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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Could use some pointers to a few steps as we're in a massive hurry and looking to avoid errors.


1. Front - How can I hold the crankshaft and remove the bolt with the engine out, tranny off? Is it too late? My mechanic said he could probably spin it off as-is with his 3/4" gun, but he's concerned about spinning the valve train backwards with that much force.

Should I just do this job later when the engine is back in? From what I see in the WIS, it looks like I can do this easily with the engine in... and if so, I will put it on hold until later. Time is short.


2. Rear - Tranny is off, flywheel is off.

a. From the WIS, it doesn't look like the plate that the starter mounts through has to come off. Looking at the engine, it looks like it might overlap the seal a little. Does it need to be removed?

b. Install instructions? The WIS suggests a SAAB specific "protective sleeve" and a couple drive tools. Obviously I have none of those. How do I properly install the rear seal without damaging it?


3. Flywheel Install

a. Flywheel Bolts are TTY, but bolts are not available in the USA. Does anyone replace these? Can I blue loctite them and just change the torque spec to something besides a TTY pull? I haven't seen anyone suggest replacing these when doing a clutch. I can't imagine that I'll be able to hunt down a proper TTY bolt from a hardware supplier.

b. What's the purpose of using (per the WIS) tool 8394868 as a "backstop" when installing the flywheel? How is it done in my garage?
 

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An impact should zip off the front crank pulley with little issue. I've not met one yet that I couldn't undo with my 1/2 impact*.

For the rear, the plate can stay on and I recommend it as it seals a passage down the back of the block. Unless that is leaking, probably better to leave it.

For both, go slow and use lots of lube (sounds like some other advice I've heard). Notice how the seal works and make sure the edge does not get folded in under itself. Sometimes you can push them in by hand, others I use a blunt object and tap them home.

I've always re-used flywheel bolts. Blue locktite is insurance that I've used as well, but never had a failure. Isn't the tool the recommend used for keeping the engine from rotating when torquing the bolts?


*I've been working on a 2002 Honda Civic and they are notorious for extremely high torque value on the crank pulley. my impact would not budge it and the engine was out so holding things still was a problem (could not use a massive breaker bar). I did a little googling and found a FAT socket (bought locally too). Basically a 17mm with a really thick sidewall. It worked a treat! It gives the impact a bit of mechanical advantage (like a bigger hammer) since it is hitting the bolt with much more mass! COOL!
 

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Bob, search for the "butter tub" trick for the rear seal. There's a commonly available butter or cottage cheese container you can get at the grocery store that will fit over the flywheel end of the crankshaft once you cut the lip off. It provides a nice tapered surface to slide the seal down on. When it's in position, another trick is to use a 3" PVC pipe cap to seat it. The actual diameter of the cap is about 4", almost exactly the same size as the seal. I took one and drilled a series of holes in it, and then used some longer bolts in the flywheel holes to draw the pipe cap down and evenly press in the seal.

I've always reused the flywheel bolts, too, and haven't had a problem.
 

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I've used a 2L soda bottle in lieu of a butter tub, if you cut a section where it tapers (a couple of inches from the cap) it should be about right, you can cut it vertically if you need to adjust the diameter. Personally if its not leaking I'd likely leave it alone, even on cars with 250K I've not really seen them leak - unlike the front that is almost always leaking (along with the oil pump o-ring).

8394868 is for locking the flywheel, you can stuff some soft rope down a cylinder or maybe wedge a screwdriver in the flywheel, but if I recall you should be able to torque the flywheel by holding it by hand and I just do the crank pulley bolt up impact gun tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm having a little trouble visualizing the "tool" use. Does the tub/bottle guide the center of the seal over the crankshaft or the outer edge into the block?



As for leaving it... I always seem to get rear main seals that eventually leak in every car I buy. I was looking to avoid that. I thought there was engine oil on the bottom of the bell housing, but I will look again to see if I can verify that.
 

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The seal is spring loaded on the ID (so it stays tight and seals against the crank), you put the tub/tube on the inside of the seal so you can spread the ID outward allowing it to fit over the crank without catching and folding back on itself/getting damaged. So basically you have: backplate, seal, tube, crank.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The seal is spring loaded on the ID (so it stays tight and seals against the crank), you put the tub/tube on the inside of the seal so you can spread the ID outward allowing it to fit over the crank without catching and folding back on itself/getting damaged. So basically you have: backplate, seal, tube, crank.

Gracias!
 

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*I've been working on a 2002 Honda Civic and they are notorious for extremely high torque value on the crank pulley. my impact would not budge it and the engine was out so holding things still was a problem (could not use a massive breaker bar). I did a little googling and found a FAT socket (bought locally too). Basically a 17mm with a really thick sidewall. It worked a treat! It gives the impact a bit of mechanical advantage (like a bigger hammer) since it is hitting the bolt with much more mass! COOL!
I had a '96 Accord and got to the crank bolt while on my way to the timing belt. Nothing I had would move it. Eventually I put it back together and drove it down the street to a shop. They laughed at me for my lack of talent and then proceeded to explode a impact socket trying it themselves. They shop owner called a buddy, who was so intrigued that he drove over with his 1100 lb ft 1" impact and a MASSIVE socket. After hammering on it for 30-45 seconds it finally came off.

Screw Hondas. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think the usual trick with Japanese cars is to put a breaker bar on it, wheel off, slowly lower the car and let the weight of the car break it free. That said, my daughter’s Nissan came off with my HF Earthquake 1/2” impact.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Should I use the factory torque spec on the flywheel bolts including the step 2 TTY pull, or should I just pick a number over the step 1 level and go with that?
 

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I picked up a cheap VW flywheel lock tool on Amazon I've used several times.

The make/model I picked up was. EMPI 5003 FLY WHEEL LOCK TOOL 6V or 12V, VW BUG, BUS, GHIA, TYPE 3. YOu have to mickey mouse it a bit - get one tooth locked and jam something between the flywheel and the tooth on the other side to keep tooth 1 pressed into the flywheel. Worked for several flywheels, clutches and crank bolts.



Inspect the rear engine cover closely to make sure it's not weepy. One of my first clutch jobs had a lingering slow leak which I am pretty sure was from the plate. It's a little extra work to remove it, clean up the mating surfaces on the plate and block and reseal, but it's better than a grimy oilpan/bellhousing soon after you cleaned everything up.
 

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I have never used anything except a giant screwdriver or prybar in a flywheel tooth. I'm sure a formal lock tool would be easier, but it's far from necessary. I wouldn't stress too much.
 

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FWIW I removed the rear plate during my rebuild. I cleaned and painted everything. I installed the seal into the plate before reinstalling onto the block. No problem at all. I did reuse the flywheel bolts with loctite. Holding through 300hp, no problem.
 
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