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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a bad wheel bearing in front driver's side. I've also got a desire to do this as quickly and cheaply as possible. I know that to replace the bearing, I need to press it. I don't own a press and there are way too many shady shops around here for me to ask someone to do it with any real peace of mind.

What I did find was a full hub with bearing on ebay. I'm supposing that if I just swap hubs, I can avoid the whole pressing thing? Does this work, or am I just wishing too hard?

Thanks for the input
 

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You have no idea whether the bearing in the knuckle/hub sold on ebay is good either. I got lucky and put several into my car from the junkyard and it worked, to convert my car to vented brakes from solid ones.

I've attempted to push wheel bearings out myself with a hydraulic bottle-jack. It worked, barely (destroyed the seals on the jack in the process). It would be very easy if you mounted a proper size bottle jack (one I used was a 5ton so go bigger than that) inside a frame made of angle-iron bolted together as a press. I don't think there's really that much to the process. Just get everything aligned and press away. The critical thing is to get enough torque on the axle nut (the huge thirtysomething mm one) after the car's back together, and not to set the car down all the way on the wheel before it's torqued at least partially.

If in your situation at present, I'd jack the car up, put it on jackstands/cinder blocks (something that can stay for a while) and then remove the knuckle (pop the tie rod end out of the knuckle with hammers or a press, unbolt the ball joints from the control arms) yourself. Buy the bearing, then bring the whole knuckle/hub to a shop you think you can trust and have them press it (under your watchful eye if possible). Tell them it's for your project hot rod or rally car you're building and they'll quite possibly do a better job, and definitely listen to you more :cheesy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The hub assembly is new. Just seeing if that process is easier than a bearing replacement. It would def be cheaper.
 

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No. I don't know what that goes on but it's not a front C900 hub/bearing.
 

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Yeah, that's a rear. Or something. I've never had a rear go bad on me, so I don't know exactly what they look like, but that pic there reminds me of one.
Living in Hawaii must be hard, for car parts of any kind. Are very heavy/large/perishable things much more expensive out there because of shipping?
 

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That's not the rear hub either unless you have a RWD C900. :)

I don't recommend this to anyone, but I recently removed the hub from the knuckle with a help of a big hammer and a socket that fit to the hub. In the process the bearing got destroyed (which didn't matter) but anything else didn't break. There was a ton of rust inside the knuckle so the bearing was really stuck on both sides.

The outer bearing ring is still stuck in the knuckle and I need to find something of a correct size to push it out with my press.
 

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That's not the rear hub either unless you have a RWD C900. :)

I don't recommend this to anyone, but I recently removed the hub from the knuckle with a help of a big hammer and a socket that fit to the hub. In the process the bearing got destroyed (which didn't matter) but anything else didn't break. There was a ton of rust inside the knuckle so the bearing was really stuck on both sides.

The outer bearing ring is still stuck in the knuckle and I need to find something of a correct size to push it out with my press.
The bearing is most often destroyed when it is removed from the hub. Even the Bentley says so--so your hammer method is probably allright! Even I used a hammer to finish the job after my jack blew its seals.
 

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The outer bearing ring is still stuck in the knuckle and I need to find something of a correct size to push it out with my press.
It is easy, but inner ring is real problem! How to remove it and do not damage polished hub axle... I've used Dremmel and carefully cut this ring (almost). Then I've used big screwdriver with "carefully calculated" hammer strike and ring breaks and can be removed easy :cool:.
 

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I just used a screw-type gear puller to get the inner ring off the polished hub axle. Couldn't be easier!:D
Maybe my experience was one-in-a-million, and they're all really hard to get off except for mine. For me, the hardest part was removing the lug studs from a hub (wanted to get hub machined because it had excess lateral runout).
 

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I just replaced my passenger side front hub this week, so I can give you some assistance. First, the pic shown (bet it's off e-bay) is not the front hub of your car. I'm not saying they don't have the right part, but that's not it.

I thought I'd buy a new bearing, take off the steering knuckle, and then have my mechanic press out the old bearing and press in the new one, ensuring the job is done right with minimal labor costs. So I ordered a replacement bearing for $100 from my local auto parts place.

But the bearing didn't arrive in a timely fashion, and that gave me time to realize that I could just buy a used steering knuckle with the hub and bearing already in place. Sure, it's not knew, but it ended up only costing me $75 and I saved the cost and effort of having my mechanic replacing the bearing.

I got mine from vandsautorecyclers.com in Rancho Cordova, CA, but I'm sure any good used parts supplier can get you one. Over the years, I've had good luck with Dennis Sweeney Saab in Pennsylvania.

While there was bit of rust on the various nuts on my car, the hardest part was freeing the tie rod end from the steering knuckle. After all the recommended removal methods failed to work, I ended up placing my bottle jack under the tie rod end on the threaded part (with the nut on it) and jacking it up. It then popped loose. With out any problems (like if the car was new), you could probably do the whole job in an hour or so. Since I had a couple of corrosion challenges and also stripped the screw holding the brake rotor to the hub, it took me about 3 hours. It's not a hard job.

Sorry about the italics but I can't seem to turn them off.

 

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I just changed mine this week. Instead of buying a new bearing ($100) and paying the shop to put it in place, I bought a "recycled" steering knuckle/hub assembly from vandsautorecylers.com (although any used parts supplier should have them) for $75.

The job should take a little over an hour if no parts are corroded into place (Hah!). I had issues with corrosion and difficulties getting the tie rod end off the knuckle. I ended up popping it out by backing off the nut on the tie rod end to the end of the threaded portion, and using a bottle jack, popped it out by pumping the jack under the rod end. Be careful removing the screws holding the brake rotor to the hub. I stripped one of mine.
 

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Instead of buying a new bearing ($100) and paying the shop to put it in place, I bought a "recycled" steering knuckle/hub assembly.....
Now you have the choice of buying an Alignment now, or Tires and an Alignment later.
 

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Jim's right. I tried to align my car myself, with tape measures and repeated measurements, and then went to get an actual alignment immediately afterwards. I was off so far that I had negative toe!

The other thing about a new knuckle/hub is that you could be introducing brake judder and/or just using another bad wheel bearing, since you really have no idea whether the bearing in it is any good, coming from a junkyard. This does mean that you have your old one to go back to, and you can drop it off at a shop for cheap...but then you're out another $50 alignment.
 

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Now you have the choice of buying an Alignment now, or Tires and an Alignment later.
It's not clear to me how replacing one steering knuckle with another one just like it automatically qualifies one for a new alignment. Could you explain?

I realized when using a recycled one you're not getting a new bearing, and I'm willing to take that chance. However, after it's all been done, it's running like a top.
 

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In a perfect world, replacing a bad bearing with a good one should put you back INTO alignment if nothing else has been moved.
 
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