break the banjo connectors loose but cannot get the bracket open to change the filter, won't I have a problem reconnecting the fuel lines? The washers would need to be renewed and I'd be committed, right?





The bracket is welded on, don't cut it. But, you can bend it a little and cut through the bolt. With a bit of PBBlast they usually come loose. You could also try that CRC / Loctite freeze spray although my preference for that is some freeze spray from an electronics store and then some PB Blast. The electronics stuff is much colder/better. The only trouble is finding an electronics store these days...



FYI - I would suggest breaking the banjo bolts free first with the filter tightly clamped, then lightly sung them and go to work on the bolt. Once it's flopping around that job becomes harder... and you don't want to break a line.
 

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There's a nub with wrench flats on one or both sides of the filter so you can hold it from turning or twisting the bracket when you undo the banjos.

Also, there will be fuel pressure in there. You could probably run the car and pull fuse 32 while running to cut pressure. Either way, have a short bucket underneath ready for the gas left in the filter... and keep your face away as you open the banjos the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry, I meant if I'm unsuccessful removing the rusty fastener and have to reconnect the fuel lines at least temporarily, will the washers seal again? Or will I need to open the lines completely to put in new washers?




There's a nub with wrench flats on one or both sides of the filter so you can hold it from turning or twisting the bracket when you undo the banjos.

Also, there will be fuel pressure in there. You could probably run the car and pull fuse 32 while running to cut pressure. Either way, have a short bucket underneath ready for the gas left in the filter... and keep your face away as you open the banjos the first time.
 

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Sorry, I was already addressing the first point when you posted the question.



FWIW, I had no issues re-tightening the banjos and having them seal a second, third, and fourth time while diagnosing my fuel line issues. I had the copper washers, which might be more forgiving than the type with the rubber centers if the rubber is old.

But, even if they leak after retightening due to filter removal job bypass, you can always pull the banjos out, put in new washers, and tighten everything up with the old filter.

I actually ended up "refinishing" my old, original copper washers by hand dragging/sanding them across wet/dry paper on a flat surface through several grades of paper. Worked like they were new. YMMV if you try this.
 

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I actually ended up "refinishing" my old, original copper washers by hand dragging/sanding them across wet/dry paper on a flat surface through several grades of paper. Worked like they were new. YMMV if you try this.
Copper (and aluminum) crush washers will work harden in use. In addition to dressing the surface, you can anneal them to make them soft again. I'm sure Google knows the technique (basically, heat 'em up and let 'em cool).
 

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Copper (and aluminum) crush washers will work harden in use. In addition to dressing the surface, you can anneal them to make them soft again. I'm sure Google knows the technique (basically, heat 'em up and let 'em cool).
Interesting point. I hadn’t thought about that aspect.
 
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