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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to change the front brake pads on my 1986 Saab 900, and I'm running into problems with the calipers. I've tried pushing the pads apart while still in there to reset the spacing, and have managed to get the yoke to come out a little more than needed for the old pad. However, it's still not enough to fit the new pad in. Then, whenever I reset the piston back flush, it pulls the yoke back so that not even the old pad will fit in. Does anyone have any ideas how to get more play in the yoke? The manual that I have doesn't give much insight, but my guess is that the indirect piston on the engine side of the assembly actuates the yoke, and it feels like it is stuck.
 

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i think the pistons are on like a screw thread and twist? as they work/come out, so they cannot just be levered back in like some car pistons, on the later,87 on, rear ones(like handbrake fronts) you have to remove a bolt (14mm head)at the back, and there is an allen head bolt (4mm?)which you unscrew to take of the pressure of the opiston and can move it back to put new in, it might be exactly the same on the one's like yours but having never had to change them i did'nt have to find out, but must be similar system of release.
 

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TeddyBouch said:
I'm trying to change the front brake pads on my 1986 Saab 900, and I'm running into problems with the calipers. I've tried pushing the pads apart while still in there to reset the spacing, and have managed to get the yoke to come out a little more than needed for the old pad. However, it's still not enough to fit the new pad in. Then, whenever I reset the piston back flush, it pulls the yoke back so that not even the old pad will fit in. Does anyone have any ideas how to get more play in the yoke? The manual that I have doesn't give much insight, but my guess is that the indirect piston on the engine side of the assembly actuates the yoke, and it feels like it is stuck.
There is a special tool for resetting the caliper/piston. I used a pair of circlip pliers to twist/push the cylinder back in.
 

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clanky said:
There is a special tool for resetting the caliper/piston. I used a pair of circlip pliers to twist/push the cylinder back in.
The Haynes has a diagram and procedure for making the tool.

Teddy: there's good discussion of ways w/out special tool here.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, y'all. It turned out that the twisting was the issue - I simply wasn't twisting it enough. The manual didn't really explain what the twisting does. Based on the results that I got from repeated twisting, pushing, pulling, and testing, it seems that the pushing moves the primary piston out of the way, and the twisting gives slack to move the secondary piston.
 

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TeddyBouch said:
I'm trying to change the front brake pads on my 1986 Saab 900, and I'm running into problems with the calipers. I've tried pushing the pads apart while still in there to reset the spacing, and have managed to get the yoke to come out a little more than needed for the old pad. However, it's still not enough to fit the new pad in. Then, whenever I reset the piston back flush, it pulls the yoke back so that not even the old pad will fit in. Does anyone have any ideas how to get more play in the yoke? The manual that I have doesn't give much insight, but my guess is that the indirect piston on the engine side of the assembly actuates the yoke, and it feels like it is stuck.
Because the front calipers on the pre-88 cars (maybe pre-87?) are the handbrake front setup, you have to wind in the pistons after removing the old pads. Simply pushing it back doesn't re-set the automatic adjustment feature for the handbrake.

There are special tools which engage pairs of holes in the piston face to rotate it back into the caliper body.

However, after doing that, you'll find that you might need to lever the caliper yoke back across to get more clearance on the off side, and then wind in the piston some more, then lever out the yoke a bit more, etc. Calipers get really dirty and no matter how well they're lubed, the yokes are almost never easy to slide about and tend to get stuck.

Craig.
 
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