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Discussion Starter #1
I am currently working on completing my 60k maintenence. So far I have changed the oil, changed the engine air filter, and changed the spark plugs.

Next I plan to order a new belt and the parts for the fuel filter change. I do have a couple questions though depite reading all the searched posts about the topic.

So far I understand the following:

Pull fuse for fuel pump
Start engine and let it starve from lack of fuel
Pull plastic "cage" off fuel filter

Now this is where I get confused:

I understand I need two wrenches to do the job, and I need to use them at the same time. What kind of wrenches do I need? What size, and what type?

Also, are both of the bolts on the same side of the filter, or are they on opposite sides. On one picture, it looked like the fuel line runs in and runs out of the same side of the filter, another looked like it goes in one end and out the other.

What is the exact procedure for undoing the fuel filter from the lines?

Thank You,
Doug
 

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And after you have run the engine to the point of fuel starvation I usually crank it a few more times just to be sure as much pressure is gone as possible.

You are correct that one fuel line goes in on one side and the other fuel line goes out the opposite end. Have you climbed under the vehicle and taken a look at the setup yet? You'll see exactly what is meant when people say you need to wrenches. Two crescent wrenches (non-adjustable type) would be ideal, one wrench will go onto the filter (larger size wrench) itself to hold it in place while the other smaller one goes onto the banjo bolt (the ones sticking out off the two ends of the filter) that secures the fuel line to the filter. While using the larger wrench to hold the filter stationary, turn the crescent wrench that is on the bolt itself. Once its off make sure to renew the gasket rings when putting the new filter in. Another thing to note is that the two lines have two different size bolts holding the fuel lines to the filter, so technically you need three wrenches.

Hopefully this helps you some.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the explanation. I noticed on eeuroparts they specify 4 gasket rings that you need. Well 2x two different gasket rings. I have taken a look underneath, but got confused by a picture I saw when cruising old threads that for some reason made it look like I should be seeing two hoses coming out of the same side. Now it makes sense with the two wrenches. I was thinking that I had to turn the two sides at once or something.

Thanks
Doug
 

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Does it list a fuel filter replacement at 60k miles? The NG900 didn't need to be replaced until 100k. I replaced mine at 125k and there was still some life left in it. I cut open the old filter to see how it is constructed and wanted to know how this could last 100k.
Also be prepared to deal with a possible fuel pump replacement. They have a tendency to stop working just after the filter is replaced for some reason. Fuel pressure regulators can be sensative to fuel filter replacements too.
 

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i was about to get mine changed on thrsday. has anyone else had this fuel pump after filter change ?

i dont want to be shelling out £350 + after swapping a £10 filter.

i have 69k on my 900 now and i think it was supposed to be changed at 60 or 66k

T



GaryG said:
Does it list a fuel filter replacement at 60k miles? The NG900 didn't need to be replaced until 100k. I replaced mine at 125k and there was still some life left in it. I cut open the old filter to see how it is constructed and wanted to know how this could last 100k.
Also be prepared to deal with a possible fuel pump replacement. They have a tendency to stop working just after the filter is replaced for some reason. Fuel pressure regulators can be sensative to fuel filter replacements too.
 

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I have heard of this problem also. I have no idea why excatly a fresh filter could harm the pump for fpr, but I didn't want to take the chance. But that that was 25k miles ago, maybe I should look into this again.
 

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100K miles on a fuel filter is amazing - and the one for the Passat V6 was also very high mileage(I think they claimed lifetime?).

Is todays fuel that much cleaner ?
Are the new plastic fuel tanks that much more durable inside ?
Apparently we have two yeses here .

No way can I see the filter having any effect on the pump or regulator.
When I go to change the 900 filter, I'll wait until the tank is close to empty and relieve the pressure manually and use line pinchers if possible.
Running the car out of fuel may take 10,000 miles from the already worn pumps life..
Or do I exaggerate ??
 

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earthworm said:
Running the car out of fuel may take 10,000 miles from the already worn pumps life..
Then is this why they say changing the filter can hurt the pump?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now I am questioning changing it unless I have fuel related problems. I don't want to kill my pump.
 

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Maybe this can be found by search, but what are the symptoms of a dirty filter?
 

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I think he means running the tank dry. I can't see how just pulling the fuse and shutting the pump off could do any harm. After all you shut the pump off all the time when you turn the car off. Not that I'm disputing the correlation of pump failure with the filter change, I'm just suggesting that it isn't due to pulling the fuse and running the fuel out of the line.

As for the FPR, I've got a theory. These things work with little plungers and springs etc. Maybe when you depressurize the line, the plunger goes beyond it's routine range and catches in it's piston somehow. I'm really just making this up, but it's the only reasonable reason I can think of.

I can't even begin to invent one for the pump itself. But, how about this? People replace the filter when the car shows symptoms of fuel starvation. However in some cases it isn't the filter it's just the pump beginning to fail. Maybe replacing the filter even helps for a little while until the pump really fails.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
We'll the fuel filter is shown as a 60k item, but should I just wait until I have an actual reason to change it? Do most people replace these preventatively, or just wait for a problem?
 

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stromer said:
Then is this why they say changing the filter can hurt the pump?
I do not think at all that changing a filter can possibly hurt anything.
Also, it is true that I exaggerate about the effects of running a pump to refill the lines and recreate pressure.
Theoretically, If a pump is good for 99,000 miles and at 90,000 miles the filter is changed and the lines are re-pressurized , well, one can see some relationship,(if a failure occurs), but I would think it is primarily coincidence..
 

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JMarket, you are really on to something !

The keyword is the range of normal mechanical movement.

As an example, during the brake fluid bleeding procedure, if one floors the pedal, the cylinder seals enter new territory in the bore - this may be rusty, and the seals are then torn up.
This has happened in the past, probably many times- but most mechanics now know better.
But a similar thing can happen with other mechanisms, and probably does.
Maybe better engineering design can be employed to avoid this situation.. This includes more sophisticated repair procedures...
 

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DougR said:
Pull fuse for fuel pump
Start engine and let it starve from lack of fuel
Pull plastic "cage" off fuel filter
Frankly I'm not too crazy about this idea. No need to introduce the possiblity of vapour lock.

When I replaced my fuel filter, I had a drip pan and loosened the bolt very slowly with a rag covering the bolt. There wasn't that much pressure and there wasn't that much fuel that actually dripped into the pan.

I have posted some pictures in another thread. Take a look.

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=52678
 

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Interesting Rotate. My only experience was opening up the lines under the hood to replace a leaky washer. When I did that fuel sprayed out like an aerosol can! Still, if you wear goggles and maybe hold a rag next to the joint, the actual volume probably isn't that much. I think the big danger is your eyes and any nearby open flames/drop lights etc.
 

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got ARB poly bushes, ARB links, steering rack poly bush, idler pullys and......the fuel filter swapped today.

i pick the car up later tonight so fingers crossed.

i asked the mechanic to crack the line as opposed to turning the engine to drop the pressure. hopefully there will not be any problems

P
 
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